Name the Eagle, Connick’s Crop Popping, and the Es eat…Friday in Bird World

3 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

Remember to head over to the streaming cam of Kistachie National Forest Bald Eagle Nest E3 to vote on 02’s name! Here are the choices…let’s make sure little one gets a great name!

I saw this and simply had to share it with everyone. Or maybe it isn’t that funny. I do love Condor humour!

Making News:

Little Boots is 20 days old today. He looks so young. With good care and good food, he will catch up we hope.

Just look at that sweet face. Little Boots is in care. As everyone noticed, he was extremely weak in the nest. Let us hope that he can be stabilised and that apparent feet and leg deformities can be repaired by the loving folks down in Houston at the Wildlife Center of Texas.

Here is the posting. I would like to draw your attention to “nest cam footage showed him to be struggling to sit up and move around in the nest, impairing his chances for survival.” There is the perfect wording to get help for an eagle on a nest that is not thriving. I am impressed. Nothing caused by a human just good old compassion and perhaps some monofilament line in that egg cup.

If you are interesting in donating for little Boots care, please do so. Here is the information. I went on line and went to their website: Wildlife Centre of Texas. It was quick and easy. Go Boots!

A British Columbia juvenile Bald Eagle got itself into some mischief and is being flown to OWL.

Continuing with the issues raised in the movie The Albatross, young people are doing amazing drawings. Will this make them better environmental citizens? How many of us can take a pledge to stop using plastic? Let’s try it. Maybe it will catch on like a bad cold.

‘A’ wondered what it would take to get rid of those plastic gyros in the oceans. Certainly people have tried various methods. And we know from The Flight of the Osprey that countries are having a hard time dealing with plastic…so, let’s just not buy anything with plastic. Do it a day at a time. It is frightening what we have done with our oceans. I remember when I first moved to Southern Manitoba eons ago and I wanted to purchase a cream separator. People laughed. They were hard to clean and they just shoved them down the river bank. I kid you not. Out of sight, out of mind — like the oceans.

In my province, groups are joining forces around Brandon to build nesting boxes for Bluebirds! Wow. What a great idea.

Some of you will remember that the adult Ospreys were chased off their platform at the Cape Henlopen State Park last year. The male was killed. The female appears, from the announcement, to be alive. The three osplets starved to death on the nest in front of viewers and were carried off by the intruders. It was a tragedy that tore our hearts out. Well, there is a new platform going up!

And yet another story about lead poisoning. Seriously lead is something that could happen rather quickly if there was a will. Continue to lobby everyone you can. Take 15 minutes or 30 minutes one day and send an e-mail to your elected officials. Get others to join in. Tell them no more lead. And how about adding plastic to that, too?

Now something to give us hope. A good news story about a Bald Eagle in rehab for 6 months being released. YES!

Zoe continues to explore the area around Mt Hope. She has also started heading south…will she return to the barge? That would be a bit crazy. Let us all hope she is finding her wings and some fish!

Checking on the nests:

I do not see any Osprey eggs at either Achieva or Captiva on Thursday.

At the Captiva Eagle nest, little Connick is such a darling.

Oh, just look at these later images. Connick really likes to spread out and sleep….and two proud parents!

What a great image of the three – Clive, Connie, and Connick.

At 16:55 Connick had a huge crop!

It looks like the parents are smiling at Connick with his almost ready to pop crop. Their baby has grown and thrived.

There must be a fishing contest at the lake near Superbeaks. It is only mid-afternoon and PePe has brought in 8 fish! Yes, you read that correctly. 8 fish to the nest for Pearl and Tico (and of course, the rest of the family, Mum Muhlady). PePe you better eat some of these fish if you aren’t eating the heads!

It’s a gorgeous day out in California at Jackie and Shadow’s nest. The question of the day was: What was the name of Jackie’s former mate? Do you know? It was Mr B. Shadow landed on the nest and wanted the nest and Jackie and wouldn’t leave — Shadow got them both! That was 2018 after Jackie and Mr B’s fledgling, Stormy, had flown. The three of them could not persuade Shadow to leave…oh, you gotta love this guy.

Do you realise that pip watch will begin on 15 February? That is only 12 days away!!!!!!!!!!!

Are Harriet and M15 moving E21 and 22 into another phase of training to be an independent eagle? No good food left on the nest just what looks to be pieces of a dried up catfish. 22 was pecking on that. Then sadly, 22 got up to the table first with 21 moving up and 22 went into submission. Things seem terribly wrong on this nest but, it is Harriet and M15. They are pros and they want their eaglets to thrive. So are we to think of this lack of food and little pieces as a teaching moment? Not every day will see a full crop. But, let’s do keep an eye. It is worrying a lot of people.

You can see the primary feathers coming in on that outstretched wing. Note the milky transparent tube – the quill – that holds the blood feather. One of the reasons that eaglets preen so much is to release the feather from that transparent quill.

Now we all know that 22 is a bit of a stinker…let’s watch and see what Harriet and M15 do tomorrow. Certainly no peace today and 22 was crying for food and hoping to get some that M15 brought in. In fact, every time that 22 even tried to eat that old dried fish, 21 started beaking its younger sibling. 22 is quick to go into submission. So what has set 21 off? Is it the lack of food on the nest? Again, let us see what tomorrow brings. Harriet has never lost an eaglet. Never. In fact, there could be a windfall of food on the nest tomorrow – just like there is in the wild – some days there is too much food and for many others, nothing.

Ah, there is food this morning, Friday. Both Es have a crop. 21 ate first with 22 in submission and then 22 was fed and had a nice crop. Let us all take a big sigh of relief.

Lady Hawk caught 22 walking Thursday – hey, a giant step!

Gabby and V3 are a gorgeous couple. 18:24 Thursday evening on the nest together.

And last another Canadian story but not about Bluebirds this time…it is from David Hancock and the Surrey Bald Eagle Nest. Two new bonded eagles working with a meal and a stick. Have another laugh as we wait to hear how Boots is doing.

Thank you so much for being with me today. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, posts, tweets, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: ‘A’ Sherri van Syckel and California Condor Recovery Group, KNF, Wildlife Centre of Texas, Heather Simms and the Webster Texas Eagle Watchers, Terry Carman and the Bald Eagle Live Nest Cams and News, Joyce Hartmann and the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatross and Petrels, Brandon Sun, Friends of Cape Henlopen State Park, MLive.com, JET/FOX/YourErie, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Achieva Credit Union, Window to Wildlife, Superbeaks, FOBBV, SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, Lady Hawk and SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, NEFL Bald Eagles and the AEF, and the Dave Hancock Wildlife Foundation.

WTE spends a year living in wild with only one foot, Bonnie and Clyde are back…Wednesday in Bird World

1 February 2022

It is a new month and the shortest one of the year! It is -28 C in Winnipeg. The kittens spent some time enjoying the sunshine in the conservatory watching the birds today. Oh, what joy they bring — and of course, the birds and the squirrels.

Missy is the alpha cat – the boss. She gets the little house on the cat tree.

Lewis thinks he is ‘Kingpin’ on the top. Too funny. Missy looks sweet. She could make mincemeat out of Lewis at any time of day — if her gentle nature got stressed. So far, so good. She has even taken over his drawer in the console cabinet once or twice this week.

Lots of things starting to happen…the GHO couple that stole the Bald Eagle nest in 2021, skipped 2022, and are back this year with their first egg laid on Tuesday 31 January. A White-tail eagle lives a year successfully with only one along…wow.

In the Mailbox and Making News:

Geemeff sent me the link to this amazing story. Thank you, Geemeff! Before you go to the blog of Tim Mackrill and I do recommend reading it for the full story – stop for a moment and consider that this White-tailed Eagle has been living for at least a year without a foot.

If you work at a wildlife rehab facility, I urge you to print this up or send the link to the vets. Maybe it is time – in memory of our dear WBSE 26 – and all the others – that life can be full with one talon and the birds should be given a chance! Not a needle.

Copy and paste the link into your browser to read the blog if it doesn’t open up for you.

Birding. Often if you want to see birds, you wind up going to places you never dreamed…sewage treatment plants, industrial estates, garbage dumps and landfills. You may recall the stories and my blog about the Adjutant General in Assam or tales of the storks in Portugal or Spain. Well, here in Winnipeg, the Bald Eagles that have their nest at our nature centre frequent ‘the dump’ just a mile away.

EJ sent this link if you live around Boston’s Logan landfill:

https://www.kbzk.com/news/local-news/bald-eagles-flock-to-logan-landfill

I was very interested in a local mail out from our wildlife rehabber. For the first time, they have included ‘dogs’ in the pie chart of the causes of injuries to wildlife. It is more than cats! Indeed, dogs are the highest for our local wildlife. Wonder what it is where you live?

A bird charity in the UK has been locked out of its accounts. The bird is the Woodcock. Go figure.

The use of AI is causing problems on numerous social media outlets. Everyone is complaining. Isn’t that just the cutest little bird?

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-norfolk-64451977?fbclid=IwAR2DGee2pUMFSSTnp2RnlUgH0nNw0lvchlHNDjIPja9BjLHFhu07u2MSw_g

The US EPA has vetoed the proposed Pebble mine in Bristol Bay Alaska that would have the potential of polluting the pristine waters that the Alaskan salmon enjoy. Ironically, I do not connect – in my head – the Alaskan Salmon with people’s meals but, with the Bald Eagles who thrive on it.

That said, if all of the agencies, around the world, were to enforce all clean air and water laws the world would be a better place for all of us – our feathered friends included. Today, for example, you cannot go and see wildlife at the Barbados Wildlife Reserve because raw sewage has been allowed to be dumped by neighbours to the sanctuary and it has created a biohazard area in the Mangroves.

Reports of raw sewage being poured into the water around the world is, sadly, becoming more and more of an occurrence. Band together with local groups and have a win like they did in Alaska — there will be no Pebble Mine!

https://www.hcn.org/articles/north-mining-the-epa-vetoed-alaskas-proposed-pebble-mine?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2023-01-31-Newsletter

‘L’ sent a link to a wonderful article about the decorative birdhouses in Turkey. She has seen them on her travels. Perhaps you have, too. The rest of us can enjoy the beautiful images in the following article. Thanks, ‘L’.

BIrdNote.org. https://www.amusingplanet.com/…/the-decorative…

Audubon has launched its bird migration explorer so you can follow species as they begin their trips from their winter homes to their spring and summer breeding grounds.

https://explorer.audubon.org/home?ms=digital-eng-email-ea-x-engagement_20230201_eng-email_bme-mobile-update&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=engagement_20230201_eng-email&utm_content=bme-mobile-update&legend=collapse&zoom=3&x=1306099.1620122588&y=2810864.562197212

At the Nests:

First up. Remember the GHO pair that fought for and won the Bald Eagle nest on Farmer Derek’s property in Kansas? Well, guess who is back incubating the egg she laid this morning? Oh, yes, none other than Bonnie!

https://www.youtube.com/live/MRMzzjyumHs?feature=share

Oh, Sally and Harry have only two eggs at the Moorings Osprey nest. Can you see me jumping up and down for joy? Can you imagine if every nest only had 2 eggs??????? I would have nothing to do and that would be just fine.

Want to have a nervous breakdown quickly? because of a raptor? Just go over to visit Connick at the Captiva Bald Eagle nest! Connick had more of his body over the edge than inside. Sound asleep. Not a care in the world.

Adults working away on the nest burying that egg.

Connie managed to lure Connick back into the nest with some fish! Thank goodness. If that eaglet had wiggled the wrong way… OK. Everything is fine. Let’s not go there.

Connick is shaded by Mum Connie. By 1400 it is really hot on the nest.

It was a beautiful morning over at Superbeaks. The eagles were up early doing some self-feeding and then the adults begin to come in with some fresh prey. They still love feeding their babies…ha, ha. Babies. Big turkeys now. Pearl is 54 days old and Tico is 53.

The Superbeaks kids have been hot, little Connick was just panting and panting to stay cool and then getting cool with the aid of Mum. Imagine then what would it be like in Miami if Ron and Rose had chicks this late. Well, they have to lay the eggs first and then it is 35 days… I wonder? They are still working on that nest.

It is certainly a nice nest..my goodness, one of the nicest I have seen. Not many thought Ron Magill’s Papadum Chair nest would be accepted and ‘work’ for an eagle family but it proved itself last year. And, of course, there are three 2 week fertile periods so there is still a chance for eggs. Surely the eagles know better than I do whether to have eggs or not. Just seems like it would be awfully hot.

It is certainly not clear about the two eaglets at Webster Texas – Ringo, the eldest, and Boots, the tiny second hatch. Yesterday, Ringo got all the food til later in the day and finally, when I thought little Boots was too weak (it has been hot there) to eat, it got a full feeding and a full crop. Relief of sorts. It is hot. Did I say that several times. Boots has to be hydrated. Should be getting food every couple of hours he is so tiny, not once a day. But he ate. Send positive wishes to our little one.

Ringo with a huge crop. Mum reaches down to start feeding Boots.

Rhonda A caught the two eaglets of Alex and Andria working those wings yesterday after the rain and during the drizzle. Go Valentine! Go 02!

More flapping by Valentine!

Jackie and Shadow are really having to be careful during Tuesday. The Ravens are about. Shadow stays on the nest for some time while they each get a turn to eat some of the fish that Shadow brought in earlier on Monday.

At the nest of Gabby and V3 near St Petersburg, V3 was at the nest but as of 1600 Tuesday, Gabby has not been there today. Don’t think these two will be raising eaglets this year. Gabby might decide it is a good time to head on vacation when it starts getting really hot! Will V3 be the male of choice next year? We simply have to wait and see.

Gracie Shepherd caught E21, Harriet and M15’s oldest eagle this year standing up and walking – and using its wings for balance. Gosh, lots of eaglets working those legs these days (Alex and Andria’s, too and, of course, Tico and Pearl).

Zoe. I have to admit that I am quite nervous about our girl. This was the posting the 31st in Australia and they were hoping for a 2100 check in last night. Nothing so far. There is always the possibility of being out of phone range or the transmitter not working which would be a real issue if you want to track your recent fledgling. I wonder if anyone has gone to check the last transmission point? It is now after 1500 on 1 February in Port Lincoln and still no posting of a transmission for Zoe. I hope there are boots on the ground searching for our girl.

Thank you so much for being with me today. This has been a spin around the nests with a few twists. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their notes, their posts, their videos, announcements, tweets, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures for this blog: Geemeff, ‘EJ’, Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation, KBZK, Wildlife Haven, BBC, HCN, Amusing Planet, Audubon, Farmer Derek, Moorings Park Ospreys, Window to Wildlife, Superbeaks, WRDC, Paul White and the Wester Eagle Watchers, Rhonda A and KNF-E3, FOBBV, NEFL-AEF, Gracie Shepherd and SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, and the Port Lincoln Ospreys and Friends of Osprey.

Superbeaks are Super…Tuesday Morning in Bird World

31 January 2022

If my father was alive today, it would be his birthday. So grateful for his love of the animals and birds that frequented our garden as a child and all the things he taught me.

It is still cold in Manitoba. We are still in the extreme cold warning but…it is only -21 C. Because of the strong winds it will be nearly -40 if you count in the chill factor and they are asking people to stay inside if it is possible. Cars do not like to start in cold weather like this. Some people have ‘plugs’ that heat the oil. The maker of my car will not install those nor the automatic starters so that you can let your car run and get warm before you go and jump in. And many of us, myself included, do not have garages having opted for larger garden spaces. So…it is cold out there. We bundle up in coats that are mid-calf and rated to -40. Boots are lined as well and there are all new materials to help keep people warm that are light weight. We manage. In fact, I function much better in the colder temperatures, like the eagles, than in the extreme heat that I loved as a younger person.


Making News:

It looks like Glen Blue 708 got tired of travelling and has decided it is beach life in Morocco for him!

The names of 2022’s year old Kakapo are coming in.

There appears to be ‘some hope’ for Annie and Grinnell’s Sequoia and Sasha.

Most of us outside of the UK don’t understand the ‘power’ behind the shooting estates that allow their gamekeepers to stomp on Goshawk chicks or shoot the Hen Harriers. Here is a good read.

Checking on Our Nests:

The new guy is definitely not a Grinnell and hardly an Alden. Not sure….

It is quite the snowy day for Jackie and Shadow at Big Bear. On occasion you can hear one or more of those cantankerous Crows/Ravens that have been coming to the nest and trying to distract the adults so that they can get to those precious eggs.

It has been hot in Florida. All of the eaglets have been panting today. Poor Connick when it got out of Connie’s shade, the wee one was huffing and puffing keeping cool. It was mid-afternoon and the little one with its clown feet and soft thermal down was panting really hard.

At 15:37 Connie gets Connick up to have some fish to hydrate itself.

As the sun sets on the barrier islands of Florida, it is a good thing to remember that the eagles actually ‘do better’ physically in the colder weather than in the extreme heat.

Teeny weeny Boots at the Webster Texas Bald Eagle nest is getting some fish. Ringo always eats first and then little Boots.

Most everyone watches and many report on Harriet and M15 so I don’t always – unless there is a big change and there was last evening. E21 and E22 slept alone in the nest together after having a tandem feeding by Mum and Dad.

In Louisiana, it was drizzling again on Monday with a 45% chance of rain, again.

Anna keeps little E03 dry. It is rather hard to imagine but E03 fit into that size of egg only 23 days ago.

Anna has found a new way to keep her baby dry.

At the E3 nest of Alex and Andria, Valentine is walking and getting steadier by the day.

Then little siblings say, ‘Hey, I can do that walking thing, too!’

Pa Berry and Missy could not be more proud. B16 is doing so well – the cutie pie Rollie Mollie is getting to that sort of ‘lanky’ stage. Still adorable. There are at least 3 rabbits on that nest if not 4 today.

We all hope that everyone of these little eaglets grows up to be big and strong like Pearl and Tico. What a pair these two are. I love the way they look at one another.

Tico takes a bow in front of Pearl as he ends his wingersizing display.

As the sun goes down in Central Florida, Muhlady is making sure that both Pearl and Tico are full to the brim before bed. I wonder if the parents begin to sense how much longer they have with their babies????

As the sun sets in St Petersburg, there are no eggs yet at the Achieva Osprey nest of Jack and Diane.

No eggs at Captiva for Mabel and Angus. They have been working on the rails today and keeping alert as there appear to be intruders in the area.

I still see only two eggs at the Moorings Park Osprey Platform in Naples, Florida this evening and around 2100. Will there be three when we wake up tomorrow morning? Believe me, I hope not.

The award for the most romantic of the birds today goes to L and GLY, the Royal Albatrosses! Goodness. Ranger Sharyn says that we might expect more frequent turn overs as it becomes difficult for the adults to find enough food for them and the chick so they are in and out, in and out. That little one is like doubling its weigh. Did anyone say ‘big boy’? Of course, I thought Lillibet was a big boy, too. So don’t trust me about genders of albatross!!!!!!!! That is a fact.

Thank you so very much for being with me this last day of January. February is short. Richmond’s Rosie should be returning from her migration around Valentine’s Day. Something to look forward to and then…5-6 weeks for UK Osprey arrivals…4 weeks til Big Red lays her first egg. Oh, lots to look forward to. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures and blog: Conservation without Borders, Kakapo Recover, HIT, San Jose City Hall, SK Hideaways and Cal Falcons, FOBBV, Window to Wildlife, Paul White and the Webster TX Eagle Cam Watchers, SWFlorida Eagles and D Pritchett, KNF-E1, KNF-E3, Berry College Eagle Cam, Superbeaks, Moorings Park Ospreys, NZ-DOC and Cornell, Elain and NZ DOC and Cornell.

Ervie enjoys a festival, Annie gets treats…Friday in Bird World

27 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

It is late Thursday and snow is falling gently in the garden. Everyone on the Canadian Prairies is preparing themselves for the Polar Vortex that is set to arrive sometime Friday evening. It will keep us in very frigid temperatures for about a fortnight. So tonight it is -7 but it will be dipping down to -24 C tomorrow with strong winds, then into the -30s. I will be fine but this has to be a shock to the birds outside. There were more than 40 Starlings today at the feeders along with about 60 or more Sparrows. The squirrels were out as well eating as much as they could. It has to be so difficult for them.

The kittens are, of course, fine. Lewis likes to snuggle in with all the textiles in a drawer and Missy is drawn to sleeping in large plant pots. At times these are the strangest kittens I have ever had the privilege to share my life with. They are adorable characters!


In the Mailbox:

A request has come in to remind everyone that if they have Dark-Eyed Juncos visiting their gardens to please put seed, particularly Millet, on the ground for them. They are ground feeders! Thank you.

Making News:

There is news coming of Ervie from Fran Solly and Friends of Osprey. I haven’t seen a tracking for Ervie for awhile so this was such a treat. There is apparently a big festival with helicopter rides where he normally fishes so he went some where else to get his meals but, Fran notes that he also hung around to watch some of the people at the festivities. Relief.

Some people are just discovering how beneficial birdwatching is to human health!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/27/birdsong-boosts-mental-wellbeing-for-90-of-people-uk-poll-finds?CMP=share_btn_link

Great news coming out of University of California at Berkeley. Drones are banned from the campus area where Annie raises her family. Thank you so much!

Denial, watering-down terms to make horrific acts like stomping five Goshawk chicks to death palatable. When will it stop? When will people come to their senses that the persecution of raptors is not OK.

Kakapo that went into care have responded positively and will soon be returning home. Great news.

The tiny eaglet that was found with some puncture wounds at the base of its nest tree has responded well to the treatment given by CROW. The sad news is that the nest where it was to be returned has been taken over by GHOs. (Did those owls attack other nestlings? the parents? Did I say I am not a fan of GHOs after Harriet and M15’s ongoing issues). Poor baby will be raised by loving hands. And will probably never be able to be released. So little. Just look at the egg tooth. This eaglet is going to take considerable resources. If you can, think of sending a small donation for its care – you can specify that it goes to this baby’s care. Someone will be feeding it non-stop during the day just like its parents would. Sweetness.

At the nests:

If you missed it, CE9 has been named Connick after Connor and Nick at Window to Wildlife. They did all the work getting the cams and platforms back up for the eagles enabling all of us to be able to watch the Captiva Eagles, Connie and Clive, and the Ospreys, Mabel and Angus. Great choice!

The feeding that started in the image above resulted in a huge crop for Connick.

The snow that was falling last evening at the MN-DNR (Minnesota Department of Natural Resources) Bald Eagle nest has melted. When the camera was running this morning I could hear ducks and geese. Then the camera rotated and showed us a great place for the eagles to get their prey – absolutely close to the nest!

Both Nancy and her mate were at the nest doing some work.

The snow was also gone at the Berry College nest of Pa and Missy. That little B16 is such a cutie and it is working those wings to balance itself trying to get out of the nest cup already! This little one is strong and is going to be a handful. The other egg is not viable. There is rabbit, squirrel, and fish on the menu thanks to Pa’s great hunting.

The snow is also gone from Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ. Mum is rolling the two eggs.

Jack and Diane continue to visit the Achieva Osprey nest in St Petersburg. No eggs yet. Soon.

All of those nests are great. I just about had a heart attack today when I saw Pearl at the Superbeaks nest back up to ‘ps’ and she just about slipped off the edge. It was a hold your breath moment. The railings are gone around that left branch – or so it seems. I cannot see. Pearl immediately got her grip and moved forward.

It is hard to imagine but little B16 will be this size in 35 days!

The wings are being exercised.

Pearl is gorgeous.

Alex delivered a fish and Andria went to help defend him and the nest against an intruder! There are so many intruders I am surprised that the males ever make it to the nests with prey for their families.

Things settled down. E01 and E02 are growing and growing like bad weeds. Remember to go on chat tomorrow at noon CT and put in a name suggestion for 01. It might make it to the finals.

Right now it is easy to tell the two eaglets apart. 01 has many more dark juvenile feathers.

02 has a nice crop that was revealed after that stretch. Looks like a real butterball sitting there.

The little one at the KNF E1 nest benefits from being an only eaglet. No one to share that fish with but Mum!!!!!! And Anna does love her fish dinners.

Anna loves to make sure that 03 has its crop full to the brim. Just one last bite, sweetie.

Gabby and V3 were in and out of the nest on Thursday. These screen captures were taken around noon.

SK Hideaways caught the new guy bringing Annie a gift! Oh, thank you, new guy!!!!!! It’s a Starling and Annie doesn’t flinch…she doesn’t mind Starlngs. Only a brief tug-o-war. Remember…Diamond hates them. So hopeful for about three eggs in Annie’s scrape and three very active eyases. That will keep the ‘new guy’ busy.

Remember to go on chat at the KNF E3 nest tomorrow, Friday until noon on Saturday to propose a name for 01. The rangers will take the entries down to 3 and have a public vote. I missed the Ventana Wildlife chat today about the condors because I could not sign on to their Zoom. The link will be posted sometime on Friday to the archived event and I will include it in Saturday’s blog. Those are always informative sessions. We wait for Osprey eggs.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Please take care of yourself. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, announcements, posts, tweets, videos, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Fran Solly and Friends of Osprey, The Guardian, Cal Falcons, Raptor Persecution UK, Kakapo Recover and the Wildlife Hospital – Dunedin, CROW, Window to Wildlife, MN-DNR, Berry College, Duke Farms, Achieva Credit Union, Superbeaks, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, NEFL-AEF, and SK Hideaways and Cal Falcons.

If you would like to receive a copy of my daily blog, please feel free to sign up. We would love to have you as one of our feathered family. I try to send one blog per day so as not to overload your inbox. Sometimes there are two if something is happening. There are no ads, no fees. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Remembering Sue and Otto intruders everywhere…Thursday in Bird World

26 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

I hope that the ‘almost’ end of the week is looking good for all of you.

Thank you for your notes about the kittens. They are doing great. There are times I wonder if I will survive! My entire house looks like a kitten day care!!!!!! They prefer boxes and paper shopping bags to any kind of toy from the pet store. They want to sleep in baskets with soft blankets, on top of tables with soft blankets, and in drawers. I am trying to remember to cut all those handles – and you should, too. They can get their necks through them. They have been playing with this bag for a couple of weeks now. Taking turns being inside and out. It is just about torn to shreds! Lewis always appears to be chewing on something and Missey is always a darling – oh, no, she never causes any mischief! Never! LOL.

In the News:

Sue and Otto are remembered. It is a lovely article about this adored pair of Red-tail Hawks. In it, I also note that they are giving different days for the birds death. I will try and confirm which is correct.

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2023/01/25/remembering-su-sue-and-otto-syracuse-universitys-resident-hawk-pair/.

A Place called Hope – one of my all-time favourite wildlife rehabilitation centres – is asking for help. Unusual donations. They want more specimens of raptors killed by rodenticide and lead. They are gathering evidence so that a bill can be passed in Connecticut to stop the sale of both rodenticides and lead. Do you work at a centre that can help? And even if you don’t, read the request. It is shocking how many deaths there are so quickly….we need to stop this, we need to help our raptors.

The faces of some of those affected and some who have died due to rat poison and lead.

The joy I felt at seeing Cattle Egrets, in the pastures and small allotments in Grenada following the goats and cows, is hard to describe. Imagine being a farmer in the UK, changing your way of doings things to bring health to your land, and now you have cattle egrets! Just imagine how thrilling – a sign of a healthy space.

The article below gives a good history of the cattle egret. It is a really good read while demonstrating that biodiversity can work if we make the effort to change our practice. “Numbers of cattle egrets are booming in Britain, boosted by wildlife-friendly farming where cows are grazed on gentle rotations designed to improve soil quality and boost invertebrate populations.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/25/cattle-egrets-uk-wildlife-friendly-farms-have-had-a-few?CMP=share_btn_link

In Melbourne, scientists are wondering if a change in climate is the cause for the rise of the ‘devil bird’ in Melbourne’s suburbs. If you live in Melbourne, have you seen one of these?

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/26/unusual-sightings-of-devil-bird-across-melbourne-raise-migration-mysteries-for-researchers?CMP=share_btn_link

We don’t get to see the Layman Albatross nesting on Kauai, Hawaii on streaming cams, only through the postings of Hob Osterlund. Thank you, Holly Parsons, for this re-post on the hatch of the little Moli.

A Sanibel eaglet that fell out of its nest now has been adopted and has its forever home. Congratulations!

In the Nests:

Louis and Anna’s little chick is doing fantastic. Oh, they had a soggy start to Wednesday after the storms pushed through the area but, everyone is fine.

Cody got the camera up and running at the E3 nest. Thank you Cody! You can really tell the difference between E01 and E03 now. E01 being the one with the most juvenile feathers. It feels like it happened overnight!

Just look at how well those eaglets are camouflaged in that nest. Both have serious crops from being well fed.

Coot is still on the menu. There must be an absolute abundance of Coots on Kincaid Lake this time of year.

02 is stretching its wings much to the curiosity of big sibling. They both have fuzzy Mohawks and you can see the feathers coming in along with those huge feet!

There is information on the chat roll for both KNF-E1 and KNF-E3 about naming 01 which I am presuming can only be Alex and Andria’s 01 chick from the E3 nest. “We will have a 24hour poll to name O1 on Friday the 27th starting at noon and ending on Saturday the 28th at noon. 3 names will be selected by local Forest Service employees then voted on in the chat.” Send in a name…give that little eaglet something to wear proudly all its life. Mark your calendars..this Friday til noon Saturday to come up with a great name. Then the 3 finalists.

It really was a scary time. On the 24th of January the Ravens came to the nest of Jackie and Shadow. Shadow came to the rescue. How terrifying for Jackie! The Eagles have to be constantly vigilant against Ravens and like Harriet and M15, the GHOs. Those Ravens know that Jackie has two precious eggs and they want them!

Here is another view of the threat by the Ravens.

Ranger Sharyn comes by and does a weight check on Sweet Pea. That is one of the nicknames that the South Plateau chick has at the moment. There will be a naming contest after the middle of February when all of the eggs have hatched. I wonder what the name will be? Names become important – they often help us to remember the birds easier than if they have a number. Scientific studies have also shown that our attachment to the wildlife/raptors/sea birds is more intense if they have a name. I am all for whatever it takes to help people care – and to help others to understand how important it is to care for these beautiful birds – all of them – before it is too late.

I am reposting one of Sharon Dunne’s screen captures of L and GLY together during the changeover. Just a gorgeous couple. Thank you, Sharon.

‘A’ sent me the link to this video capturing the moment that GLY sees his chick for the first time. Thanks, A!

The feedings for CE9 continue to go well. The little eaglet has responded in kind by growing and growing! CE9 is sweetness in a tiny bundle. So glad this little one is thriving.

Oh, sweetness in a food coma.

At 12:47:21 Clive feeds Connie and Connie feeds CE9. Precious. CE9 just wants lunch not fooling around parents!!!!!! This little eaglet will have its name today!!!!!! Wonder what it will be?

The last meal of the day at Captiva as the sun sets.

You may have also noticed that Connie continues to bury the unviable egg in the nest now.

The weather forecasts do not look good. The winds are really starting to pick up at Pa Berry and Missy’s nest in Georgia. B16 remains a beautiful little energetic fluff ball. There is some speculation that B16 is actually the second egg hatching at 36 days. Second eggs tend to hatch earlier than first due to delayed incubation. Chatters note that this would be in line with hatching last year also. One wonderful eaglet is fine.

Missy is making sure that the hatches are tight so little B16 is warm and dry. I would love to see these eagle nests catch a break one year from the snow and ice…we will see what happens later today and tomorrow as that system sweeps through the US.

The ospreys at Achieva have been mating and alerting from the nest. Are we going to see eggs in the next week?

The cam operator gave us some very good close ups at the Superbeaks nest this morning. Pearl is 49 days old and Tico is 48 days old today.

Texas already had the storms and the tornadoes and thankfully, the Webster Bald Eagles are just fine! Ringo and Boots up and eating well. Thankful for small miracles as there were no less than 14 confirmed tornadoes in Texas on the 24th.

Nancy and her mate were at the MN-DNR nest working on getting things ready for eggs.

They were working on the rails today.

The predicted snow is starting to fall on the Mum at Duke Farms and her egg. Oh, this poor dear. I remember a couple of years ago her being buried under snow. They survive of course but, it is so hard to watch. We just want to help them and ease any misery and pain they might have.

The snow and winds have hit Iowa and the precipitation is accumulating on both the nests at Decorah.

So far, the snow has not reached Pittsburgh and the US Steel Bald Eagle nest.

There are a lot of intruders. Harriet has had to defend the nest and now Bella is having to defend the NCTC nest. Stay safe, Bella. We do not want a repeat of last year where you were injured and gone for nearly 3 weeks.

Heading to Australia to check to see if Zoe is on the barge nest and yes, there she is. Zoe is 131 days old on Thursday in Australia. Yesterday Mum brought her one fish. I wonder if there will be any deliveries today. It is 1500 and I see no deliveries yet – unless I missed something. Zoe looks remarkably well fed and in good health.

Diamond was in the scrape box on the waterpower of the Charles Sturt University in Orange. It is now 15:21 and Indigo has not been seen or heard so far today.

Thank you so very much for being with us today. Please take care. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, videos, announcements, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: ‘A’, A Place Called Hope, The Guardian, Holly Parsons Albatross Lovers FB and Hob Osterlund, Terry carman and Bald Eagles Live Nest Cams and New and WAVY.COM KNF-E1 and E3, FOBBV, Lady Hawk and NZ DOC, Sharon Dunne and Royal Cam Albatross Group NZ and NZ DOC, Window to Wildlife, Berry College, Achieva Credit Union, Superbeaks, Paul White and the Webster TX Eagle Group, MN-DNR, Duke Farms, Raptor Resource Project and Explore.org, Pix Cams, Deb Stecyk and the NCTC, and Port Lincoln Ospreys.

If you would like to be a member of our bird loving family, we would love to have you join us. There is normally one posting per day unless there is some big excitement. I try hard not to load up your inbox. No ads, no fees. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Cute little butterball babies…Wednesday in Bird World

25 January 2022

Good Morning to Everyone!

It is almost the end of January. Just a few more days. It is cold today. -21 C. Bright beautiful sun, though.

There are countdowns ongoing and contests beginning to start on when the UK Ospreys will return. Then, of course, there is Iris. When will she arrive at her nest in Missoula? As for me, I am glad that there is still a bit of a reprieve before all the Bald Eagle nests and Ospreys come on line.

As I sit here at my desk looking at an image of Aran with his wings outstretched on the perch at Glaslyn, there is a part of me that just can’t wait! If I skip the pages to get to March on the Glaslyn calendar, I see that Mrs G returned on the 26th of March with Aaron Z2 returning to Port Cresor on the 31st. That time with the two of them alone in the valley before Blue 014 and Aran came home from their winter migration was almost as good as a soap opera…no, actually it was better. Aran arrived on the 10th of April followed by Blue 014 the next day on the 11th. Mrs G’s first egg was laid on the 19th. Good thing those two got down to business right away or Aran might have been kicking those eggs out of the nest!!!!!!!!

On the opposite side of the bulletin board is the Loch Arkaig calendar with its notation that Louis and Dorcha returned on the 11th of April in 2022. So, the clock is ticking and it is normally Blue 33 and Maya that arrive first at Rutland – around the 23rd of March. Let’s see if that happens this year.

Also just quick note – the storms going through Louisiana took out some of the boxes on the cams at the Kisatchie National Forest. Cody will get them up and operating as quickly as he can. He says “The eagles are all OK”. Good news.


In the Mailbox:

Geemeff has written with a request. Did you watch the The Flight of the Osprey series? If you did, they would like your feedback!

“️We’d love to get your feedback on the Flight Of The Osprey expedition, the communications you received, and what you’d like in the future. The survey takes under five minutes and will allow us to continue to build on and strengthen our work. #TogetherWeFly Thank you!”

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf0RAQdZ1PO5s1y1Cf7OEt6BblJgr44LDusdllh6kflr_iG1w/viewform?pli=1

‘L’ sent me a listing of the wildlife rehabbers in the US and Canada. If you do not know who your nearest wildlife centre, check the list (I cannot vouch that it is 100% complete). Put their number and address in your cell phone. If you are out and see an injured bird, you can phone them and ask what to do. And if you really want to get serious about volunteering, you can check out their workshops. Every rehabber needs help. They do not earn salaries. Everything is by donation. That includes the driving of injured wildlife to their clinics. So check, see what you can do…and keep up the mantra of gently used and clean towels and sheets – they use lots of them. Do a collection in your neighbourhood in the spring when people are cleaning out! Petfood is another item, bleach, detergent…the list is long. Thanks, ‘L’.

https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/beginners/helping-birds/raptor-rehab-centers-u-s-canada/

Making News:

There could be a reason we are not seeing Thunder and Akecheta at the West End nest. Are they building a new nest elsewhere? I wonder if the fright of the eaglet falling out of the nest and having to be retrieved by Dr Sharpe has caused this change?

CROW is taking care of a very tiny bald eaglet that fell out of its nest tree.

Did you know that there is a Superb owl (Super Bowl for Owls) contest? The winner will get $5000 for their wildlife rehabilitation centre? I did not know today until the Audubon Centre for Prey wrote and asked me to vote for Sanford.

You can see the competition and vote here:

https://www.bonusfinder.com/about-us/blog/the-superb-owl-awards

Audubon also put out its special anniversary edition of Eaglewatch. There is some seriously interesting information inside the pages of this report.

Conservation without Borders has received many requests about the whereabouts of Blue 708 Glen (Tweed Valley Juvenile) – he seems to like Morocco!

The latest announcement from GROWLS. It does not sound like there will be any camera at all during the breeding season for 2023.

At the Nests:

It seems to be a good day at the nests without any undue problems of beaking or lack of prey. So nice! Would love a period of calm before the storm of the Osprey arrivals!

Sometimes when it all gets too much or you just need a break, head over to the Royal Albatross family. They are nothing short of sweet, adorable, and gorgeous. One chick every two years. This little one is very special.

GLY has returned home and has seen his chick for the first time. What lovely moments! L is now out foraging.

There will be a contest to give Sweet Pea its Maori name. Ranger Sharyn says it will take place after mid-February when the last egg has hatched.

Elain is giving us beautiful updates and a feeding of the Royal Cam chick. Thanks Holly Parsons for the posting!

Gabby and V3 were at the Northeast Florida Bald Eagle nest at 0730 doing some restorations. Gosh, they are a beautiful couple.

Gorgeous Gabby.

If you can see both of the right sides of their faces, you can easily tell them apart. Look at the shape of their heads and beak but, the real giveaway is the ‘V’ shaped nick below the cere of V3.

It has been raining in Webster, Texas. At the time Paul White published this video, the eaglets were having their second meal for the day. Ringo got a lot of the first bites, then Boots had some and then when Ringo was getting full, Boots starting getting all the fish. Both eaglets had nice crops and were full at the end of the feeding. It was very civilised.

Little CE9 was also fed well. CE9 will have a name on the 26th of January. Have you sent in a suggestion? If not, message Lori Covert on Instagram. And just a note, the Ospreys Mabel and Andy are named after Lori Covert’s maternal grandparents, not parents.

We all love Indigo and will be sad to see this beautiful juvenile falcon leave its parents territory. It is difficult to get so attached and have them leave and go on their way. It is, of course, why I like banding and sat paks. With banding, there is a chance to find out about the dispersal and survival rates. We can also find out about the history. Of course, with sat paks – which are much more expensive – we can track the long journeys of migrating birds as well as the ones who stay close to the nest.

It is always a treat at this time of year to have the juveniles still around, returning to the scrape so we can see them. Hello Indigo!

The Berry College Eaglet B16 is doing fantastic. It continues to be one of the cutest, chubbiest little babes. Adorable. Not sure what is up with B17 but if there is only one hatch, that is just fine!

Pa Berry was feeding his baby early this morning.

At the KNF-E3 nest, 02 has mastered the snatch and grab but, at the same time, he often gets bony pieces because he can’t or won’t wait. Several times Andria has had to save him. Here is an example that Rhonda A caught.

Book Review:

If you have been following my blog, you might remember that I have sung the praises of Joan E Strassman’s 2022 volume, Slow Birding. The Art and Science of Enjoying the Birds in Your Own Backyard. No fancy pictures just great writing and a challenge to all of us to learn about the birds that live near to us, to study them, to get to know them intimately.

One of the things that drew me to Strassman’s book was the fact that it was not a guide and it was not a book that would encourage you to run or drive or fly hither and yon to add to your Life List of Birds. Indeed, it is quite the opposite. Over the years I have received many letters from talented women who told me their lives were ruined by their fathers who stuffed them in the car before dawn on a weekend morning to go ‘birding’. The problem was…the male ran off leaving the wife to care for the children, often in the car, for hours. One told me that the best thing was ‘the donuts’. Another told me that she is just now, at the age of 65, learning to love birds.

All of us know about these life lists. E-bird often encourages it. But what we need isn’t a bird ticked off on a list but a real understanding of a bird’s behaviour, an intimate observation over time – days, weeks, years. Strassman challenges us to see the things around us and to understand them.

The book that I want to talk about today was written long ago by Florence A Merriam. Birds through an Opera Glass was published in 1896. 127 Years Ago. It has to be the first book, written by a woman, on ‘slow’ birding. It has been out of print for decades. The Leopold Classic Library prints copies on demand. Like Strassman’s, there are no colour images but, rather, black and white illustrations from Baird, Brewer and Ridgway’s History of North American Birds. Also like Strassman, Merriam is an excellent writer bringing her observations of the birds living around her to life with their strange behaviours and song.

This is a quote on how the nuthatch got its name:

“But his most interesting name is – nuthatch!  How does he come by it?  That seems riddle.  Some cold November day put on a pair of thick boots and go to visit the beeches.  There in their tops are the nuthatches, for they have deserted the tree trunks for a frolic.  They are beechnutting!  And that with as much zest as a party of school-children starting out with baskets and pails on a holiday.  Watch them now.  What clumsy work they make of it, trying to cling to the beechnut burr and get the nuts out the same time.  It’s a pity the chickadee can’t give them a few lessons!  They might better have kept to their tree trunks.  But they persist, and after tumbling off from several burrs, finally snatch out a nut and fly off with it as clammy as if they had been dancing about among the twigs all their days.  Away they go till they come to a maple or other rough-barked tree, when they stick the nut in between the ridges off the bark, hammer it down, and then, when it is so tightly wedged that the slippery shell cannot get away from them, by a few sharp blows they hatch the nut from the tree!  Through my glass I watched a number of them this fall, though some of them wedged their nuts far into cracks or holes in the body of the tree, instead of in the bark.  One of them pounded so hard he spread his tail and almost upset himself.  The fun was so great a downy woodpecker tried it, and of all the big school-boys!  The excitement seemed to turn his head and he attacked a beechnut burr as if he would close with it in mortal combat!”

Merriam writes about The Kingbird:  “The sobriety of his plain blackish coat and white vest are relieved by a coloured patch that may sometimes be espied under his crest, and also by a white tip to his tail, which when spread in flight, has the effect of a white crescent.”  

Birds Through an Opera Glass, 1896

The list of birds that Merriam covers is massive but she also gives hints to people who want to observe birds. 1) Avoid light or bright coloured clothing. 2) Walk slowly and noiselessly. 3) Avoid all quick, jerky motions. 4) Avoid Talking. 5) “If the bird was signing, but stops on your approach, stand still a moment and encourage him by answering his call. If he gets interested he will often let you creep within opera-glass distance. Some of the most charming snatches of friendly talk will come at such times.” 6) Make a practice of stopping often and standing perfectly still. “In that way you hear voices that would be lost if you were walking…” 7) Conceal yourself against a tree or pulling a branch in front of you. Merriam also advises that anyone wishing to observe birds should consider the time of the day and the weather. “They follow the sun!” “In spring and fall you will find them in the fields and orchards early in the morning, but when the sun has warmed the south side of the woods they go there; and in the afternoon they follow it across to the north side. During heavy winds and storms you are most likely to find birds well under cover of the woods, no matter at what time of day; and then, often on the side opposite that from which the wind comes.”

Merriam challenges us to begin with the simplest – the birds that you see and hear on a daily basis. For her it was the Robin. What would be your bird?

I highly recommend this book for anyone that wants to learn more about Robins, Crow Blackbirds, Ruffled Grouse, Nuthatches, Chickadees, and 65 other species. It is $19.66 CDN from Amazon. There is a link in the book for a free digital copy. It will be the best $20 you have spent. I promise. Just remember it is full of a great narrative and knowledge but not beautiful photographs!

Thank you so much for joining me today. It is always a pleasure to send you the news about our feathered friends, especially when it is all good. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: Geemeff, ‘L’ and Birdwatching Daily, CIEL and the IWS, Dana Campbell and the Cornell Hawk Cam Chatters plus CROW, Audubon Raptor Centre and Bonusfinder, Audubon Raptor Centre, Conservation Without Borders, Celia Aliengirl and Bald Eagles Nest Cam and News and GROWLS, NZ DOC, Elain and the NZ DOC, NEFL-AEF, Paul White and the Webster Texas Eagle Cam, Window to Wildlife, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, and Rhoda A and the KNF-E3 Bald Eagle Nest.

Both Red-tail Hawks found dead at Syracuse, another fish on E22’s head?…Tuesday in Bird World

24 January 2022

Good Morning to all of you,

Thank you so much for your letters and your comments. I really do enjoy hearing from you. I cannot always answer immediately but, I try not to be too long!

I am having to have a big laugh because I don’t want a big cry! No, no, nothing to do with birds. It is auto-correct! I have gone over this blog twice and keep finding the auto correct correcting things after I have moved on…it seems I have to check the words 3x before it stops. (I do like it to catch my spelling as I go so it is a bit of a double-edged sword for me). So I hope when you read this that the word ‘allopreening’ will be there and not ‘alley preening’!

It snowed a bit and the winds were blowing at times in the gardens. The European Starlings came early to feed off the suet cylinders. There were 43 of them! That is the highest count I have had all year.

The House Sparrows were absolutely everywhere. At the feeders. On the ground foraging and in the lilacs. Everywhere I looked there was a sparrow. Squint. They are in layers blending in to the lilacs and feeding with the Starlings at the suet.

The kittens loved watching them flit about. No Dove today. I hope it has found a wonderful and safe place for food!


Making News:

I am shaking my head in complete disbelief. Just the other day I posted the passing of Sue, the beautiful RTH and mate of Otto, at Syracuse University. She died of what appears to be head trauma on the 18th. The photo of Sue in the announcement was taken in the Oakwood Cemetery on that same day. Otto was found dead on the 19th in the cemetery. Did he also die on the 18th? or the 19th? I find this simply too much of a coincidence and it makes me highly suspicious that something caused these two beautiful birds to meet their demise that is not immediately evident. We will find out from the necroscopy, thank goodness. But that does not make this less a tragedy. If these deaths are not an accident or a natural cause, then the sadness is deepened. Condolences to everyone at Syracuse University and all those that loved Sue and Otto.

Did you know that the Ventana Wildlife Society provides lead free ammunition to hunters in specific counties in California to help halt the Condors (and other wildlife) from getting ill or dying from lead poisoning?

The VWS website gives all the information on what they offer and who is eligible. If you know of someone who hunts or is a rancher in these areas and they continue to use lead ammunition, please have them get in touch with the VWS immediately. The Condors will thank you!

The VWS produced a really short video about Cedric and his recovery from lead poisoning.

Do you want to know more about Condors? Do you love them as much as I do? Why not check out the monthly Zoom chats with the folks at the Ventana Wildlife Society? Go to ventananews.org and click on the link that you see below, to the left.

Skycalls, fluffy white chicks with cute pink bills and feet, allopreening adults, what isn’t there to love about an albatross?

Lady Hawk gives us some real cutie pie images of the Royal Cam chick in this video.

No Osprey egg yet at the Achieva Credit Union nest in St Petersburg, Florida but, we should be looking towards the end of January if our gal, Diane, sticks to her previous pattern of egg-laying.

They have mated on the pole, on the nest and probably around the neighbourhood…when do you think there will be an egg?

CE9 can really handle those big bites that Connie gives it. If Mum would only stop putting her beak under CE9’s, I think they would get a success rating of 100%. The wee one continues to benefit from numerous feedings per day and is growing stronger and stronger.

CE9 and Dudley.

Connie decides it is time for a feeding.

Clive arrives to check on his baby and the pantry and then is off doing territorial protection.

A bit of a stringy mess.

From an empty crop to a full one.

CE9 is getting very, very full.

Nap time. How many whole and partial fish can you find on this nest?

As the sun sets over the Captiva Bald Eagle nest of Connie, Clive, and CE9, the little one gets its last fish meal of the day.

In 2014, the Bald Eagles at Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ laid their first egg on the 17th of February. In 2022, the first egg was laid on the 17th of January – precisely a month earlier. This year that first egg was laid on 20 January so the eagles are sticking with this earlier nesting time. It only makes me wonder – as we wish for eggs from Gabby and Rose – if it might just be too hot in Florida for such a late hatch?

And just like clockwork, there is a second egg at Duke Farms!

It looks like Alex on the KNF-E3 nest trying to coax the two eaglets, 01 and 02 over to have some nice fresh fish.

Can you see the Mohawks?

Mum flies to the nest and both adults look over to the lake. Is there an intruder?

Are the parents testing the youngsters? Alex took off and Mum flew back to the branch. That whole fish is still there. Wonder if anyone will move to the table and try to eat it?

E01 is trying to balance itself to stand and walk. 02 looks on with interest.

Walking on a stick nest is not as easy as it looks.

The parent watches when its chick pecks at the fish. The babies are growing up with those big heavy wings and feathers coming in.

Would you like some fish?

Confidence is back in 02. The meal went well.

Do you like the Pittsburgh-Hayes Eagle nest? Mum and Dad were there today – and mating ——in the snow!

There are winter storm warnings for various parts of the US including Oklahoma, my old home State, and a system tracking up through Iowa, Ohio, and into New York. I went to check on Big Red’s nest to see if she was getting the snow that was hitting Pittsburg and the camera was down. Then the computer did a funny thing and there was Superbeaks. I was not expecting this image. It is smaller here but filled up my entire screen almost – and I held my breath. Do not, listen you two, look so far down that you go flipsy.

What is of such interest below? is it a parent on a lower branch?

There are not a lot of ‘dandelions’ left on these two as those almost black juvenile feathers continue to grow longer and longer.

Oh, it is windy on the nest of Jackie and Shadow at Big Bear. The storm system is east of the Colorado River and is not expected to hit them. Yippeeee. They get a break. Shadow brought in prey and is incubating while Jackie has a break.

The wind is gusty. You can see it blowing the feathers on the back of Shadow’s head above and then it is calm below.

Do you know why raptors roll their eggs? FOBBV reminds us: “Eggs are rolled regularly to prevent the embryo & egg membranes from sticking to the shell & to distribute albumen & heat evenly.”

Thank you, Sharon Pollock. I wish my eyes were a little better but, what a beautiful sight that was of Jackie and Shadow soaring together around and over the nest tree. Just amazing.

Mabel and Angus are sure a handsome couple at the Captiva Osprey nest.

What a difference! The warm sunshine of Florida to the hoar frost in Iowa at the Decorah Eagle nest. It sure is beautiful.

Fans of the Redding Eagles…there was an adult on the nest today!

The cuteness of Ron and Rose caught by HeidiMc.

It is not clear what is happening with the second egg at Berry College. Are those marks or is that chick trying to get out of that shell?

This is little Boots at Webster, Texas raising its head for a bite of fish. It ‘appears’ from the posts today that things are going well and Ringo is behaving her/his self.

Worry spread through the SWFlorida Eagle fans as blood appeared on the top of E22’s head – it was another fish landing there!

Someone will be watching to see if this is just blood from the fish or a possible scratch caused by the fish on the nape of 22.

22 ate well and there was little if any beaking that I could see today.

Zoe is 129 days old. Mum delivered a single fish to her girl yesterday and, she might well have had a fish off camera. Today Zoe left the nest and it appears she might have returned wet from an excursion or she might have tried fishing off the barge (the camera was stuck on zoom). It is really hard to tell. What we do know is that Zoe is still home. From my perspective she looks ‘well fed’ and healthy.

One last tidbit about the falcons…but not Annie and the New Guy or Indigo but Sequoia and her mate at the San Jose City Hall scrape. Seems you have to be careful where you stash away your prey in San Jose, too.

Who is Sequoia’s mate? HeidiMc found out! Shasta is a very interesting falcon.

What the poster below doesn’t say is when you set out and kill any insect or animal, it has a severe impact on the food chain. Think mice and rats. Secondary poisoning in domestic pets and raptors is real. We need those insects, we need the pigeons (yes people put poison on their roofs to kill the pigeons – those pigeons could kill our beautiful peregrine falcons), etc. So take care and talk about this with your friends and loved ones.

Thank you so very much for being with us today. Tomorrow I will have a review of Florence A Merriam’s Birds Through An Opera Glass. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their announcements, posts, videos, tweets, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: HeidiMc, Red-tailed Hawk Tails, Ventana Wildlife Society, Lady Hawk and NZ DOC, Achieva Credit Union, Window to Wildlife, Duke Farms, KNF-E3, Pix Cams, Superbeaks, FOBBV, Sharon Pollock and FOBBV, Raptor Research Project and Explore.org, Redding Eagles, HeidiMc and the WRDC, Duke Farms, Bel-A-Donna and Berry College, SWFlorida Eagles and D Pritchett, Port Lincoln Ospreys, and Pollinator Friendly Yards.

If you would like to join our wonderful birding community and receive a copy of my blog in your inbox daily, please feel free to subscribe. I desperately try not to load up your inbox and there is generally only one blog per day unless something really crazy happens and I think you will want to know asap. You can unsubscribe at any time!

Captiva adults named Angus and Mabel…Monday in Bird World

23 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone!

For those celebrating the Chinese New Year or Tet, I hope that you had a wonderful time with friends and/or family and that your upcoming year will be all you wish it to be.

I am always on about the weather but, this week will be reasonable on the Canadian Prairies. The meteorologists are forecasting that we will be thrown into the -25 degree C range beginning in a week and that those extreme temperatures will last for at least a week. I am not looking forward to this because it causes me to worry about the few birds that visit the garden that really should have gone South sooner or the tundra swan north of me. Without our technologically advanced clothing, humans actually cannot endure those blustery temperatures like the birds. Still, I worry about them when I see their little legs. So there will be lots of high protein, high-energy suet cylinders all around the lilacs for everyone in a week.

Today there were the sparrows and dear Dyson who has managed to consume almost an entire hard seed cylinder in 36 hours. Can you see her? She blends in well. She also scares all the other little songbirds away when she runs through the lilac bushes making sure her summer children do not bother her while she is eating.

The European Starlings arrive around 12:30. They are as good as some of the European and Japanese trains that are on the ‘minute’. The Starlings only eat (as far as I can see) this cornmeal-peanut butter mixture formed into cylinders. It is high energy and helps keep them fit and warm.

The lighting was not good and I had the camera set to automatic but, this image of the Dove came out not so bad. The kittens really love seeing ‘their’ friend.

Making News:

We are going to start with the horrible reality of Avian Flu because other than the news items, the state of Bird World is really pretty good late on Sunday evening, the 22nd of January, the Year of the Water Rabbit.

Avian Flu has been found in bears! While everyone really hoped that this killer would ‘go away’, it isn’t. Every week new outbreaks are documented in birds that require euthanasia. It is sad and what scares me most is that it could become much worse in the spring.

We have read about the killings of raptors in the UK. We know that storks are shot when they migrate over certain countries. We also know that beautiful eagles and hawks are shot in the US and elsewhere. I cannot even imagine, for a second, aiming a gun at a bird to try and injure or kill it. Not even if I were starving. Today, APCH has a new patient – a Red Tail Hawk that was shot! This makes me angry.

Another victim of lead poisoning. Rainy has been receiving medical attention since she was admitted to the Winged Freedom Raptor Hospital. What I want you to notice is how tiny that piece of lead is that was causing her to be deathly ill. Now imagine a hunter leaving the innards of a deer full of lead shot and the carrion eaters consuming that lead so that they have a meal and can survive another day with food.

Here is the update. So happy for the good news.

Nest News:

The new pair of Ospreys at Lori Covert’s Captiva Osprey platform have been named Mabel and Angus after Lori Covert’s maternal grandparents.

Love is in the air at The Campanile on the University of California-Berkeley campus. Annie and the ‘new guy’. Thanks Sassa Bird for the re-post and to moon-rabbit-rising for those amazing images.

SK Hideaways caught The New Guy and his amazing scraping..a world record?

Oh, it is a windy day for Jackie at the Big Bear Valley nest. You can hear icy-snow pelting the camera lens. Jackie takes it all in stride.

Jackie is so peaceful. On Sunday, Shadow delivered a fish and tried to incubate. Jackie told him ‘no’. I guess he will have to resort to the ‘stick persuasion method’ tomorrow. :))

It has been a busy Sunday at the Achieva Credit Union nest. Jack and Diane are mating, making nestorations, and Jack continues to provide fish gifts for Diane during the day. Well done, Jack! I might even think there was a new invigorated ‘you’ this year! You are being very attentive. Keep it up!

Indigo is still chasing his parents at Orange! He is so adorable…who would ever mind all that screaming? Elain’s highlights from the 22nd.

CE9 is still being fed well.

Lots of crops and a moment, over by the fish, when it seemed that CE9 would be self-feeding well before expected. So how long do you think it will take before CE9 is nibbling these fish?

Sweet little CE9. It will have a name next week. Did you vote? Go to the Window for Wildlife FB or Lori Covert Instagram and send them your name. Needs to be gender-neutral.

Oh, it is soaking at the Captiva Eagle Nest of Connie and Clive Monday morning. That did not stop Connie feeding little CE9. Oh, this baby is a sweetie. Moving around when it hears Mum so it can have some more of that fish Clive has stacked on the nest.

The wee babe is growing. Look at it compared to the egg today. And CE9 is able to handle those big bites of Mum! Such a relief that things are going well here.

The kids at Superbeaks just seem to be getting bigger by the day. That nest is going to be crazy when they both start to vigorously flap those wings. What a wonderful nest this has been to watch — it was like watching the Albatross. We could not see any of the early behaviour and we were not stressed.

You can get a really good look at the thermal down underneath the feathers in the image below.

Ron brought Rita a really nice fish to the WRDC nest in Miami-Dade.

HeidiMc’s latest video of Ron and Rose. Such characters!

B16, Missy and Pa Berry’s nestling, has been enjoying lots of rabbit.

Missy wanted to feed the wee babe the minute it hatched. She had to wait til morning and she filled it with rabbit…there must be lots of rabbits around Berry College in Georgia.

B16 is a cute little butterball of a baby. Pa Berry has several rabbits and a squirrel on the nest. Good thing as the snow is starting to come down on Missy and B16.

For those who have not been able to check on the Port Lincoln Osprey barge, Zoe is still on the barge. She flew in this morning and the minute she put a talon on the nest she started screaming for fish. That’s our Zoe!

Zoe has her landing gear down as she approaches the barge.

Zoe got caught in some cross winds. Rudder full open. Raised the wings to correct and slow.

For a moment I thought she had something in her talon. That would have been so special.

Landing at 09:18:10. Zoe immediately starts screaming for fish!

Zoe is 127 days old. Yesterday Mum and Dad each brought a fish to their big girl. On the 17th of January Zoe brought a fish to the nest but, she did not catch it herself. It was a delivery off the barge.

Nancy and her new mate at the MN-DNR nest have been working on the railings at the nest early Sunday morning. It is quiet now. Snow is starting to fall.

It is very difficult to see but it would appear that the redness on Boots’ neck and back from Ringo plucking, has dissipated. In the video clips that were posted by Paul White on Sunday, there appeared to be civil behaviour. There is a huge difference in the size of the eaglets. Let us hope that all of the beaking is over.

The nest in Webster, Texas home to Ringo and Boots.

Ringo.

Little Boots. See how the area that had been plucked appears to not be red. White fluffy down on the head. A real change and a nice one. The nest has been beak free for a couple of days.

Everything seems fine at the Webster TX nest Monday morning. Little Boots is having what appears to be a good breakfast.

All is well with Gabby and V3. You can hear the wind blowing hard on the nest tree in The Hamlet Sunday evening. The nest is ready and in good shape with a nice soft egg cup – if we have eggs this year from this new couple.

It is a beautiful nest. I know that we are all hoping to see little eaglets. Fingers crossed.

Dr Peter Sharpe is one of our heroes. The care and attention he gives to the Channel Islands eagles is unparalleled. He also helps other groups in the area including Cal Falcons. Just look at this landscape and imagine taking a boat and climbing a cliff to save an eaglet that has gotten out of the nest and that is clinging for life literally to the rock.

Akecheta was looking out from the rocks on Sunday at 17:57 and Thunder flew across the frame below.

Iowa has snow. The camera at Decorah North caught a beautiful deer sleeping in the snow today.

I wonder if the eagle was watching the deer below the tree.

At the southern end of New Zealand is the Taiaroa Head near Dunedin. That is where the Royal Albatross colony lays their eggs. The Royal Cam chick hatched a few days ago. It is already growing – doubling its weight, etc. Incredible. The NZ DOC rangers do wellness checks which include a quick examination and a weigh in to make certain that every chick is healthy and progressing well. Here are some images from the Royal Cam nest for today.

Flystrike (and the larvae that the flies leave) is a real threat to the health and life of the wee albatross chicks. Notice that big fly trying to get under the adult! Flystrike is a threat to the nestlings for a fortnight (2 weeks) after the chick is returned to its parent and placed in the nest. You will continue to see checking for fly strike and spraying around the nest and in it until then.

This is L, the Mum, brooding the chick.

The rangers are so very gentle when they remove the chick from the nest.

L stimulating the beak of her chick to feed. So sweet.

Harriet gave E21 and 22 their final feeding of the day around 18:20. By 18:30 both eaglets had very large crops. That is the little one, E22, closest to Mum’s beak.

It is a soaking Monday morning. Harriet kept the babies dry and then needed to feed the chirping wiggle worms.

It turned out to be a nice day rather than a wet one at the Kisatchie National Forest nests Monday. That is KNF-E3 02 sitting up with its clown feet. Feeding of Coot appears to have gone well.

Baby of Anna and Louis was enjoying a non-rainy day feed as well.

Thank you so much for being with me this morning. Take care everyone! See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: The New York Times, A Place Called Hope, Winged Freedom Raptor Hospital, Window to Wildlife, Sassa Bird and Cal Falcons plus moon_rabbit_rising, SK Hideaways and Cal Falcons, FOBBV, Achieva Credit Union, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, Superbeaks, WRDC, Heidi MC and WRDC, Berry College, Port Lincoln Ospreys, MN-DNR, Paul White and Webster Eagle Watchers FB, NEFL-AEF, IWS and Explore.org, Raptor Resource Project and Explore.org, NZ DOC, SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, KNF-E3, and KNF-E1.

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