Fish deliveries…Tuesday in Bird World

5 September 2023

Good Morning Everyone,

Well, I could not possibly have anticipated what was going to happen but look who showed up at the feeding station today? Just like her Mama Calico.

Yes, the kitten that we could not find. Someone is going to help me trap her! I am not sure that Calico will be pleased. LOL. The kitten is about 62 days old.

This lovely young woman came over with the trap, smelling Sardines, everything to try and get this young lady into the kitten cage and feel safe. Wish us luck!

Calico watching out the garden doors as the trap is being set for her baby. Ironically, Calico’s baby is almost the same size as she is!

Today, Missey and Calico spent the entire day together in the main part of the house with Lewis in the conservatory. They all had poached chicken. We live in hope that soon all three will be integrated along with the kitten, perhaps.

It is 2130. The woman who loaned me the trap is on her way to help me transition the kitten to a kennel. Yes! We have the kitten. It took about three and a half hours. Overjoyed. Overwhelmed.

Osprey World just gets more quiet as the remainder begin their journeys with the last few Dads on the nest feeding chicks.

Harry has been feeding Chirpie again at Alyth today.

Aran was still at Glaslyn.

Blue 022 was seen around Poole Harbour. He left for migration last year on 10 September. No sign of CJ7 or the trio.

Dad brought at least three fish before 1400 to the Minneapolis Landscape Arboretum fledgling on Monday.

Swoop is still at Dunrovin!

Dad is still delivering to Coco at Sandpoint. At least two fish arrived on Monday early in the day.

Bruce is still delivering at Seaside. Oh, they get so excited. I am not sure the kittens are more afraid of the falcons than the ospreys when the latter are screaming for fish arrivals!

One adult on the perch at Boulder. I have not see the juveniles getting fish for several days at the nest.

Fish is still being delivered to an Oyster Bay fledgling.

Fish is being delivered to the Collins Marsh nest in Wisconsin. The juveniles are flying off with their meal!

Di Bennett and Tweed Valley report on the locations of both Poul and Glen. Will Poul stay in Morocco or continue heading south?

Want to know more about migration and how climate and changes in land use in West Africa are impacting UK birds? Have a read.

Mini was at the Osprey platform in Patchogue this morning. She is still favouring that left leg. This time she looked hungry and flew off early to try and get some fish from Dad.

At 1900 Mini flew to the perch. She was coming from the left side of the brewery. She has both feet extended and appears to be drying off her feathers.

The left leg appears to be giving Mini some issues as she holds it up. Hopefully our gal will slow down and rest that leg on the nest.

Good night, Mini.

‘H’ brings us up to date on Molly and Dorsett:


Kent Island – Molly flew to the nest early in the morning, but she didn’t stay long.  She was then not seen on cam for almost twelve hours.  At 1830 Molly flew to the nest, and it was nice to see that she had a huge crop. She seemed to have a lot to say, but she didn’t stay long at that visit either.  SOD’s, Molly.

Barnegat Light – Duke brought four fish to the nest for Dorsett.  What a good Dad!  Around 1830 Dorsett landed on the nest, and she was holding her right foot up a bit.  When she placed the right foot on the nest we could see a small bloody wound on one of her toes.  It seemed to be a minor injury though, as it did not affect her ability to handle the fish Duke delivered at 1901.  She held the fish with her right foot and eventually flew across the cove with the fish.

Gabby and V3 were at the nest in The Hamlet near Jacksonville working for the new season. Gosh, it is so nice to see them! Some worry that V3 might not be up to the job this year but, let’s wait and see. He is a year older and these two look to be bonded. We have no idea what they have been up to off camera.

Thunder and Akecheta were at their old West End nest in the Channel Islands on Monday.

On the Cornell Campus, Big Red and Arthur are up on the ledges of Bradley. So good to see them!

The Sea Eaglets had an early fish breakfast Tuesday morning! Yippeee. ‘A’ reports: “

At WBSE breakfast was early for a change, with Dad bringing in a medium-sized whole fresh fish shortly before 06:39. Lady was straight in. SE32 was slow to get up. Lady started eating herself while SE31 dealt with a PS (medium sized, a little thin but way healthier than yesterday’s) and then headed for the table, where she got the first bites just before 06:41. By 06:42, SE32 is on his feet. He too deals with a (healthy) PS before heading closer to the table. Lady is still feeding SE31. Through most of the feeding, Lady fed first one, then the other. SE31 ate more than SE32 but that was largely because SE32 could not be bothered making a huge effort. When he decided he did want to eat, he quickly shuffled further forward to get himself into prime position and then proceeded to eat a dozen or two bites consecutively. He had another similar bout of eating at the end of the feeding, eating most of the last dozen bites or so. Both eaglets had smallish crops after breakfast, though SE31 had a larger one than SE32. 

Dad brings in another fish soon afterwards, at around 10:52. It looks like a big one. Lady takes a moment or two to arrive at the table, as does SE31. And although SE32 has been sleeping on the table, he is not eager to jump up and rush to start eating. He takes his time. The fish is on the large side of medium and Dad has already eaten the head (and a little more). :Lady takes a couple of minutes to start feeding the eaglets, and by the time she does, at 10:55:20, both are ready and waiting, up at the table, and 0SE32 gets the first bites. This pair are very civilised at meal times over the past week. I have not seen any intimidation of any kind, let alone beaking. They have been absolute angels at the dinner table. SE31 waits patiently until it is her turn for a bite or two, at 10:57. Lady then feeds SE32 almost exclusively. He eats fast and with confidence. He is getting a lot of food in a short period of time. It is after 11:00 when SE31 gets her next proper bite. Lady then feeds the two alternately for a few bites, then returns to feeding SE32. 

Throughout this, SE31 is extremely patient. At no point does she try to steal a bite, push in front of SE32 or in any way intimidate or bonk him. She just waits beside him while he eats. When she is offered a bite, she takes it, but that is all. SE32 has had by far the best of the first half of the feeding, but as the feeding wears on and his crop enlarges yet further, he is less enthusiastic about taking every bite and leaves many of those he is offered for his sister. Over the second half of the feeding, SE31 gets more of the food. By the time the feeding is over, both eaglets have very healthy crops indeed. Both have eaten well, Lady has had a good share of that fish herself, and there was no dispute at all between the eaglets. This nest is just lovely to watch. Even on the days when a single large meal is brought in, no-one really seems to go hungry and there is never any type of unpleasantness between the eaglets. They just play and sleep and snuggle. And wait patiently. SE31 is getting really good up on her feet now and is really enjoying practising her walking and wingercising. SE32 is quite a few days behind, as he spent a while cowering while SE31 was growing into her changing body, as it were. He will catch up soon, but for now, he is still very ungainly and often needs his wings for balance.”

Mum and Dad incubate their egg at 367 Collins Street for a few minutes. Looking for egg 2!

Xavier and Diamond are incubating their three eggs at Orange.

At Port Lincoln, mating continues – not always successful.

‘A’ reports that there is action in NZ. Four of the Royal Albatross chicks have now fledged. She also adds, “Poor UQ chick has come down from his hilltop nest to sleep next to Manaaki (who was asleep when he arrived, so may be surprised to see him there when he wakes up). I am pretty sure UQ is seeking either safety in numbers or simply a safer distance between himself and Miss NTF higher up the hill. She is a very pushy and precocious female and has made UQ’s life more than a little difficult, given he is a somewhat shy and reticent albie. He gets on well with Manaaki, though, so obviously feels better down there than up on his hill. So cute, the two of them. As I said, there are two male and two female chicks whose nests we can see (or almost see) around Manaaki. Miss NTF has taken a fancy to the camera, which Manaaki regards as his, so there have been several altercations over the camera, with much clacking of beaks. She thinks she rules the hilltop but Manaaki has other ideas. These four have been an absolute joy to watch these past seven months, each with a very distinctive personality (and, as I mentioned the other day, each currently has a very different ‘hairstyle’ in regard to where each chick wears their remaining fluff – one of the chatters did a cartoon of all the chicks with all their hairstyles about a week ago – very accurate and just TOO funny).”

The third osplet at Osprey House in Australia has died of siblicide.

Thank you so much for being with us today. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their notes, posts, videos, and streaming cams that helped me to write my blog today: ‘A, H’, Alyth, Bywyd Gwylld Glaslyn, Jeff Kear, Mary Kerr and Glaslyn Osprey Group, Poole Harbour Ospreys, MN Landscape Arboretum, Dunrovin Ranch, Sandpoint, Seaside, Boulder County, PSEG, Collins Marsh, Tweed Valley, Scottish Wildlife Trust, Kent Island, Wildlife Conserve F of NJ, NEFL-AEF, IWS/Explore, Suzanne Arnold Horning and Cornell Hawk Chatters Club, Sydney Sea Eagles, 367 Collins Street by Mirvac, and PLO.

Leave a Reply