So excited to be a part of the Open Forum (with discussions and debates) at the Third European Wood Fire Conference in LeBorne, France

The French organisers of the Third European Wood Fire Conference in LeBorne, France have selected the speakers for the Open Forums and Discussions.  I am so pleased to be amongst so many talented wood firers including Julia Nema, Fred Olsen, Coll Minogue, and Ben Richardson.  It is going to be such an exciting time to be in this French village in the Loire Valley, home to wood firing kilns since the medieval era.

It is still not too late to register.  If you are into wood firing and want to be in ‘the place’, then check out the conference, find a flight, get some accommodation and go!  There is a week full of talks, demonstrations, discussions and debates and, of course, the meeting of old friends and the making of new ones.  The Third European Wood Fire Conference is August 25-September 1 at the Ceramique Contemporaine LaBorne Centre.  The website is at laborne.org

This is the listing for my talk…the more I research the marginalization of women in Ceramics the more that I am finding it is NOT a phenomena known in the area north of Berlin where women have been expected to work and have been equal in their training and their ability to supervise workshops for decades.  My talk focuses on North America with a nod to what has systematically happened in wood firing in Japan.

Thursday 30 August 10.45 – 11.15 am
Mary Ann Steggles

Mary Ann Steggles is Professor of Ceramic History and Ceramics at the School of Art, University of Manitoba, in Winnipeg.  Alongside her teaching, she curates, researches and writes on the history of wood firing and contemporary ceramics in Canada for various ceramics journals. She is working on a research project about the silencing of women ceramists and the marginalization of both women and ceramics in the world of contemporary art.

 

Her talk will focus on the marginalization of women within the world of wood fired ceramics.  In Japan, women are not allowed to fire the large wood kilns.  In Canada, the world of wood firing is dominated by a male view.  Historically, men have been the only visiting wood fire artists, their stories are predominant in the publications, even attempts to build a smaller kiln become controversial because the students see through male eyes.  The kiln has to be ever bigger, firing even longer, consuming more wood to get layer upon layer of fly ash on the surface.  Mary Ann students are women.  It is time they had women role models.  What are the experiences of other women wood firers?  and how can we create an aesthetic that counters that of this male view?

Author: maryannsteggles

My creative life has many facets. I am a Professor of Ceramics and Art History at the School of Art, University of Manitoba. I write for a number of ceramic journals including Studio Potter, Art and Perception, Ceramics Technical, New Ceramics, and Ceramics Monthly. My research focuses on historical and contemporary Canadian woodfiring and, in particular, the marginalization of women. This year I have presented papers on the topic of the marginalization of women within the field of ceramics at the Third European Wood Fire Conference in La Borne, France, and the Creative Women Conference at the University of Guelph. I own Wheel and Throw. Contemporary Ceramic Design where I produce limited edition ceramic bottles. In the spring of 2019, I will be one of the resident artists at Hospitalfield in Abroath, Scotland. Can't wait! I can be reached at maryannsteggles@icloud.com

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