Tuesday morning in Bird World

27 September 2022

Good Morning Everyone!

It is clear blue skies on the Canadian Prairies this morning. The temperature when I began this blog was 2 degrees C. There was frost on the roof for the first time this year. The remaining flowers and herbs were not bothered so hopefully the second wave of hummingbirds that will be coming through will have some nectar. The Crows and Blue Jays along with the squirrels are busy collecting corn and peanuts this morning. Little Red has a new suet cylinder so all is well in the garden.

Making News:

Hurricane Ian is beginning to impact the Florida coast. This is the view of one of the Captiva Ospreys earlier this morning. For all of our raptor nests and everyone in this region – as I know so many of my readers are – we are all sending you our warmest thoughts. Stay safe. I will be checking on the Captiva situation throughout the day and evening.

It is currently calm in St Petersburg at the Achieva Osprey nest.

Some wind, which seems to be picking up in gusts, and rain at the nest of Bald Eagles Ron and Rita in the Miami Zoo.

You can hear the wind gusts at the Southwest Florida nest in Fort Myers of M15 and Harriet.

The winds at the Northeast Florida nest of Samson and Gabby appear and sound to be as strong as those at Southwest Florida.

Just checked. The wind speeds at Fort Myers (Harriet and M15) are at 17kph with Jacksonville, home to Samson and Gabby at 18 kph, and Ron and Rita’s nest in Miami at 19 kph. All have rain. We should expect these winds to pick up considerably later in the day.

This is the latest view from the Osprey nest at Captiva. There is one bird on a perch. You will have a front row seat to watch the storm according to the moderator on the cam. Hang on Lena!

Here is the link to the this camera:

Arctic Terns travel 44,000 miles during migration and now, once in the UK, they are met with Avian Flu. A good article that continues to discuss the demise of so many sea birds this year due to this wide spread disease.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/sep/27/country-diary-a-cruel-end-to-an-arctic-terns-epic-travels

Dr Sharpe has boundless energy and his love for raptors is highly infectious. He is now looking to place streaming cam on Alcatraz for one of Grinnell and Annie’s daughters who has been nesting there and raising chicks for a couple of years. The Institute for Wildlife Studies posted this image of Dr Sharpe this morning checking out the situation.

Nest News:

We can all give ‘three cheers’ for Little Bob at the Port Lincoln Osprey nest. At the mid-day feeding, Little Bob had himself right up there in the front row! This does remind me of our dear Ervie and it did take Ervie a couple of days to figure out the ‘sweet spots’ so he could get the most food. This is fantastic. Just look at that little bit of an osplet up there by Middle Bob. Gosh, he is a darling. Big Bob has such a long neck he can reach over both of them but what a tidy trio. It is also nice to see Dad on the nest. What a fantastic family this is.

Little Bob looks so proud of himself.

Dad came in at 1307 with a small headless fish and there was another feeding extremely close to the last one. By the time this feeding was over, all of the chicks were right ready for a good sleep!

The Mum at Melbourne seems to be ‘sitting’ on the eggs differently. Reports out of Melbourne seem to indicate that she is being fed and at one male did stand above the eggs, as if listening, yesterday. A soap opera in Falcon World. We wait but it should not be too long now. There could be pips as I am writing.

The two below appear to be the reigning adults at the Melbourne scrape. The female called simply a falcon (or Mum) has higher horizontal bars on her chest than the male. It is the only way I can tell them apart. Juveniles have vertical bars. The feathers of the female are darker than those of the male or the tiercel and, of course, she is bigger but it is often difficult to tell the size differential unless the pair are close together. I have watched the old male for quite a number of years and this tiercel does not look like him to me.

Mum was doing a lot of ‘looking down’ as if listening to the eggs beginning right after noon yesterday. She is quite beautiful but sure seems to give her ‘most fierce’ look at the camera sometimes.

Now she is being sweet and not so fierce.

It looked as if an eel were brought into the nest in the Sydney Olympic Forest with a wee bit of discord between SE29 and SE30 – but, in the scheme of things – that discord lasted 3 seconds with no pecking. Just a little feisty shuffle. Of course, the adults are watching everything that these two are doing.

Beautiful Diamond. At Orange, the eggs of Xavier and Diamond tend to hatch between 36 and 39 days. That means that the first pip should come on 1 October. As many of you know, the falcon eggs can hatch almost all at once. So 2-3 days. I do hope that these two have a very healthy chick or chicks. ‘A’ and I noticed that both Diamond and Xavier tend to be looking very healthy this year. Fingers crossed.

Thank you so very much for joining me this morning. We are really watching for pips and hatches at Melbourne and keeping our eyes and ears on what Hurricane Ian is doing to the nests within its range. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their posts and streaming cams which form my screen captures: Captiva Ospreys and Window for Wildlife, Achieva Osprey Nest, WRDC, SWFL Eagle Cam and Pritchett Family, NEFL-AEF, NOAA, IWS, Port Lincoln Ospreys, 367 Collins Street by Mirvac, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre Sydney Olympic Park, and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam.

4 Comments

  1. Linda Kontol says:

    Thanks Mary Ann! Lots of Prayers and warm thoughts going out to the birds we follow and their trees and nests. Most of them had just begun rebuilding their nests 🙏Also the people of Florida and all the animals. 🙏
    It sounds like a dangerous hurricane on our news here. Glad all the others are doing good also ❤️ We will be looking forward to the next newsletter.
    Thanks again and take care!
    Linda

    1. You are so welcome and Linda, I was thinking of you, too. Stay safe! It sure sounds like Ian could whip itself up into a category 4. All of you are in our thoughts.

  2. B says:

    Hoping all the birds in the path of Hurricane Ian in Florida can hunker down and be safe ! Thinking of you, Gabby and Samson, Harriet and M15, Ron and Rita, Lina and mate, and all the rest.

    Glad to see Little Bob holding his/her own at Port Lincoln feeding time. Good job, Mum and Dad! SE29 and SE30 are doing so well, and looking forward to falcon hatches at Orange and Melbourne!

    And it would be so awesome if Dr. Sharpe and IWS can get a camera installed on Alcatraz, letting us follow Annie and Grinnell’s daughter Larry (Lawrencium) and her mate!

    Thanks for all the updates, Mary Ann.

    1. You solved the mystery for me…I was fighting with this new computer and the size of the page…yes, Larry! Thank you, B. It would simply be fantastic for a camera to be there and if anyone can do it, Dr Sharpe can and will. He is so determined and caring. Oh, I sure hope those nests and birds stay safe. When Hurricane Ivan tore through Grenada with the resident Caribbean Ospreys, trees were destroyed, houses, roofs of houses everywhere, and the birds were silent – according to my son. It is scary to sit and watch from the view of an osprey nest on Captiva but as they said, it will be a first-hand view of the situation. He isn’t Ervie yet but Little Bob is getting smarter. It sure doesn’t take them long to figure things out if they are allowed. It looks like a very promising nest again this year…knock on wood.

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