Late Monday news in Bird World

8 August 2022

The condolences continue to pour into Poole Harbour for the loss of 5H2 due to the goshawk attack and to Loch Garten’s 1C1 to unknown causes. It is worse when the osplets are older and flying. The number of Osprey in the UK is very small compared to North America and the loss of these two chicks on significant nests took its toll today. Last year the osplets died due to weather issues when they were so little. This year we lost a wee one at Llyn Brenig, the third hatch at Loch Arkaig when its foot caught and it could not get under Mum during the worst weather. Siblicide at Loch of the Lowes. It is hard either way but raising chicks to fledge and then losing them is just tragic.

I have had many letters asking if Loch Garten is doing a post-mortem. Yes, they are! The cameras will be turned off during the removal of the chick and then turned back on. We have seen three ‘mysterious’ deaths this year on streaming cams of Ospreys -Big at Captiva, Molate at SF Bay, and now 1C1 at Loch Garten. I included Big because there was no confirmation of why she died. Molate was visibly unwell for a few days, just like 1C1. Is it the same? (It is unclear to me as to whether GG Audubon ever removed Molate’s body from the grid as fledglings Brooks and the Visitor continue to come to the nest. Speculation is a lung infection. I do recall Molate also had trouble breathing. Curious.

Elsewhere in Bird World, life seems reasonably stable but everything can change in a few seconds – without any warning – as was the case of H52.

The great experiment by Urmas and Dr Madis to save the Black storklets of Jan and Janika would have been significant if not for the loss of all the chicks on Eedi’s nest due to predation (possibly another Goshawk attack). There is one survivor, Bonus. Bonus is doing tremendously well. He is 78 days old today. Karl II and Kaia have found the filled fish baskets and the chicks are so full that when Karl II comes in with a delivery the four of them cannot eat all the fish. Yes, it is true!

Fledging could come at any time. Bonus is overdue but because of his delayed development due to stress and lack of food, he will fly once he is ready, not by a calendar. Kaia often leaves by 11 August so we are watching to see what will happen this year.

It is mostly quiet. Many of us are watching the females in the UK to spot on leaves when. Maya is still at Manton Bay in Rutland.

I could not get a good look at her face but this is that amazing female who raised three big girls with Blue 33 this year! She is the mother of Telyn at Dyfi.

1H3 has enjoyed a nice fish delivery today.

1H1 is screaming to goodness for Mum or Dad to get a fish on the nest for her!!!!!!!!! What a beauty.

All of the fledglings could catch their own fish. The parents do not have to teach them – 60 million years is hardwired into their DNA. The fledglings just do not know that they can do it! During migration they will have to begin to fiend for themselves.

These females are such characters. Blue 33 could hear his girl across the lake! “I want a fish now!” Blue 33 is one of my great loves as far as ospreys go. He is 11 years old this year and is ending his 9th breeding season. He has raised two sets of four osplets to fledge with Maya…They are a super couple in a realm of their own.

Remember that flapping fish that we thought had killed at least one of the little ones – they survived. All three nice big girls!

It is hot at the Dyfi nest in Wales of Idris and Telyn. Tomorrow it will be 30 C. Telyn is still here. She has been chasing off an intruder which appears to be annoying her to no end. I do not blame her. Now is not the time for an injury. Telyn will leave Wales and fly to The Gambia. According to Chris Woods who travels to The Gambia in the winter, he knows precisely where her favourite perch is. Brilliant. It is always reassuring to know she has arrived safely.

Just look at all the cameras.

Relaxing down by the Dyfi River.

Emyr Evans has posted a very interesting blog testing different hypotheses about the unringed visitor to the Dyfi Nest. It has some information about fledging ages and the start of migration. Thanks EE – we love the Dyfi Data!

https://www.dyfiospreyproject.com/blog/emyr-mwt/extremely-rare-visitor-unringed-fledgling

I see no word that Blue NC0 has left the Loch of the Lowes either. Both chicks have been flying for at least 3 weeks and they are doing some fancy landings and take offs from the nest. I was able to catch them on the nest today – one with a fish and the other screaming to Laddie LM12 (Dad) to bring another pronto! These males sure get a work out at the end of the season. No wonder their legs are so strong and muscular.

These two look to be in brilliant shape!

Mrs G is still here. She is on the perch to the left while Aran is on the one at the right.

Aran and Mrs G looking out on their territory from the Glaslyn nest. Aran is in the back, Mrs G, the oldest osprey in the UK, is in the front.

Fledgling eating a fish on the Glaslyn nest while Mrs G is at the nest.

I cannot read the Darvic rings but this looks like a different fledgling enjoying a meal earlier in the day.

I was also able to catch Seren and one of the chicks on the Llyn Clywedog nest in Wales. It is so rare to see chicks on the nest that I feel fortunate checking all of the nests and finding at least one today.

Dorcha and the two fledgling chicks were on Loch Arkaig! I did not see Louis but he is about bringing in fish.

This one desperately wants a fish!

They do not know that they are getting ready for the most challenging two years of their lives. If they live to get to the South of England or parts thereabouts, they will feed up. There are scores of birds that will be at Poole Harbour making their way to their winter homes. How many of them will survive? When we hear averages, it must be the entire raptor family, not just specific species. We know that the UK birds will either land on the Iberian Peninsula and winter or they will continue to Africa and winter in The Gambia and Senegal. I hope to get some figures for Ospreys only. It will be easy to get UK figures of 2 year survival – or thereabouts – as from the Dyfi note – all known birds have Darvic Rings except for a few nests in Scotland and maybe one hiding in Montgomeryshire in Wales. The figure is going to be low and it could provide us with more insights. Less than 1 in 3 I suspect.

Remember – send me the stories you remember about migration. I am particularly interested in the huge challenges these birds face. Get it to me by Thursday night. Thanks!

I peeked in at the Osoyoos and Fortis Exshaw nest briefly throughout the day. The heat dome is definitely hitting BC again but Soo and Olsen seem to be weathering it fine. I have also checked on Titi who has been hovering but has not fledged. Titi is in a very dangerous position if he cannot fly – he is literally the sitting osprey for that Goshawk that continues to fly around the nest! I wonder why he is not moving? We saw Nuppu try to beak her youngest to fly. Titi has no mother, only a sibling and Dad and he needs to work those wings and get out of there.

The latest updates on Victor came on 3 August. If you missed it, here it is. There has been nothing since. We must assume that Victor is continuing to progress. Treatments for heavy lead toxicity take a long time.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or posts where I took my screen captures: Finnish Osprey Foundation, The Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch Arkaig and the Woodland Trust, CarnyXWild, LRWT, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Wildlife Trust.

Life and Death in Bird World…

18 July 2022

We are going to start off with the good news…a hatch! Sydney’s Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre is giving the official hatch time of WBSE 29 at 1426. There is also a pip in WBSE30’s egg.

Beautiful Lady. By the time we wake up tomorrow morning there should be two healthy White-bellied Sea Eaglets in this nest getting ready to bop and bob.

I thought I might make it through Sunday evening without finding out about another Osprey death. Not so. A much loved male Osprey of a long time mated pair in Bitterroot Valley, Montana was shot with a soft bullet and died. Local animal right’s activists have issued a reward for the identity of the shooter.

Shootings of protected raptors are on the rise in the area. There were 7 last year and already there are 5 this year in this single area of Montana. Reports from wildlife rehab clinics often cite either shootings or – heavy lead toxins due to the eating of prey with bullet fragments – as the major reason for eagles to be in care or dying.

It is, of course, illegal to shoot a protected species but, it doesn’t seem to matter. It has happened in my City, all over the US, in various countries in the EU such as France and Malta. And, of course, there are the ongoing issues in the UK on the private estates where grouse hunting is permitted.

https://mtstandard.com/news/state-and-regional/bitterroot-osprey-shooting-leaves-activists-looking-for-answers/article_fe7ff6c8-f90b-535f-98b6-9a3826e123ee.html?fbclid=IwAR3qVHQb8gMmqRYhFw6CQZX24PHNfYuaFMh57p_EOndiZBTT7NLxDI5dwno


There is good news coming out of the Osoyoos nest. One look at the image reveals the remains of a large fish still on the nest. ‘A-M’ mentioned on the chat that both chicks had eaten well today and Little Bob even had a really full crop. Apparently both parents brought in 2 big fish. It is wonderful to see Mum with a big crop, too. Oh, we could not ask for anything better coming out of the heat in the area. Fantastic.

With all the sadness, the fact that this nest got 2 great big fish and everyone is full and there is still fish is something to celebrate. I wanted fish to fall from the sky but coming in from the lake is just as good.

To also put a smile on your face, Lilibet at the Fraser Point nest of Andor and Mama Cruz had something to say to the fox cub that keeps getting on her nest! And she was very vocal about it.

There is other good news. The youngest osplet of the trio at Llyn Clywedog fledged at 10:22 on Sunday the 17th. Congratulations Dylan and Seren for another successful year and to all those at Llyn Clywedog in Wales.

Seren on one perch and two of the fledglings on the other perch.

The two osplets on the Llyn Brenig nest in Wales have not fledged. They certainly have grown since I last checked on them! Mom looks happy and I bet that fish Dad brought in really tasted good.

Dorcha looking over her two osplets as the sun was setting on Loch Arkaig.

and dawn over Loch Arkaig. I has been impossible to tell how Dorcha is doing. Hopefully she will go for a good swim and get the blood off from her injury – continuing good thoughts for her to heal quickly.

The area is so beautiful.

The Glaslyn Valley nest of Aran and Mrs G is so very different than Loch Arkaig and Loch of the Lowes. The cows and the sheep make the entire scene look like it could be a 17th century painting.

At the Loch of the Lowes, one of the fledglings slept ‘adult style’ on the nest perch all night. There is another (or two?) osprey/s on the dead tree at centre left. Where is everyone else? Laddie? Blue NC0?

Later. Waiting for a delivery!

Dad delivers fish to the Janakkdan Osprey nest on a regular basis. Here is the last delivery for the 17th at 19:28. The osplets will take turns self-feeding.

I have not seen the female on the nest for some hours – from 1900 to 0700. The chicks have not fledged. Some on the chat questioned if she has begun her migration. No, it is too early. Let us hope that she is well.

It is possible there is a perch and Mum is there. She was on the nest at noon today. Both chicks appear to be capable of eating on their own. One better than the other but it has had more practice.

‘H’ reports that it is Smooth Dogfish Shark for breakfast at the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest! Dad brought in two in quick succession. Everyone was hungry – one fledgling trying to self-feed and the other being fed by Mum who eventually feeds both.

While the ospreys in Delaware were enjoying their Smooth Dogfish Sharks, Karl II was delivering large fish to the Karula National Forest Black storkling nest – that includes Bonus, the adopted storklet of Jan and Janikka. I am so happy that the four are doing so well and so grateful to Urmas for his fish basket! Thank you, Urmas.

The camera was down at Glacier Gardens for part of the 17th. NitBot reports that there were four fish deliveries with Peace getting 1 fish and Love seeming to get the other 3. It is so hard to see the eaglets – is it condensation on the camera? and the cars racing up and down that road are making me nervous. But…Liberty and Freedom know best!

There is no word yet on what caused the 9 day old osplet of Tom and Audrey at the Chesapeake Conservancy to suddenly die. Will keep you posted on any news. Its death was entirely unexpected. There was lots of fish and it was eating well.

Everything seems to be fine for Dory and Skiff and their three osplets on Hog Island in Maine.

Here is a short video of Dory feeding the three just a short while ago.

Like everywhere else, it has been hot and stormy on the Canadian Prairies. If you are in an area of high heat and have shallow bowls (no deeper than 2 or 3 inches), put some water in them if you do not have a bird bath. All manner of raptor are coming to cool down including the local crows and owls – even the rabbits have been in to drink water and get in the shade of the lilacs and ‘the bush tunnels’. I will try to get a photo if I can but Mr Crow was on top of the sunroom/greenhouse this morning telling me that he wanted breakfast!

An osprey expert in the UK told me that never rule out dehydration in the death of Ospreys. He was talking about Molate. But, remember that all of the birds can suffer in the heat without water!

The image below is (I believe) Hedwig’s baby. It is really cropped and blown up – the rabbit is tiny. Those are dandelion leaves and they are not long. He thought he was hiding behind some of the builder’s garbage! But we saw you, cutie pie. Caught in the act. You can eat all of the dandelion leaves you want!

This is Hedwig the Elder over eating the seeds that the birds spill everywhere! What they are really enjoying are the tender shoots.

Bye Hedwig!

Hedwig and Little Hedwig took off together to go to their burrow which is across the back lane underneath a garage.

It has been a week since Victor was rescued. I have not seen an update but it is early in California. Looking forward to some news. Things are rather quiet in Bird World — and goodness, gosh, golly…quiet is welcome. There will be more fledges in the UK and another baby Sea Eagle tomorrow. Something to look forward to….

Thank you for being with me today. Take care Everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Sydney Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Osoyoos Ospreys, Explore.org and IWS, CarnyXwild, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Postcode Lottery, and the Wildlife Trust, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch of the Lowes, Finnish Osprey Foundation, Mispillion Harbour Ospreys and the DDNR, Eagle Club of Estonia, Glacier Gardens, Chesapeake Conservancy, and Explore.org and Audubon.

Victor is Rescued …and brief other news in Bird World

11 July 2022

Wow.

As we wait for Dr Sharpe to reach Santa Cruz and the Fraser Point nest of Andor and Mrs Cruz, I want to also celebrate the on-going success of the Black Stork rescue and adoption in Estonia. This is a video of Kaia finding the fish basket that Urmas left for her and Karl II to help with the food needed for four storklets when he placed Bonus on their nest. Bonus is one of two surviving storklets from Jan and Janika’s nest. The other storklet, Extra, is in the nest of Eedi who also has a fish basket.

It is thrilling to see this project working. With the rising temperatures, warming waters, fish dying, and streams drying up, we should begin to think of how we can provide fish for all the birds that require them to survive. This includes diverting water, raising and stocking streams, etc. I am certain you can think of many more ways but also big tanks – like those used to raise fish for people – could be provided for the birds. Yes, this is a big endeavour but, it is not too big that it cannot be funded with monies spent on human entertainment, like fireworks. One City. 19 million dollars. That buys lots of fish! Add up every city and town. (I will definitely not be invited to any Canada Day celebrations next year, for sure!)

We already know that the tanks for raising fish are enjoyed by the Ospreys because our fish hawks take the fish and make the fish farmers very angry! We also know approximately how many fish are needed by an Osprey family during breeding season. I believe this data would also be available for the rare Black Storks in Latvia and Estonia.

Intervention as a necessity at its best.

At 15:14 the first Welsh osplet of the 2022 breeding season fledged! It was 554 from the Llyn Clywedog nest of Dylan and Seren. Congratulations everyone.

Seren watches.

554 made a good controlled return. All is well. Congratulations everyone!

Mama Thunder got fed up with the intruder that has been harassing the kids and fighting with her and them. She gave that intruder the boot today!

Lillibet has come to keep Victor company while nearly 500 people wait and watch for the rescue team. Victor has been in the brush for 24 hours now – as Dr Sharpe makes his way by car and boat to save him. There seems to be a very special bond between this pair similar to that I saw in E17 and 18 at the Southwest Florida Eagle nest.

Everyone is urging Victor to hold only just a little longer.

Lillibet stayed with Victor until he left. Rescue time was 13:30:37. Dr Sharpe and his assistant wasted no time but they did show everyone that Victor was alive. He will now go to the Ojai Raptor Centre in Ojai, California. Thinking of donations – think about them as well.

Victor is protesting. That is good.

And he is off!

Wow. Terribly sad to see the two siblings separated but so happy that Victor was alive and protesting at the time of his rescue. Another great intervention, a very necessary one.

Thank you for all your good wishes for him today. This is wonderful. Dr Sharpe seemed to be very happy and relieved. Take care everyone. It has been such an intense day…I will see you tomorrow.

Thank you to Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies streaming cam at Fraser Point where I took my screen captures, to Lady Hawk for her video of Mama Thunder, CarnyXWild, and the Eagle Club of Estonia.

Another loss in Osprey Land…and other news in Bird World

7 July 2022

Good Morning Everyone. I hope that your day is bright with sunshine. A decade or kore ago, the summer temperatures in Winnipeg averaged 17-19 degrees C. Then for 4 or 5 years – perhaps a little more – they crept up to the high 20s with some days being 38 degrees. Today it is 19 C. A fantastic day for a walk and a check on the goslings later.

Yesterday I reported on one of the fledglings at the West End nest being in a dust up with another. I could not see any bands but made the assumption that it was one of the other siblings – forgetting that the 2-3 year old juveniles are returning to the Channel Islands. Lady Hawk cleared that up with a video noting it was an intruder that attacked Sky. A shout out to ‘B’ for letting me know!

Here is Lady Hawk’s video of that event:

I wondered how long it would be before more names were added to ‘the list’. That news arrived late last evening when ‘A’ wrote to me about the sadness at the Finnish Osprey nest of Miina and Marko. The feathers were found under the nest and it is believed that the nest was attacked, as others have been, by a henhawk. So sad. This nest site with its close proximity to the forest seems to be an unlucky one. Thank you, ‘A’ for letting me know.

Here is the information from Looduskalender:

"The nest equipped with a webcam in the Võrumaa osprey (Kalakotkas 1), where female Miina and male Marko nested with two eaglets, was soon taken down due to damage caused by lightning.

Today the nest was empty, the nest tree was all broken, the osprey, the young bird, was killed. The burglary could have happened a few days ago."

Happily, the osplets on the nest in Finland are healthy and safe – so far no attacks that I am aware. This is a natural Osprey nest – not a human made platform – 160 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is in the area known as Lapland and they have sunshine almost 24/7 this time of year.

Here is the link to this nest if you do not know it:

The osplets at nest #4 are simply gorgeous and it will not be long until they are ready to fledge. Oh, let us hope that the hawks do not come around!

If you would like to watch all of the Osprey nests in Finland at one time, here is that link: saaksilive.fi/live/kaikkikamerat

Dory is busy shading the three osplets at the Boathouse Osprey nest on Hog Island today. Gosh, isn’t she just a great first time Mum?!

We will never know if the hour long fireworks did any damage to the Bald Eagles hearing at the National Arboretum. Takoda, however, continues to be fed by Mr President on the nest – and this is a good thing because we get to see this gorgeous fledgling. Takoda was eating breakfast at 0628.

All around the world people continue to celebrate the little Red-tail Hawk, Malala, that survived from being the Bald Eagle’s dinner on Gabriola Island. It was always difficult to see Malala clearly on the streaming cam. Sharon Palmer-Hunt posted two photographs of Malala on the GROWLS FB page and, in case you didn’t see it, here she is:

Adorable. Like the fledgling Blue Jays, the Red-tail hawks have light blue or light blue-gray-green eyes. As they age, the eyes will turn a deep espresso brown.

Check out the tail below. How many dark bands does Malala have? Laura Culley suggests that they need at least 5 but better 6 to fledge. Malala has been flying for a little over a week (?) and she now has 8 or 9.

Our other favourite Red-tail hawk fledglings were caught hunting and playing around the Cornell Campus last evening by Suzanne Arnold Horning. Oh, they are adorable. She got all three! Thank you, ‘S’. All of us appreciate your efforts chasing these quick hawks around the campus so we can see them.

As the North American birds fledge, we will be moving our attention to Australia. One of the most adorable Peregrine Falcon couples is Xavier and Diamond at the scrape on the grounds of Charles Sturt University in Orange. They are not a young couple – considered middle age at 9 years old.

Xavier gets prey and stashes it in the corner of the scrape for Diamond. Diamond is very particular. She does not like European Starling!!!!!! It looks a nice pigeon for lunch today.

If you do not know this couple, here is the link to their camera. We will be expecting eggs in late August/early September.

Beautiful Diamond.

If you do not know this couple, here is the link to their streaming cam:

There is wonderful news coming from Estonia. We knew from the photograph that the trail camera took that Kaia had found the fish basket Urmas has provided this family so that it can feed the foster chick, Bonus. Now Urmas has posted a photograph showing Karl II finding the fish basket! The adults will require so much more food as the storklets grow bigger and bigger.

The wonderful experiment to save as many of Jan and Janika’s Black Stork fish appears to be working with the dedication of Urmas and his team. I want to find the donation button and post it again as the cost of the fish for the two – Karl II and Eedie families – is high. If you wanted to help and haven’t yet, there is still plenty of time.

I often have disagreements over intervention with some of my raptor associates. In the case of the Black Storks, they are extremely rare. It is possible that all of the fledglings from last year in Latvia and Estonia did not survive. (We await word on Udu). It is not, however, just the Black Storks. So many of the first year birds are lost in their first year. To put accurate data on the % is very difficult as the following academic article explains. Depending on the species it can be as much as 60% in the first year.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/share/RJQ8YWEPSPMKTMERURGU?target=10.1111/ibi.12355

That is why the intervention that we are seeing when adults die or birds in the nest get injured or knocked off is so important.

I was particularly moved by a statement ‘A’ made: “Now when I see an adult bird of any species, I am amazed that it made it to adulthood safely.”

‘H’ reports that there are now two chicks fledged from the Osprey nest in Carthage, Tennessee. Congratulations!

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. Have a wonderful day – or evening – wherever you are. Take care of yourselves. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams, personal images, and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, Finnish Osprey Foundation, NADC-AEF, GROWLS, Charles Sturt University Falcon Cam, Looduskalender, Suzanne Arnold Horning, and Explore.org and Audubon.

Late Monday and early Tuesday in Bird World

4-5 July 2022

Good Morning Everyone. It isn’t raining!!! The weather forecast was entirely wrong (so far). The sun is shining bright and it looks like it is going to be a fantastic day on the Canadian Prairies.

I mention Daisy the Duck quite often. It was Daisy that got me into loving ducks — despite the fact that I had a pet duck as a toddler – as an adult. She tried so hard – against the odds of a forest full of Crows and Ravens – to raise those little ones. I think it is why I am always out checking on the ducks at our local parks. But, today, I found a very interesting streaming cam and I thought I would share it with you. A female Wood Duck (oh, those females are so cute and sweet) has taken over an owl box and is sitting on eggs! Here is the link:

Fireworks. No one will ever invite me to their party! When we had our Canada Day celebrations there were fireworks set off 3 blocks away from the Peregrine Falcon scrape. I was equally upset and vocal locally – my comments could apply to any City.

Tonight, ‘B’ sent me a note about the fireworks and poor Takoda. 45 minutes later, they are still going off but are closer to the nest in the National Arboretum. Takoda is not the only wildlife impacted – every bird, every animal, every pet – and even humans – could have their hearing and/or breathing compromised. Tonight, I am ‘Miss Stick in the Mud’. At the same time I also wonder how much these big displays cost and how those funds could be used elsewhere. The US Government Accountability Office said that the display cost 19 million in 2019. Wow.

These are not silent fireworks either…just in case you were wondering. No, as ‘B’ said – it sounded like a battle zone. They started at 2109 on either side of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool and I still have screen captures near to 2200.

Someone may ask you ‘What is the importance of Raptors or Birds of Prey anyway?’ In 2013, the British Columbia government did a study on raptors titled, Guidelines for Raptor Conservation in Urban and Rural Land Development. Section 4.2 lists the benefits that raptors have for all of us – not just the residents of British Columbia. Indeed, there is a lot of wisdom in these 151 pages. Do look at section 4.2. It is quite interesting and not so long.

Checking in on the Black Stork intervention by Urmas, Kaia was caught on the camera finding the fish basket today. She returned and fed the four storklets who are growing and growing. Bonus appears to be fully integrated into the family.

You are doing great, Kaia. Look at those beautiful babies with those gorgeous black feathers. Just imagine. These four will take to the skies and fly all the way to the centre of Africa – and hopefully, return to Estonia.

The two chicks of Mr and Mrs AX6 at Llyn Brenig were ringed yesterday. One is showing off its new bling. Were we not just worried about these two in the cold rain last week and they were so tiny? Ringers think it is one female and one male. That gives the Welsh Osprey nests 6 females and 5 males so far.

Idris and Telyn have three big girls to feed and get off the ground. Some of the running jokes is that they are too heavy to fly! Pedran, Padarn, and Paith will do just fine. They will return in two years time looking for a Scottish mate, perhaps, or maybe they will check out any Rutland males that are about.

Aran and Mrs G have been keeping close watch over their territory today as it appears there are intruders about.

All of the nests seem to be doing very well. Dylan has brought a fish in and the three Bobs at Llyn Clywedog are being fed by Seren. It is a good way to keep one of them from taking over the fish – at least at the moment.

It looks like Blue NC0 has a nice crop – she looks so tiny compared to the two big chicks. So grateful that everything is going well on this nest after losing Little Bob. Should be two successful fledges soon.

Does everyone know Iris? the oldest Osprey in the world? She is, I believe 29 years old this year. Her nest is in Missoula, Montana and just look at that nest. Iris no longer has chicks. Her partner, Louis, since her devoted mate Stanley did not return, also has another nest in the baseball park with Star. Louis takes care of Star and her chicks. Every year Iris lays eggs and because one parent can’t do it all, the Crows or Ravens get them. Iris then spends the summer fishing, working on the nest, and taking care of herself. With the toll that chick raising takes on the female, this could be part of the secret to Iris’s longevity.

This morning Louis joined her early to keep intruders at bay but what interested me the most was how much work Iris has done on her nest. Just look at the amount of twigs! I wonder if Dr Green is going to gather up twigs from under the nest and have pens made as a fundraiser? The two I purchased from last year are beautiful and you can easily buy refills which makes them very sustainable.

Iris is a great fisher. Just look how strong she is. She has been working on this nest every day and it is so nice because we get to see her!

There is a lot of new nesting material arriving on the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest in Delaware. The kids were hoping for a nice big fish but it looks like new straw. Is Mum going to weave a basket?

I was interested in this image because of the dark bands on the tail. For Red-tail Hawks, you check to make sure that there are 5 dark bands. It is a simple trick to see if the chicks are near fledging. It seems to also apply to Osprey. These two are getting very close to being able to fly. Whether or not they will want to is another story.

At the Boathouse Osprey platform on Hog Island, everyone seems very happy with the morning feeding. Dory did a crack up job making sure all three were absolutely full – including Little Bob.

‘H’ sent a screen capture – so happy that the wee one had a bit of a private feeding filling up its crop. Yeah for Dory our first time Mum. Thanks so much for this great image, ‘H’. — Look at those little fat bottoms.

At the Osoyoos Osprey nest, it looks a little drier this morning. The kids have already had a small fish for their breakfast and are cuddled under Mum.

I don’t remember a pair of Cal Falcon fledglings that have loved to spend so much time together. It is such a delight to see Lindsay and Grinnell Jr play together – and what a welcome to relief to catch them on the camera of The Campanile.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Everything ‘appears’ to be quite fine in the nests that we have been watching. Fingers all crossed and toes, too, that it stays that way. Take care everyone — stay safe.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: NADC-AEF, Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender Forum, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Dyfi Osprey Project, CarnyXWild, Friends of the Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Montana Osprey Project and Cornell, Mispillion Osprey Project, Audubon, Osoyoos Ospreys, and Cal Falcons.

Good News on Little Bit ND17 and brief news in Bird World

Sunday 3 July 2022

Camaro with hay bale” by La Chachalaca Fotografía is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0.

Do you live in an area where farmer’s are baling hay or straw? and using baling twine? It was baling twine mixed in with some other nesting materials that caught on the male Ospreys talon at Osoyoos and pulled the chick off to fall to its death. Dr Erick Greene at the Montana Osprey Project finds literally tonnes of baling twine in the Osprey nests he studies. He also finds dead chicks and others nearly dead and tangled. If you live in a farming area help our Ospreys by spreading the word. Here is an information pamphlet that Dr Greene prepared – it is quick and to the point.

It is surprising that the nest at ND-LEEF is still holding. It looks like bits and pieces of it are falling away each day. Mum and Dad are still bringing fish to the nest for ND15 and 16.

15 was on the nest when the adult arrives with a nice fish. Soon 16 arrives.

I believe 15 kept the fish!

There is an update today on ND17 – and it is a good one. There is that sweet baby. It appears that individuals have been showing up at the clinic wanting to see 17. Please do not go there. The clinic staff has addressed this issue in their posting. ND17 is doing great and it is the clinic’s business to help him so that he can be returned to the wild. Everyone who works at a rehabilitation clinic is overworked and underpaid – it is a very sad situation in many instances where they do not get celebrity birds and good donations. Send them a thank you letter! Tell them you don’t expect a reply. Make a donation! Give to your local rehabber — I keep saying clean old towels but gosh, they are much needed. Give the towel a second life, too.

Isn’t he adorable?

Problems with nests and falling out of nests happens everywhere. It has been awhile since I checked on the two White-tail Eaglets in their nest in the Tucholskie Forest in Poland. Last time I remained somewhat cautious about the second chick surviving. Their names are Uno and Duo. (The third chick was a victim of siblicide). Uno fell off the nest and spent 4 days on the forest floor. He must have glided – as he flew back up to the nest. There are now some concerns that Duo has not been fed since 1 July and Uno is taking all the prey. They are big eaglets – just beautiful. Both will hopefully survive.

Sleeping and waiting for food.

Last year, Karl II and Kaia had three storklets. One of those Pikne who stayed with Karl II for a long time having him bring her food before fledging. She hatched on the 28th of May and fledged 4 August. She has a perfect flight to Ethiopia where she arrives on October 24, 2021. Pikne stayed in Africa and set off for her return flight to Estonia. She was in Israel on 1 June 2022 and everyone was so happy to see her transmitter working. Sadly, on 6 June, she on a power line and was killed in the middle of nowhere in Turkey. Such promise. A day does not go by without adding another one to ‘the list’.

Pikne is the storklet getting ready to stand up at the front.

As ‘S’ reminded me last year, countries can make laws that power companies must make their poles safe for wildlife but the companies must follow through in a timely manner. Last fall we lost Solly in South Australia and the individuals that make up Port Lincoln Osprey were on a mission to get the government to fix the power poles. Must check with them to see how they are doing. It is, sadly, a worldwide issue for our beautiful raptors and storks. In Pikne’s case, it is thought that she was tired and landed to rest as there was no place to feed near that pole — so it is not just poles near feeding areas but all poles that should have a protective cover.

This is the nest of Karl and Kaia this morning. Bonus made no reaction to Karl II which means that he has accepted him as his father, the male on the nest and is home with the three siblings. This is such good news for the success of the intervention by Urmas and Dr Madis V. Actually it is fantastic news.

What can you do to help so that our beautiful birds are not electrocuted? Here is a story of a Bald Eagle and an individual who got their power company to retrofit the power lines – 12 of them – in their neighbourhood. Remember! Each of us can make a difference by seeking solutions for the birds that live where we do.

Most everyone is following the story of Malala, the Red-tail hawklet meant for dinner but adopted by the Gabriola Island Bald Eagle family. This article covers this adventure from the beginning to the present. It is a really good read.

Every once in awhile I feel compelled to give a shout out to the New Zealand government and specifically their Department of Conservation (NZ DOC). I wonder how many of my readers follow the exploits of the Royal Cam chick on Taiaroa Head? There she is – QT (Quarry Track) chick doing her morning stretches. What a beauty.

This year has seen at least 10 supplementary feedings for QT and a few of the other chicks on the peninsula. Her parents are YRK and OGK. Just like Janika could not provide enough food for her storklets alone, neither can YRK. There is little talk on the Royal Cam FB group but the much beloved OGK was last seen on the 19th of May. Some believe he came in on June 10 but that is not confirmed and many believe it was not him but, rather, YRK. OGK doesn’t choose to not return to feed his chicks. He is one of the most devoted Royal Albatross I have ever seen. He is either injured or dead. Two years ago OGK suffered a leg injury and returned limping after 40 days. If the 19 of May date is correct – he is missing for 46 days now. Send all good wishes his way, please.

US Steel Eagle 4 (USS4) is in care from tumbling out of the tree with severe feather injuries but USS5 is doing great – learning how to fly and returning to the nest for prey from the parents. Congratulations 5 – you are doing very well, indeed.

‘H’ reports that Dory has really mastered the art of feeding her three osplets on the Boathouse Osprey nest – making sure that each and everyone has bites. Dory purposefully gave Little Bob several nice mouth fulls this morning. Fantastic. Thank you ‘H’.

Dad was in early with fish for Mum and the two osplets on the Osoyoos Osprey Platform. It was 0554. Fingers crossed!

That is a brief look at some of the news today. Everyone seems to be doing well.

It is not a good image – taken with my phone at a distance. But this is the tiny rabbit that comes to the garden now grown – 4x his size. Grass and birdseed!

In celebration of ND17s progress, I am sending each of you a virtual piece of that Yokohama Orange cake…Sorry to all food designers. Fall plate and spring flowers! But delicious cake…it was worth all the effort.

Thank you for joining me today. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB postings where I took my screen captures: Humane Wildlife Indiana, The Eagle Club of Estonia, Bieliki Online Bory Tucholskie, NZ DOC, ND-LEEF, Explore and Audubon, Pix Cams, Osoyoos Osprey Cam, and GROWLS.

1H1 fledges at Rutland and other news in Bird World

Saturday. 2 July 2022

The fireworks in my City for those celebrating Canada Day at the historical meeting point of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers started around 10:30 Friday evening and – continued in what seemed private locations – until around 0200 Saturday morning.

In their studies, the Animal Ethics Board has found that fireworks can cause permanent hearing damage in wild animals and pets. They say, “The hearing of many animals is much more sensitive than it is in humans, so the explosions of fireworks are not only more disturbing to them, but they can damage their hearing more severely. Fireworks can emit sounds of up to 190 decibels (110 to 115 decibels above the range of 75 to 80 decibels where the damage to the human ear begins). Fireworks generate a higher noise level than firecrackers, gunshots (140 decibels), and some jet planes (100 decibels).” Zoos report that wild animals such as cheetahs have continued stress with repeated noises – something that causes phobias of noises in pets.

It is not only the noise. Fireworks release harmful and poisonous particles in the air such as fine dust PM10 that is toxic when inhaled. Here is an excellent article that provides much information on the damage that fireworks cause. It is a good read.

I was also delighted to see another monofilament line disposal tube when I was at Wildlife Haven yesterday by the pond. I wonder if we can get our City to place these at fishing spots along the river? and actually have people clean them??

A wonderful conversation with a fellow bird lover caused a discussion about Imperial Eagles and weights of eagles and well – all things stork and eaglet! In the posting about Little Bit, the staff at Humane Wildlife Indiana stated that he weighed 2.7 kg or 6 lbs. In his study of Bald Eagles and in other research since, Northern Bald Eagles (Michigan and Alaska, Canada) are larger than those hatched in the South (Florida and Texas). In addition, fledglings are larger but lighter than their parent of the same gender. Because he survived on so little food, it is unclear what gender Little Bit is – I have always referred to him as a male because he is so tiny. At any rate, the conclusion is that he is 50% underweight and should be approximately 4.08 kg or 9 lbs.

So far over $2500 has been donated to care for Little Bit! The Notre Dame Eagles FB group is hoping that will reach $3000 by the 4th of July. That would be fantastic.

You may have tried to find the little storklets inside the vet clinic in Estonia but, they are not there and there is no camera. They were named Bonus, Janus, and Junior. Their nest was moved outside near the clinic. But, also, there are no storklets there. Bonus was moved to live with Karl II and Kaia in the Karula National Forest. Janus has been placed in the nest of male Eedi (no camera) and sadly, little Junior fell and broke its wing in many places. Here is the statement from Urmas:

Bonus has adapted to living with Karl and Kaia and their three chicks and just a moment ago I got word from ‘T’ that “a trail camera was placed next to the nest and its pictures show that the foster child has also adapted to life in the nest like Bonus.” This is excellent news. Now they can spend the last part of their nest life being with live storks, growing, fledging, and migrating. So happy for the team in Estonia.

“At night I brought back the chick to the outdoor nest in vet clinic. That is actually the same nest you watched, we moved it in whole from indoor isolator box outside. So the chicks knew the nest nearly 20 days already. If placed back the chick which travelled, I added some fish to the nest. As it was in darkness, they did not see the fish, but probably noticed the food in morning. It is speculation, but there had to be some accident in early morning. Maybe they started to fight for fish and smallest appeared in wrong position. It is only about 1m from ground, but for quite fat juvenile it could be too high, if to fall to the side, with opened wing… Nobody could enter there simply so to disturb the chicks, so it is not easily understandable accident, with that serious injury.
Today there will be another attempt to add fourth chick in natural nest.”

Bonus is well integrated into the family now. I am delighted for the team who worked so hard at interventions that would save Jan and Janika’s chicks. Two have survived. This is a feeding by Karl II showing how well Bonus and the other biological chicks are doing.

A conversation with a friend in France led me to return to check on the Imperial Eaglets whose nest is in Russia. They are so gorgeous and the two of them are big! Have you been checking in on them?

They are just getting their juvenile feathers. Have a look at their size in relation to the female. Beautiful – and two of them!

Big Red and Arthur’s Ls are really quite amazing. I am shocked at their flying skills – although I would like them to stop flying so low over Tower Road! They are also doing a lot of ‘hunting’ along the fence lines. Suzanne Arnold Horning took these images this morning. Thank you SAH for allowing me to share!

It is what we have been waiting for – a fledge at the Rutland nest of Maya and Blue 33 – those three big girls. It was 1H1 that took off and returned first! Congratulations on your first fledge of the 2022 season Rutland.

The departure was at 0534:

The return!

There are three growing chicks this morning in the Boathouse on Hog Island. Sadly, we now have to count them carefully after so many spills out of the nests this year.

Skiff.

Dory and the three chicks. They are now in the Reptile phase. Their plumage is changing and they will appear thin and lanky. It is often, during this phase, that they also begin beaking one another. It is a period of very rapid growth and they require lots of fish.

Osplets triple their body weight during the first 8 days and then during the next 4 days they will double that weight. In the Reptilian Phase which begins at about 20 days, the osplets will molt all their lovely light grey down and it will be replaced with the darker thermal down. Feathers begin to emerge and you will also see a lot of preening. I do not know if the growth and itchiness of the feathers causes osplets to get anxious and aggressive but on nests with lots of fish you often see some beaking before the juvenile feathers are really starting to emerge.

Dory and the chicks.

There are three chicks on the Fortis Exshaw Nest in Canmore, Alberta. Yes! The nest is holding. They were enjoying a nice fish when I checked in on them this morning.

The two at Osoyoos are also still on the nest and their feathers also appear to be changing into the Reptilian Phase. I watched one lean way over the side of the nest — a little scary. Fingers crossed for this family!

The two older osplets at the Mispillion nest are doing great! This is a nest that needs information – dates eggs laid, hatch dates, etc. These two have a full body of juvenile feathers. Fledge is not long off.

It is noon on the Canadian Prairies and it is a gorgeous blue sky day with bright sunshine. The three Blue Jay fledglings have more feathers and are so quick to get into the lilacs to hide from my camera and to eat the solid nutty cylinder – well, I would like to get a good look at them! At one time Mr Crow was taking exception to their presence on his turf but that seems to also have settled. Little Red is happily settled in his new tree home and the three little ones are as big as he is today. I might get some images of them today. Hedwig was here yesterday as was the wee baby rabbit who is now 3x the size he was when I first spotted him in the grass. This afternoon I am going to try and a new park for walking and bird watching. I hope to have some images for you later today.

Thank you for joining me. Take care everyone! See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Humane Wildlife Indiana, EMU, LRWT, Mispillion Osprey Cam and DDNR, Explore and Audubon, Osoyoos Osprey Cam, Suzanne Arnold Horning and Cornell Chatters FB Page, Russian Imperial Eagle Cam, and Fortis Exshaw.

Late Saturday in Bird World

4 June 2022

It was a fantastic day on the Canadian prairies. Clear blue sky. Sun shining bright and everyone happy – even smiling and saying ‘hi’ on the trails. Sadly, the birds thought it was beautiful too and they must have all gone sight-seeing! There were some American White Pelicans – 7 to be exact – hanging out with 9 Double-Breasted Cormorant. A female Hooded Merganser. A family of Canada Geese! And many Red-wing Blackbirds protecting territories where there were obvious nests. It was still nice to be outside with the sun beating down even if there had been not a single bird in sight.

There were two females on nests and these three goslings with their parents. This place should be crawling with goslings – everywhere. The flood really did a lot of harm.

The Redwing Blackbirds appear to have sentinels that stand watch or follow humans trying to lure us to one spot or another away from the nests.

There has not been a lot of time to check on all the nests. I wanted to see if Little Bit 17 had any food. He had an entire fish to himself yesterday but he needs food every day! It won’t always get it, sadly. Not on this nest. At 19:02:47 a Bluegill at 19:02:47. Everyone sort of looked at Dad and the fish. Then at 19:04:57 Little Bit stole it! I cannot tell you if he got any fish to eat but he worked on it until 16 – the one who beaks him – stole it from him. Then 15 took it and Little Bit moved over by the porch and did the snatch and grab and got some fish. There could be another delivery later.

It is not a huge fish.

Little Bit was quick! And he took advantage of a good situation. It is too bad that Dad didn’t just block the other two!

16 has the fish and 15 is going to get it away. Little Bit is at the top left watching and listening. Little Bit knows if 15 gets the fish he will get some food.

There is a scab forming over the bad peck that 16 gave Little Bit the other day.

Little Bit is by the tree snatching and grabbing bites from 15 as 16 watches.

At 17:37 Little Bit gets the fish head and moves with it to the top railing where he feeds off it until 17:50! Well done Little Bit 17! You will clean that head of every bit of fish flake like no one else. So happy.

Janika has been regularly feeding the storklets. The last feeding was at 22:54:10. The four have eaten well today. I thought maybe she would stay with them during the night but she is off hunting for food. Urmas has not removed any of the chicks. Perhaps Janika can make this work! I hope so. I wish she would find the fish basket provided for her.

The last two eggs hatched for White Storks Bukacek and Betty at their Mlade Buky nest in The Czech Republic. I cannot help but think that the two smallest will become brood eliminations but, maybe not. That is a lot of mouths to feed.

At the Cal Falcons scrape, Annie and Alden have done the most amazing job raising these two eyases. They are huge – full of energy and life and absolutely healthy. We will be forever grateful that the Avian Flu did not manifest itself in the West so that these two can take flight. Their names could not be more perfect – Lindsay and Grinnell Jr.

Meals happen outside of the scrape now and the chicks run up and down flapping their huge wings. Seriously – look at that wing!

These two have great fun playing with one another. Have a look:

There is something so stunning about the plumage of juvenile Ospreys – the patterning, the beautiful black and white. I do think they are much more gorgeous than the adults. Don’t tell them! Middle has been working his wings since Big fledged.

These two have eaten well. Mum and Dad really filled them up yesterday after getting Big back on the nest for breakfast. And it is nice that the heavy rains forecast for Gainesville as part of the Tropical Storm did not materialize.

The five falcons at the Manchester NH scrape have almost lost all of their baby down. It is really something when food comes to the scrape. All are fed but oh, my what mayhem!

Aran and Mrs G are doing fine with the osplets. It is a wonderful streaming cam because you can hear rural Wales – the sheep bleating and the cows mooing. It is quite lovely if you live in a city like I do.

Despite the strong winds at the Dyfi nest, Idris and Telyn are keeping the osplets nicely fed and hunkered down. Bobbi Bach has really eaten well. He hatched on the 28th of May and is a week old today. Happy Week Birthday!

Poor Telyn. The wind has done a mess of her feathers.

When the third egg hatched at the Loch of the Lowes, I held my breath. It took Blue NC0 a few days to get it together to feed three. Now just look at them. Unbelievable. Lots of fish and this is what happens – fluffy little Osprey chicks with their soft grey down turn into Reptiles. Little Bob is not having any trouble. There he is in the middle of the pack at Mum’s beak.

All over England they are celebrating the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee but in Poole Harbour everyone continues to be delighted in the first three – yes, the third hatched – ospreys to hatch in Poole Harbour in more than 200 years!

In fact, of the birds translocated from Scotland to Poole Harbour over the course of a couple of years, three are now breeding. It has been an enormous success and a shout out should go to Roy Dennis Wildlife for his steadfast belief that you could re-introduce birds to a location by using hatches from another area (Scotland in this case).

You can read all about CJ7 and Blue 022 on Roy Dennis’s website here:

https://www.roydennis.org/category/latest-news/

Roy Dennis writes extensively about this project in his book, Restoring the Wild.

Big Red took a break from parenting to sit on the lights in the sun today. It is quite crowded on that nest now!

The light was not so good to see the eyases but it was good to show the dark bands on the chick in front of the light box. There are five clear dark bands on that chick. From the length of that tail in comparison to the bird to its right, it has to be L1. I would suspect that there are actually 6 clear bands. She is ready to fledge!

What a year it has been for Big Red and Arthur with four eyases on the nest! Even at 19 Big Red continues to surprise us and keep us in awe. She is an incredible hawk and hawk Mum!

Thank you for joining me for this quick look at a few nests today. Take care. See you soon.

NOTE: My Sunday report will come in the late evening.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Woodland Trust, Cornell Bird Lab and RTH, ND-LEEF, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Poole Harbour Ospreys, Cal Falcons, Peregrine Networks, Mlade Buky Stork Cam, and the Eagle Club of Estonia.

Urmas creates a miracle for Janika and her storklets!

3 June 2022

The people who live in Lithuania and Estonia treasure their Black Storks. When something happens the Ornithologists and persons in charge of the nests do their best to intervene in a positive way.

Urmas set up a fish basket that he is stocking to feed the storklets. He has taken the decoy up to the nest with a basket of fish.

No one knew if it would work – and tears, tears rolling down people’s faces and jumping up and down ———. They are stuffed.

Things were getting very dire on the nest as the Mum was so hungry also. Now we can celebrate. While it is a tragedy that Janika has lost her mate, Urmas and his helpers are providing fish to keep her and the chicks alive. It is fantastic. This is a very positive intervention!

Thank you for being with me on such a positive occasion. Take care!

Thank you to Looduskalender and Liz for this postings and for the video of Janika feeding the storklets.

Late Tuesday and early Wednesday in Bird World

31 May – 1 June 2022

Oh, it is absolutely perfect at the Big Valley nest of Jackie and Shadow. Spirit fledged early Tuesday morning and she is back home being fed by Shadow at 16:46 the same day. You could hear Spirit squeeeeeeeeing on the nest cam. Dad flew in with a big fish and ate a bit and in flies Spirit. This is excellent. She will return to the nest – she knows where it is – and the parents will continue to feed her for a period of time until she is catching her own fish. She will perfect her flying and she will be a success.

Shadow arrives on the nest with a nice big fish.

Spirit arrives not long after. Oh, it is so sweet that Spirit wants to be fed ——-and fantastic of Shadow to want to feed his Spirit!

When dinner was over, Dad and his little girl sat and looked out at their world together.

Spirit remains at the nest. I hope she stays all night. It is so wonderful seeing her back on the nest, eating, and in good shape. She knows where ‘home’ is!

Spirit spent the night on the nest branch. This is just fantastic. Hopefully she will fly and get her wings strong and come home to eat and spend the night in the nest tree so we can see she is alright!

Gosh, it is hard waiting for parents to bring in food to a nest that really needs it. The lull at the ND-LEEF nest gave me an opportunity to ‘look at’ Little Bit 17 a little closer.

The Middle sibling ND16 has been the one ‘plucking’ Little Bit’s feathers from his head. When she gets aggressive about the food or lack of food, she goes for the head. It appears to me that she has pulled out more feathers today than on Sunday or Saturday. It looks like a red spot on the back but no big infected areas. To my knowledge, the eldest sibling 15 has not attacked Little Bit 17, only 16. So she is getting agitated when food is not coming on the nest.

Besides the missing head feathers, you will notice that Little Bit’s flight feathers are growing and showing.

This is a horrific viscous attack by an older sibling.

The image below was taken two days ago on the 29th. It offers some comparison with the loss of feathers on the head.

This is May 28 – three days ago. From this image I have to conclude that 16 is getting more and more aggressive towards Little Bit 17.

So is this a big problem? Yes and yes and no. The feathers on the head do not impact Little Bit 17’s ability to fly. That is the good point. Are they going to grow back quickly? No. It looks like the older sibling has pulled out the hair follicle completely. When bird’s molt (typically once a year), the loss of that feather stimulates the growth of the new feather. If Little Bit 17 found itself in a rehab centre they would probably be applying antiseptic ointment to its head. The other issue is that growing feathers is known as being ‘nutritionally intensive’. It takes a lot of calories along with vitamins and minerals to get feather regrowth. Some of you may have birds and know this. You can purchase products from your vet to help with regrowth. Some nervous birds can pluck out their own feathers. Sadly, we cannot get a vet up to the nest with these supplements nor can we fly in fish — and believe me, I wish I could put three big beauties on that nest!

Some people on the chat thought that Little Bit 17 had a bit of a crop.

It looks like it from this image below. Did he go into his stash on the porch and find some food? It is unknown.

At 20:31:21 an adult landed on the nest with a prey item. It was taken immediately by an older sibling.

Little Bit 17 stayed out of the way.

It is unclear what happened on the morning of 1 June on the ND-LEEF nest. I cannot see any prey delivered before a squirrel arrives around noon. 16 got it, then 15 stole it, and 17 is lurking hoping that 15 will leave it something. All are, of course, hungry.

17 is getting closer to 15. I am certain 17 would eat the tail if that was all that was left.

Hard to tell what will happen. 16 has moved over between 17 and 15 and is more concerned about 17 than anything. I really hope he does not pluck any more of 17’s head feathers. That is just crazy.


There is still squirrel left. You can see it when 15 pulls hard. He almost goes backwards out of the nest with that squirrel. Oh, I hope 17 gets a chance and 16 is not going to grab the prey.

16 wants to steal it. 17 is staying out of the way of 16. We need a huge fish to arrive right now. Leave 16 with the squirrel and 15 and 17 get fed by Mum!

Well, the San Francisco nest of Richmond and Rosie could offer to send some of their spare fish to ND! Today Rosie went fishing and brought in a nice whopper for the two osplets. Shortly after Richmond arrives with an equally large fish! And the kids already had big crops. Of course, there seem to be always intruders about wanting to steal the fish Richmond and/or Rosie bring to the nest on the Whirley Crane. Location, location, location! Some nests have great territory and prey and others don’t. Richmond and Rosie have a gold one – along with Arthur and Big Red at Cornell.

What lucky little osplets these two are – hatched at this nest with these two incredibly hard working parents. You will notice that Rosie is fishing, too, and delivering food. Her babies are just entering the Reptilian Phase. Some of the females pull more than their weight to ensure the success of their brood.

No one is going to be hungry today!

It is 0440 Wednesday morning at the Dyfi nest of Telyn and Idris and the three Bobs. They are having a nice breakfast of last night’s Mullet. Super chicks.

Little Bob got a nice piece of fish. Most of the time everything is fine at Dyfi. Big Bob does like to be a bit of a bully but that will pass. There is regular food on this nest.

The Three Bobs had breakfast at Loch of the Lowes, too. Laddie had a great fish and everyone is eating. Bites all around. The trio are growing and starting to get their dark wooly plumage. Reptiles next!

Louis and Dorcha have been feeding their first hatch regularly. Louis has kept the nest nicely supplied — like he always does! They are going to zoom the camera in so that we can see the chicks better. This will be left for about a week. Thank you Woodland Trust!

History was made again today in Poole Harbour when the first osprey chick hatched! Congratulations CJ7 and Blue 022!!!!!!!!!! The nest and camera are positioned so that we can only see CJ7 bring up the egg shell, removing it from the nest cup. How thrilling. There will be parties in the south of England and in the homes of all who were a part of this great relocation project. It is a success.

There are three at the Glaslyn nest of Aran and Mrs G now. All their hatching is now finished. Lots of fish – and some of it is flounder. Mrs G doesn’t like it but hey ——we know a lot of eagles and ospreys that wouldn’t care what species of fish it was! The third chick hatched on 30 May.

I continue to watch and forget to report on the Golden Eagles in Estonia. The parents are Kalju (Dad) and Helju (Mum) and their chick Margit. So cute. There nest is in the Sooma National Park in the southwestern part of Estonia.

Golden Eagles often hunt as a couple. They are known to dive down to their prey (called quarry) at speeds of 150 mph. They have great maneuverability and they can see clearly and in colour for a very long distance. One eagle might dive and drive the prey out for the other. They also hunt alone catching rabbits, squirrels, Pine Martens, foxes, and even deer. They will also eat carrion if fresh prey is low. Unlike the Black Stork, Golden Eagles are fairly common in Estonia.

Margit is a little cutie.

Here is the link to their camera:

Karl II and Kaia’s three Black Storklets in the Karula National Forest in Estonia are also doing very well. There is one egg remaining in the nest which was laid on 1 May. If it is to hatch it will be soon.

Karl II has the transmitter on his leg and he is on the nest now. Both parents are active in fishing and bringing food to the nest for the chicks who have incredible appetites.

The five storklets of Jan and Janika, also in Estonia, are doing really well. The parents have not done any sorting out of the smaller ones. This is incredible. There must be lots of food for everyone this year.

While we wait for the official names of the two chicks, Alden continues to bring in prey items for the eyases who are growing and getting interested in the world outside the scrape. What a quick hand over! Off for more!!!!!!!

Alden is also doing a fantastic job of feeding the two eyases.

The Great Spirit Bluff eyases continue to grow and are changing their plumage just like the chicks at Cal Falcon’s scrape.

There was bad weather in South Australia on the 29th of May. That is the last log in and report on Ervie. Port Lincoln says he managed to stay out of the wind and rain by staying close to the silos. Here is his map of that day. Sure miss seeing him at the barge!

And to put a smile on everyone’s face, a Dove has decided to make her nest on a palm frond at my son’s house in the West Indies. The couple will incubate their eggs for 12-14 days. The chicks will be born with their eyes closed and will be covered with a soft grey down. They will remain in the nest being fed by their parents for about 11 days before fledging.

It looks like a Common Ground Dove. They are very common across the Eastern Caribbean and can grow to 15-18 cm or 6 to 7 inches or about the same size as a large House Sparrow. They lay 1-3 eggs. They eat seeds and insects.

It is sunny today and no rain. I am heading out to enjoy this beautiful day and hopefully see some American White Pelicans and some ducks. Hopefully a few other Waterfowl surprises. Take care everyone. Thank you for being here with me in Bird World. Wish for fish to land on the ND-LEEF nest! Nasty 16 is busy eating the rest of the squirrel so hopefully 17 can have some lunch if something comes in! See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: fOBBV, ND-LEEF, SF Ospreys and Golden Gate Audubon, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Wildlife Trust, Brywd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Poole Harbour Ospreys, Friends of Loch Arkaig, the Woodland Trust and the People’s Post Code Lottery, Eagle Club of Estonia, Cal Falcons, Port Lincoln Osprey Project FB page, and Explore.org