Joo Young Han

 

Joo Young (Grace) Han graduated with a BFA from Dankook University in South Korea, an art faculty that focused on traditional Korean ceramics. It was at Dankook that Han learned by observing the master, Joon Hoon Park, and by throwing hundreds of Korean tea bowls, known as sabal, daily.  Over time, she became proficient in using the Onngi wheel to create the large earthenware vessels used to store water and fermented food such as kimchi.    From 2004-2011 Han continued to perfect her ceramic skills before moving to Canada.  On June 3, 2016, five years after arriving on the Canadian prairies, Han graduated with her MFA.  She struggled throughout her graduate studies to find her own voice, somewhere in the middle of being a traditional Korean potter and a new Canadian studying pottery in a Western tradition.  Today she is one of the rising stars in Canadian ceramics.

Since her graduation she has been a resident at the Medalta potteries, her work has been selected for the International Exhibition at Mashiko and was shown at the First Craft Biennale in Toronto.  She has taught for the School of Art at the University of Manitoba.  Her class on onggi making was a huge success.  Han is spending December 2017 in Korea studying reduction cooling in wood firing.

 

 

 

Article I wrote on three Vietnam Era Ceramists appears in Toplerflatt in English!

My good friend Gunter Haltmeyer is charged with the digital layout of the German Potter’s Association journal, Toplerflatt.  He does one fantastic job, and I am always so grateful that the members welcome news of what is happening in Canada.  

The fall/winter edition includes an article I wrote on the work of three Vietnam era ceramic artists who migrated to Canaday.  They are Sally Michener who taught at the Vancouver School of Art (later Emily Carr), Debby Black who taught at George Brown College in Toronto, and Richard Gill who taught at various colleges but he is known mainly for his large and very complicated architectural installations.  

Gunter sent me the PDF and hard copies to share with the ceramists.  Those who read my blog and my Facebook page do not (with the exception of one) belong to this potters association.  I do not want to take away any issues regarding copyright or sales. 

The link is below.  Click on steggles:

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Violence Against Women Day

December 6, 1989, was the day female engineering students at the Ecole Polytechnique were massacred in what is called The Montreal Massacre.  Marc Lepine had a rifle and a knife. He injured twenty-eight; fourteen were killed.  Today is a day of remembrance, not just for those women but for all women who have suffered violence.  In Winnipeg, we mourn the missing Indigenous women.  But every day, women are abused.  It is the time we stood up and demand that the abuse whether it is physical or mental or both STOP.  No more misogyny.  No more sexist jokes.  No more harassment.  Women are intelligent and passionate.  We do not need to do favours for men who have the power to succeed.

Vietnam Era Resisters Research

I received a Canada Council Jean A Chalmers Grant to conduct research into the impact that Vietnam era resisters who came to Canada had on Canadian ceramics.  To date, there are 117 individuals in my study.  Conference presentations have been given in Dublin, at the University of Szeged in Hungary, and at the first Craft Biennale at the Art Gallery of Burlington.  Articles are in press and exhibitions are being planned.  I am still seeking individuals who fit my profile:  came to Canada because they did not wish to be part of the support for the Vietnam War and who were already trained in ceramics or learned after they immigrated in order to make a living.  If you know of someone, please have them contact me at my university e-mail address:  maryann.steggles@umanitoba.ca

The image on today’s posting is Walter Ostrom’s China Bottle.  Ostrom came to Canada because of the Vietnam War in 1969.  He had a contract to teach at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) in Halifax.  Ostrom was elated because he would be teaching at one of the hippest art schools in North America but also because he was going to be living in Canada:  ‘The land of Pierre Trudeau, a friend of both Castro and draft dodgers, leading a nation of peaceniks’.

Good gracious, it is 2020!

This is the post excerpt.

2019 seemed to pass with the blink of an eye.  In late October I was with a very good friend speaking at the UAAC Conference in Quebec City.  Six weeks later I returned to that gorgeous historic city.  Could I live there when I retire?
JA Moisan is the oldest grocery store in North America.  It was founded in 1871.  They have a bakery, a deli, a place for packaged meals to take home, a wall of speciality salts, olive oils, vinegar, Kusmi teas, coffees, candies – you name it!  There is cheese, fresh fruit, and the best croissants in the city.  There is seating for about ten persons.  Stop and rest your feet – have a latte and a croissant or the daily special.  Take home some chocolate.  The interior is the same as it was in the 1920s and 30s.  Soak it in.
Want to be pampered?  After the beginning of November, the Chateau Frontenac has specials.  The hotel is located in the Old City right at the top by the funicular.  Beginning at the end of November to the third week in December, the German market with all of its little wooden stalls stretches from the Frontenac down through this historic part of the City.  The best fish and chips are at either of the pubs on the main drag as you enter the Old City on St. Jean.  One serves Murphy’s while the other serves Guinness – Murphy’s for the Irish, Guinness for the British with a hallway between them linking the two together.  As you wander down the street there is a lovely bookshop with stationary and a good English section as well as a fine cashmere store.  One of the problems for me was that there were just too many ‘tourist shops’ with any and all things made in China as a souvenir for Quebec City.  You see them everywhere!  Sometimes it is difficult to find nice local shops in the middle of all that.
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Every year the Frontenac has a Christmas tree competition.  They were magical!

And there is always a gingerbread house made like the hotel:

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In all of this, I dreamed of returning when it was nice and warm as well as travelling to Scotland in April and then doing a residency in France.  But we now know what happened to all of that – the arrival of COVID-19.

It has been an unexpected gift being isolated because I am now turning my attention back to those amazing potters and ceramic artists who came to Canada during the Vietnam era.  The plan is for more articles and finally the book!  Stay tuned.