Another loss in Osprey Land…and other news in Bird World

7 July 2022

Good Morning Everyone. I hope that your day is bright with sunshine. A decade or kore ago, the summer temperatures in Winnipeg averaged 17-19 degrees C. Then for 4 or 5 years – perhaps a little more – they crept up to the high 20s with some days being 38 degrees. Today it is 19 C. A fantastic day for a walk and a check on the goslings later.

Yesterday I reported on one of the fledglings at the West End nest being in a dust up with another. I could not see any bands but made the assumption that it was one of the other siblings – forgetting that the 2-3 year old juveniles are returning to the Channel Islands. Lady Hawk cleared that up with a video noting it was an intruder that attacked Sky. A shout out to ‘B’ for letting me know!

Here is Lady Hawk’s video of that event:

I wondered how long it would be before more names were added to ‘the list’. That news arrived late last evening when ‘A’ wrote to me about the sadness at the Finnish Osprey nest of Miina and Marko. The feathers were found under the nest and it is believed that the nest was attacked, as others have been, by a henhawk. So sad. This nest site with its close proximity to the forest seems to be an unlucky one. Thank you, ‘A’ for letting me know.

Here is the information from Looduskalender:

"The nest equipped with a webcam in the Võrumaa osprey (Kalakotkas 1), where female Miina and male Marko nested with two eaglets, was soon taken down due to damage caused by lightning.

Today the nest was empty, the nest tree was all broken, the osprey, the young bird, was killed. The burglary could have happened a few days ago."

Happily, the osplets on the nest in Finland are healthy and safe – so far no attacks that I am aware. This is a natural Osprey nest – not a human made platform – 160 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is in the area known as Lapland and they have sunshine almost 24/7 this time of year.

Here is the link to this nest if you do not know it:

The osplets at nest #4 are simply gorgeous and it will not be long until they are ready to fledge. Oh, let us hope that the hawks do not come around!

If you would like to watch all of the Osprey nests in Finland at one time, here is that link: saaksilive.fi/live/kaikkikamerat

Dory is busy shading the three osplets at the Boathouse Osprey nest on Hog Island today. Gosh, isn’t she just a great first time Mum?!

We will never know if the hour long fireworks did any damage to the Bald Eagles hearing at the National Arboretum. Takoda, however, continues to be fed by Mr President on the nest – and this is a good thing because we get to see this gorgeous fledgling. Takoda was eating breakfast at 0628.

All around the world people continue to celebrate the little Red-tail Hawk, Malala, that survived from being the Bald Eagle’s dinner on Gabriola Island. It was always difficult to see Malala clearly on the streaming cam. Sharon Palmer-Hunt posted two photographs of Malala on the GROWLS FB page and, in case you didn’t see it, here she is:

Adorable. Like the fledgling Blue Jays, the Red-tail hawks have light blue or light blue-gray-green eyes. As they age, the eyes will turn a deep espresso brown.

Check out the tail below. How many dark bands does Malala have? Laura Culley suggests that they need at least 5 but better 6 to fledge. Malala has been flying for a little over a week (?) and she now has 8 or 9.

Our other favourite Red-tail hawk fledglings were caught hunting and playing around the Cornell Campus last evening by Suzanne Arnold Horning. Oh, they are adorable. She got all three! Thank you, ‘S’. All of us appreciate your efforts chasing these quick hawks around the campus so we can see them.

As the North American birds fledge, we will be moving our attention to Australia. One of the most adorable Peregrine Falcon couples is Xavier and Diamond at the scrape on the grounds of Charles Sturt University in Orange. They are not a young couple – considered middle age at 9 years old.

Xavier gets prey and stashes it in the corner of the scrape for Diamond. Diamond is very particular. She does not like European Starling!!!!!! It looks a nice pigeon for lunch today.

If you do not know this couple, here is the link to their camera. We will be expecting eggs in late August/early September.

Beautiful Diamond.

If you do not know this couple, here is the link to their streaming cam:

There is wonderful news coming from Estonia. We knew from the photograph that the trail camera took that Kaia had found the fish basket Urmas has provided this family so that it can feed the foster chick, Bonus. Now Urmas has posted a photograph showing Karl II finding the fish basket! The adults will require so much more food as the storklets grow bigger and bigger.

The wonderful experiment to save as many of Jan and Janika’s Black Stork fish appears to be working with the dedication of Urmas and his team. I want to find the donation button and post it again as the cost of the fish for the two – Karl II and Eedie families – is high. If you wanted to help and haven’t yet, there is still plenty of time.

I often have disagreements over intervention with some of my raptor associates. In the case of the Black Storks, they are extremely rare. It is possible that all of the fledglings from last year in Latvia and Estonia did not survive. (We await word on Udu). It is not, however, just the Black Storks. So many of the first year birds are lost in their first year. To put accurate data on the % is very difficult as the following academic article explains. Depending on the species it can be as much as 60% in the first year.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/share/RJQ8YWEPSPMKTMERURGU?target=10.1111/ibi.12355

That is why the intervention that we are seeing when adults die or birds in the nest get injured or knocked off is so important.

I was particularly moved by a statement ‘A’ made: “Now when I see an adult bird of any species, I am amazed that it made it to adulthood safely.”

‘H’ reports that there are now two chicks fledged from the Osprey nest in Carthage, Tennessee. Congratulations!

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. Have a wonderful day – or evening – wherever you are. Take care of yourselves. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams, personal images, and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, Finnish Osprey Foundation, NADC-AEF, GROWLS, Charles Sturt University Falcon Cam, Looduskalender, Suzanne Arnold Horning, and Explore.org and Audubon.

4 Comments

  1. Linda Kontol says:

    Thanks Mary Ann for the updates.
    So sorry to hear of the Osprey nest in Finland. The Goshawks are extremely bad for killing other birds chicks. As I have never heard of other birds bothering the goshawks chicks though.
    Crows will also invade other birds nests.
    Glad all the others are doing well. Prayers all of them will be ok and fledge.
    See you soon. So glad the weather is good there today
    And you can enjoy the walk.
    Take care!
    Linda

    1. It is the same nest that had trouble before…by that forest. Yes, I saw Ravens peck Osplets to death but only crows eating the eggs. It is such a hard time for the bird parents to raise any babies to fledge. so sad.

      1. Linda Kontol says:

        Yes it is so sad Mary Ann. The parents try so hard. Yes maybe ravens instead of crows.
        Goshawks are beautiful birds but they don’t care whose nest they take. Last season the one goshawk killed the chicks and left them for no reason. They little chicks were bigger size and very pretty and sweet. I don’t understand it. The osplets were not even taken for food.
        Hopefully it will not happen anymore to other nests. 🙏
        Take care!
        Linda

      2. I have been trying to figure out what is a hen hawk in Finland. I think that they are meaning a goshawk but here it refers to a Red-tail hawk or a Red-shouldered hawk. It is the same nest where the chicks were killed last year. Normally the goshawk would take them back to their nest for their chicks. That is very strange that they left them -. Birds do not normally kill for fun and eat every morsel. I wonder what happened last year?? Yes, we hope for no more little ones about to fledge dying. Life is hard enough once those wings fly away from home.

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