Double Cute – the two Little Bobs

Ospreys quite similar to the ones we know today were well established in much of their current breeding range at about the same time our earliest ape-like ancestors left forests and began to walk upright across the plains of Africa.

Alan Poole quoted in D. Gessner, Return of the Osprey, 158.

I could not wait to wake up this morning to check and see how the little Osplets are doing at the Port Lincoln Barge. Yesterday I wondered how you say cute in Osplet – but how do you say double cute? These kids are healthy and strong and by 18:00 necks were held high. No teaching these two what to do when mom gets up and dad delivers a fish, 50 million years of genetics have seen to that!

These images are in reverse order. They go from what I believe is the last feeding in the evening to when the little one was figuring out how to turn around to get some fish. Sorry about that. My mind must be operating in reverse!!! As you go back in time you will notice that the chicks have, in six hours, figured out how to line up for mom so they get some fish. It is nice they are almost the same size. Mom is so patient with these two.

I have left the time stamps on the the top ones, the most recent. Enjoy.

Mom trying to get some rest.

That is a nice fish that dad has brought in.

There were two close feedings together towards the end of the day.

Born with their mouths open like little tiny song birds.

Waiting for Dad.

A much needed rest. Mom will have to sleep as much as she can when those little Bobs are quiet.

This is the 11:54 feeding.

The ‘little’ one got himself straightened up and got some fish but, initially, his head went the opposite direction.

Oh, little one, you need to turn around!

More cuteness. I had so forgotten how incredibly quick these Bobs learn. In a week we will not recognize them from the size and the way they look today with their seemingly black face goggles.

It is now 01:04 in Australia and Mom is having a sleep. Can’t wait to check in on how the two are doing in about six hours. Thank you for joining me. Stay safe everyone.

Thank you to the PLO Project for their streaming cam where I took my screen shots.