Late Saturday in Bird World

2 July 2022

How many of you have tried to watch the streaming bird cams or Ferris Akel’s Tour (or both at the same time) and tried to cook dinner and bake a cake? Well, that is what I am trying to do without much success with any of them! OK. I shouldn’t say that. ‘The Cake’ is going to be delicious but it has to sit for 24 hours.

For those of you from Japan or living in Japan, it is a Yokohama Orange Cake. I am trying to replicate the one made by Hamasuzu in that city. They make some brandy cakes and cookies that are quite famous but their orange cake makes you remember it years later and well, your mouth starts to water. I will take a photo when I cut it and let you know if it is good – it took 20 oranges for the rind and the juice. Yum….I wish I could send everyone a piece.

Ferris Akel has the Ls on his streaming cam tour at the moment. He has found Big Red and Arthur and all three of the Ls. They are so cute.

The Ls continue to fly low across Tower Road. There are signs about the Osprey fledglings but I wish – as do many others I am sure – that Cornell would close tower road from fledging to the end of July.

L4 is a real cutie pie. He has a full crop and is going to sleep well tonight!

There is some very good information on Ospreys in this short article. I was looking for something else and found it.

It is fledge watch for the two Osplets at Mispillion Harbour Osprey platform next week. ‘H’ was able to locate a list of the hatch dates, sort of. The information by the Du Pont Centre is not detailed enough. There were originally five eggs. We are going to assume that the two chicks on the nest hatched on 19 May. That makes them 44 days old. Pandion Carolinis Ospreys fledge from 50-55 days normally.

Mom really loves anything that is a kind of yellow colour. The Vodka bottle flew out of the nest but the yellow mat is still there somewhere. Now there is another bag!

In his studies of the four different species of Osprey, Alan Poole notes that the North American Ospreys, the Carolinensis often like to bring items to the nest! As opposed to the other three species.

I sure hope this blows off the nest. There have been way too many accidents of chicks – even large ones close to fledging – being throw off the nests and dying when all this ‘junk’ ‘garbage’ is brought onto the nest.

According to Ervie’s tracking, he has been swinging by the barge but he has not been stopping by. It didn’t take long for Mum to get the message out? 2 or 3 times??

Oh, wouldn’t you just love to see Ervie??

Aran has really been piling the fish on the nest for Mrs G and the kids. She spent 2 entire hours feeding them a huge flounder. Just when she was done, Aran landed with a very large Sewin. Those kids are going to pop.

There is the flounder.

The Osprey nests in the UK have consistently seen large prey except up at the Loch of the Lowes when Laddie was bringing in some twiddlers.

I don’t know why but I am still a little concerned about the third hatch at the Boathouse on Hog Island. I hope I am just being a worrisome auntie. Fingers crossed for this young family.

There are still two on the Osoyoos Osprey Platform and they still make me nervous! Why do they all love to hang over the edge?!

Not an Osprey but the female at the Glacier Gardens Bald Eagle Nest, Liberty, really does like to bring plastic bags to the nest!

Look closely. Little feathers are starting to poke through on the wing tips.

There is lots of activity at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta. In the first image look carefully near the centre top. All three fledglings were chasing Akecheta for the fish.

Kana’kini might have it between her talons at 12:38 but…

KK sees one of her siblings coming.

She mantles.

Then she leaves the fish and goes behind the nest.

She goes back and really mantles the fish.

Here comes Sky entering from the left.

It was quite the dust up with Sky getting the prize fish at 12:41:11 – or so it appears. I cannot see the leg band to be sure and they were fighting around the end of the nest.

When the fledgling flies off the nest with the fish you still cannot see the leg band! Frustrating.

That is just a very quick look at the nests. I will continue to check on a few that could have problems although we seem to have had enough for a decade this season. I hope everyone had a really beautiful Saturday. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams or FB postings where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and The Institute for Wildlife Studies, Ferris Akel Tours, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Mispillion Harbour Ospreys, Glacier Gardens, Osoyoos Ospreys, Explore.org and Audubon, and Port Lincoln Ospreys.

Early Wednesday in Bird World

29 June 2022

The walk in the forest and seeing some beautiful songbirds and several woodpeckers yesterday afternoon was lovely. “Forest Bathing” or shinrin-yoku. I have mentioned this word and the concept many times before but I highly recommend going for a walk outside with the trees if you are able. You can just sit, too. It is highly relaxing and really does remove stress. To my delight, there were a few – three- goslings. There should be some slightly older goslings about somewhere but I could not find them. There are lots and lots of fish in the water even in areas with lots of algae cover. I hope the Bald Eagle couple are taking the fish and not the goslings!

This little gosling was skipping along between its parents. Only one for them it appears.
This Canada Goose couple have two goslings. In former years I would have seen hundreds of goslings.
The little red squirrel was enjoying the seeds being dropped on the ground at the feeding station.
Little female Downy woodpecker was working really hard to get the peanuts.
There were lots of American Goldfinches at the feeding station today. This very dominant male did not want to share!

Still, the worry for Little Bit 17 and the disappointment that nothing has been done to secure an assessment on his condition is becoming more bewildering.

This is the status of the nest Wednesday morning. There is no possible way that the three birds – 15, 16, and 17 could last on this fast deteriorating nest very long.

This is precisely the situation that little Yurruga was in at the Orange Australian scrape. His feathers were not fully developed but he did fledge and fly only to have torrential rain and die. Little Bit now requires food. Is he catching mice and things? Maybe. But does anyone know that for sure? and has he moved a significant amount to show that he is actually mobile? And why not call in the experts to assess him?

I needed a laugh and ‘R’ sent me the shortest video from the NADC-AEF nest that did just that. Perhaps you need a giggle, too.

I wonder how many times a hawklet is taken to a Bald Eagle nest as a prey item and winds up being raised by the Bald Eagles? It happened in 2017 in Sydney, BC with Spunky and currently Malala is part of an eagle family on Gabriola Island. There is another nest in Ohio with a Red tail Hawklet being raised by the eagles!

https://www.dispatch.com/story/lifestyle/nature-wildlife/2022/06/18/red-tailed-hawk-found-being-raised-among-bald-eagle-family/7607615001/?fbclid=IwAR2TenANChmQsBasSZLlvSMAwG_HvRRNhH3Z0b3tPGOtEKnqKsFcmtnZq5k

Malala is still doing so well at the Bald Eagle nest. Lady Hawk just released a video showing her mantling two prey deliveries on Tuesday. How grand! When she was forced fledged and found her way up to the nest, everyone was so happy. Hopefully she will continue to thrive on the nest until she is really ready to do a lot of flying about.

So how many trout did Aran bring for Mrs G and the three Bobs before the rains began? On two consecutive days, he brought in 8 trout and the following day it was 13. Wow. Mrs G was more than delighted – .

Richmond has been busy bring in the fish to Rosie and the Two Bobs, too.

The two fledglings at the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest wish that their Dad would bring in a lot of fish for them, too! Dad might be thinking they need to go to the local lakes and give fishing a try! I understand that the camera will be turned off at the end of the month so check out these two. They are beauties.

The little Lesser Spotted Eaglet at the Zemgale, Latvian nest of Uldis and Laila is called Hugo. Uldis has been bringing in rats, mice, and small birds to the nest. Hugo is doing well and growing so fast.

It is another wet day in Wales at the Dyfi nest of Idris and Telyn. Perhaps today is ringing day. Last year there were two chicks. Dysynni was the heaviest male chick in history. Many still think that perhaps Dysynni is a female. Measurements can be taken but to know 100% DNA tests need to be done. They are expensive for the nature centres and most often not undertaken.

It dried out for the Dyfi nest and the three chicks were ringed. The Darvic numbers are Bob 1 = 7B0 Bob 2 = 7B1 and Bob 3 = 7B2. None of them are Bobs – they are three girls! Telyn’s mother, Maya, also had three girls at the Manton Bay nest at Rutland this year. The Manton Bay chicks are getting ready to fledge.

There is currently a vote going on at the Dyfi Osprey project chat with the streaming cam. Question. Should the names of the three girls start with the same letter? or not?

It looks like it is another miserable wet day for Mrs G and Aran and the kids at Glaslyn. I wonder if Ospreys get sick of the rain like human animals do?

The Glaslyn nest dried off in the afternoon, too. Thankfully! Aran has been out chasing an intruder. Not good.

Blue NC0 is waiting for the morning breakfast fish to be brought to the Loch of the Lowes nest. As I was looking at her nest it occurred to me that it is a rare thing to see human garbage on these UK nests. Yes, the occasional carrier bag but even that is rare compared to nests in North America.

The females on the Manton Bay nest at Rutland of Maya and Blue 33 are wet on Wednesday morning – and they are waiting for Dad to bring in the breakfast fish!

By the afternoon, everyone is dry and the three girls have been doing some hovering. Aren’t they gorgeous?

I love California Condors. There is a little chick in the cliff nest at Tom’s Canyon. Cornell has set up a camera in collaboration with the USFWS. They posted a really nice video showing a feeding caught on the camera. Notice how the little one flaps its wings in anticipation of the arrival of the adult and some much wanted food.

When I went to check on Richmond and Rosie again, I was tired, too, and felt just like Rosie. If you look for an osprey nest to add to your list for next year, Richmond and Rosie are highly recommended! SF Ospreys.

The Dad at the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest brought in a really super fish before dawn this morning. In the process Mum’s foot hit that vodka bottle and it went flying off the nest. ‘H’ caught the action and sent me a clip saying ‘Mispillion cannot be considered the party nest any longer!’. Absolutely. Thank you, ‘H’.

https://youtube.com/clip/UgkxsM8D4em7CFUXnX_dYlI4JT-_ljpkI60r

Lindsay made an early appearance on The Campanile ledge this morning. Gosh, those two fledgling falcons are looking so good and so strong in their flying. Yeah for Annie and Alden teaching them to survive in the wild!

Have you ever noticed that it is when one osprey looks directly into the eye of another that they often have a bit o a dust up?

The two Bobs at the Loch Arkaig nest of Louis and Dorcha did just that. Dorcha has been having to deal with an intruder thought to be a non-breeding female.

The two eaglets of Liberty and Freedom at the Glacier Gardens nest are getting their thermal down. Oh, goodness have they grown. Mum still, sadly, likes to bring in plastic bags!

Suzanne Arnold Horning posted some fantastic images of Big Red and Arthur’s fledglings of 2022, the Ls. Thank you Suzanne for allowing me to share! Gosh those Ls are cute – and doing so well. The three like to spend time together, too! How interesting. Just like Lindsay and Grinnell Jr do – playing and enjoying life.

Big Red and Arthur are delivering prey. Prey drops are often on top of buildings where it is safe for the Ls to eat. They are also expanding the area on campus where the fledglings go to hunt. This also strengthens their flying. Fantastic family. Highly recommended for your list of nests to watch next year.

There is no update on ND17 or on the Pitkin osplet that is in care. That chick might have passed – no one likes to give bad news. Fingers crossedd for Little Bit getting some assistance if he is not more mobile and has not been seen eating. There is no way that he can make it up to a crumbling nest 60 feet high – if he does, I will make a big donation to our local wildlife rehabber! Which reminds me. Tomorrow I will be spending the day at the wildlife clinic with the raptors if the weather is good. Hope to get some good images for all of you of our local ambassadors.

Thank you so much for joining me. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures, their images or their videos: ND-LEEF, NADC-AEF, GROWLS and Lady Hawk, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, SF Ospreys and Golden Gate Audubon, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Latvian Fund for Nature, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, LRWT, Cornell Condor Cam, Mispillion Harbour Ospreys, the DDNR, and ‘H’, Cal Falcons, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery, and the Woodland Trust, Glacier Gardens, and Suzanne Arnold Horning.

More sadness in Osprey Land and is L3 injured?

22-23 June 2022

As you know, I have been working on a list of all the feathered friends we have lost so far. I had hoped to have it tidied up last week but, the continuing loss of nestlings has, as I mentioned one day, gutted me. The one word that continues to haunt me is INTRUDERS. At the Cowlitz PUD, we lost 3 healthy osplets to a Bald Eagle predation. At the Cape Henlopen Nest, we lost 3 osplets to starvation because intruders had (most likely) killed the male and injured the female. Two Osplets drowned when their nest platform collapsed at the Patuxent River Park. Two died at Kielder 5A – one caught in the nest and the other from being unwell. One was starved and killed at Loch of the Lowes because Louis had to keep intruders away and could not fish. One died at Llyn Brenig from not being able to get to the fish while another got its leg caught in the nest and die at Loch Arkaig. That was within 7-10 days and those are just the ones I can remember in that period – all Ospreys. (My list includes other species but this count is just ospreys). Thirteen wee osplets lost.

Now there are another two. A freakish accident. It was very hot in the Roaring Fork Valley in Colorado today. The female had covered her two healthy osplets who were really getting their juvenile feathers. There was an intruder. The nesting material got caught in the mother’s talons when she flew after the intruder. As a result she knocked her two babies off the nest. They were more than half way to fledging. A search party has gone out to see if they survived. I am not hopeful. It is a long fall. If they do not survive, then there are now 15 osplets lost in just about a week.

The female at the Pitkin County Osprey nest protects her two osplets from the hot sun while also protecting them and keeping her eyes on the intruder.

Just look at how beautiful and big those two are. They are quite healthy and their juvenile feathers are coming in all over.

Mum is panting and is very hot. She keeps an eye out for the intruder that is flying about the nest.

Mum flies off the nest taking the nesting material and her two chicks with her. They fall to the ground.

Mum returns and is looking. Where are my chicks?

This is the announcement re Pitkin County. The fishing line was not visible—how sad. We could have lost Mama, too. This is perhaps a reason that all Osprey platforms should be carefully cleaned and inspected during non-breeding time. I do not know if it would have saved the one chick – and we will see the status of the injured one later – but fishing line and any human debris in a nest should be removed!

Three of Big Red and Arthur’s fledglings are on top of the Rice Building waiting for a prey drop from Mum and Dad. Meanwhile, one of their siblings – believed to be L3 – is in the rehab clinic. There was a report of a downed Red-tail and Suzanne Horning and Woody responded immediately. — Big shout out to this couple that love the hawks and work at Cornell for their help. No blood and the wings folded nicely so nothing broken. No sign of a collision. I will include any updates this evening. Send positive wishes.

Richmond and Rosie’s osplets are about the same age as the two at the Pitkin County nest. This is a look at week 5 of their lives. These videos captured and edited by SF Ospreys are a super introduction or a reminder of the various stages of the osplets lives.

Early morning at the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest and everyone at Delaware Bay seems to be alright. This is a nest that needs to be cleaned after the season – and monitored re harmful items like monofilament line. It is a good thing that Mum realized that the pretty yellow metal grid could be dangerous and she removed it before it could harm her chicks. There should be an understanding that all human items are removed by qualified wildlife rehabbers from the nests until a certain age of chicks when it might harm them more if they bolted from the nest. I don’t know if it would have saved those babies at the Pitkin Nest. Did anyone know there was fishing line there?

At the ND-LEEF Bald Eagle nest, Little Bit is really enjoying having a lot of the deliveries to himself now that both 15 and 16 have fledged. At 18:20 Mum flew in with a really nice fish. She goes about feeding Little Bit 17.

Mum has landed and Little Bit – the only eaglet on the nest – is mantling it.

Little Bit ate every bite of that fish!

Dad brought a second fish on the nest at 19:13:57. It was a big sucker. The parents were trying to lure 15 into the nest to eat – and it worked like a charm.

ND15, Little Bit’s buddy on the nest, has been eating and eating. He was really hungry. Flying does use up a lot of energy! Little Bit is just taking it all in.

15 could not eat all of its fish. Little Bit 17 must be full to the bald patches on his head because he is not interested in that lovely fish tail at all. Maybe he will want a snack later?

That fish tail is still there – not quite two hours later. My goodness Little Bit. It looks like Little Bit will sleep alone on the nest. 15 has already gone to his perch on the high branches and while we don’t know where 16 is – the parents surely do and have probably taken a prey drop to her.

It looks like ND17 Little Bit finished up the remaining fish and its tail from last evening show above. He came out of the porch in the early morning, around 06:08 with a very nice crop. I cannot see that any further prey items have been brought yet – it is 09:50 nest time now.

The earlier issues with intruders and lack of prey delivery to the Loch of the Lowes nest seem to have dissolved – thankfully. All is well there today.

A quick check on the Dyfi nest of Idris and Telyn. Idris brought in another huge fish today along with all the others. I am thinking he has entered some Welsh Osprey Fishing Derby! Three chicks will be ringed next week. If you haven’t gone to the Dyfi streaming cam and put in a guess for the gender of the chicks, please do. Have some fun and give Ken Gregory that is running the contest a shock with so many entries! You simply chose B for boy and G for girl. There are three of them from the oldest to youngest.

It is expected that the chicks of Mrs G and Aran at the Glaslyn nest in Wales will be ringed at the end of next week. Everything is fine on that nest – how grand.

There are three tiny osplets on the Boathouse on Hog Island, Maine. Dory is a first time Mum and Skiff is the male. The three chicks are Schooner, Slipjack, and Sloop.

Please be advised that the three chicks are so wee and Dory is figuring out how to feed them. We have to be patient and we will see if the third hatch survives. Fingers crossed. It looks like a fantastic spot for a nest! Here is the link to their camera:

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. I will be out of pocket for most of the day today – and again tomorrow – but I will send a late report on the nests we are watching. Take care everyone. Stay safe out there!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages, videos, etc where I got my screen captures: Pitkin County Ospreys, Cornell Bird Lab RTH, SF Ospreys, Mispillion Ospreys and the DDNR, ND-LEEF, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Woodland Trust, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Hog Island Ospreys with Audubon and Explore.org

Oh, what a day!

21 June 2022

Within less than a week, we have seen two nest collapses – and I am thinking a third is coming at the Exshaw Osprey Nest in Alberta. The first was catastrophic with nest 2 at Patuxent River Park plummeting into the water. All three gorgeous older osplets were lost. Thankfully, the partial collapse at the ND-LEEF nest today at 15:43:25 did not cause that horrific sadness. ND15 had a forced fledge but he was ready to fly, thankfully, and landed in a neighbouring tree. ND16 went up the branch. ND17 stayed on the nest for some time looking down before officially branching. Both parents came with food – Mum with a raccoon (do they have a stash of these?) and Dad flew in with a salmon shortly after. Little Bit 17 claimed both but 16 took the fish and 17 polished off the entire raccoon. All is well. What was brilliant was the immediate response by staff to get to that nest. Hats off to Lindsay Grossman! and team. They are keeping a close watch on the nest.

Little Bit finished his racoon. He must be stuffed.

ND16 has come down to join Little Bit on the nest. Little Bit 17 flaps his wings. Maybe he will go up on the branch. His friend was ND15 – I hope he returns to the nest.

A couple of years ago when an on screen incident happened at a nest, it became readily apparent that there must be an emergency contact number under these streaming cams if there is NOT a 24/7 chat with a moderator that has that number. Things happen.

This morning the female at Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest brought in a matching decorating item for the nest. She obviously loves a particular shade of yellow and she must have read that monochromatic furnishings are in style! All kidding aside, the yellow mesh wire is dangerous for the two osplets – as well as the parents. They can get their feet caught. ‘H’ contacted the Centre with a number I provided and they know about the mesh but do not want to interfere. This, sadly, is the type of interference that is needed – it is like having fishing line in a nest. It is human caused. We need to hope that it all works out.

If you watch particular nests all the time, I urge you to find out the emergency number for the nest. USFWS offices will not help. If you cannot find a number below the information but there is a name of an organization, find their phone number. Also get out Google Maps and find the number of the nearest Wildlife Rehabber.

Last year when the chick went over the nest at Patuxent, people called the office of the park but they had closed. We left messages. We talked to Maryland’s USFWS – that is when I found out they will not necessarily do a thing. So find an alternative. Ask on line. Get clever. They don’t want all of us phoning them when a chick sneezes and this is why numbers aren’t posted. But the birds need immediate help -. Be a detective! And incidents most often happen after hours or on holidays. Seriously.

This nest should put a smile on everyone’s face. Telyn sees Idris – that fish is large enough to feed the family for a week. People in the centre saw Idris circling with it. What a guy. Great provider.

Been watching the nest but not put a guess on the chat about the gender of the three. You have a few more days. Dyfi is thrilled with the interest – it is a bit of fun. Here is the link to the nest!

Ferris Akel had a tour of the Cornell Campus this evening just to check on where the Ls were and see Big Red and Arthur. Ferris does a great job in finding the fledglings and I am terribly grateful that he is spending some of his evenings on the Cornell Campus so that we can see the babies. Here are some images for this evening’s tour. Enjoy. If you want to subscribe to Ferris’s tours, go to You Tube and search Ferris Akel’s tours and subscribe. If you have trouble, let me know.

Ferris found all of the fledglings and we got to say good night to Big Red and Arthur who are finished hunting and are going to rest for the night. Big Red was doing a lot of preening. She moults during the summer and in a week or so will be Big Blond – not Big Red! Enjoy the images.

Thank you for joining me this evening. Lots of nests did not get covered. So occupied with ND17 Little Bit. He is fine. He will get up on the branch if he needs to get off the nest. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: ND-LEEF, Dyfi Osprey Project, Mispillion Habour Osprey Cam and the DDNR, and Ferris Akel Tours.

Friday morning in Bird World

17 June 2022

The Cowlitz PUD nest losing all of its chicks just like the Cape Henlopen State Park Osprey nest is ‘catastrophic’. A reader ‘C’ wrote to me and said ‘not tragic but catastrophic’. I agree totally.

One reader wrote and thanked me for covering these events. You are all welcome. But, like you, I feel gutted and especially so with so many birds from this generation being lost in just a few weeks. It is numbing,.

We are left with adults grieving. Electra has a fish on her nest wanting to feed her babies and appearing in shock – not knowing what happened to them and where they are.

A discussion with Alan Poole and Poole Harbour about ospreys – New England population, mid-Atlantic Chesapeake Bay, and Florida Ospreys. I know that all of you will be interested when he compares the US birds with the UK Ospreys. It will be available for one month archived on YouTube.

There are some great images and if you want to learn about Ospreys – or be reminded about all things that are magnificent about our beautiful birds – you should watch this even if you have to do it in shifts. Very informative.

Just a note: Both males and females bring twigs to build the nest! I am thinking of Rosie at the SF Osprey Bay nest. She worked tirelessly helping Richmond rebuilt that destroyed nest – to human surprise they did it quickly!

Did you know that 20% of the world’s population of Ospreys live in Chesapeake Bay? There are 10,000 pairs on the channel markers in the water. Indeed, nests above water are quite safe for Ospreys (except for Bald Eagles and GHOW, if around). Did you know that fresh water fish is more nutritious than the salt fish? Do have a listen to Poole’s talk!

The Bald Eagle raising the hawklet in its nest on Gabriola Island has caught the interest of the world. Christian Sasse and David Hancock are at the nest site and are just giddy. It is considered a rare event and now twice in 5 years they have been able to witness an eagle family raising a hawklet. The first was Sydney in 2017. So here is the archived talk from yesterday and they will be live today, also. What a lucky little hawklet.

Things look better at the Loch of the Lowes. Both of the Osplets have big crops and it looks like Blue NC0 has had some fish, too. I sure hope so. Whatever was the issue at this nest with Laddie delivering food – weather, intruders, or an old eye problem or injury to the male – appears today, at least, to not be a problem. Fabulous.

The nest that is continuing to have weather difficulties is Loch Arkaig. If you check the local weather you will think that the nest should be fine but Loch Arkaig is its own microclimate and it can be terribly different from other areas close by. My heart goes out to Dorcha and Louis who have already lost their Little Bob. Louis – despite it all – gets the fish on the nest regardless. It is evening at Loch Arkaig. There are strong winds but no rain. Thankfully. Louis has brought the tea time meal for the kids. They are in the Reptilian Phase with those oily heads and beautiful coppery feathers at the back along the neck down to the shoulders. Send positive thoughts that we have two nestlings that are going to fledge here! Chase that bad weather away.

Aran brought in a lovely Sea Bass for Mrs G and the kids. He had the head for his tea – Sea Bass always welcome at the nests! Along with trout. All three Bobs at Glaslyn are fine. That is Little Bob coming up at the end getting a private feeding. Well done, Mrs G.

It looks like Idris might have brought in a trout to Telyn to feed their three Bobs at Dyfi. Again, another very happy nest.

Did you know that Telyn is the daughter of Rutland’s Maya and Green 5R (Maya’s partner before Blue 33 ousted him)? Both are fantastic females who really care for those chicks and have bonded with males that are inspirational providers.

I am becoming ever more interested in the way in which genetics plays out in the behaviour of Ospreys. The link between these two Super Moms, thus, becomes more compelling.

Dr Madis Levitis are moving the three Black Storklets to a forest nest and out of the clinic. They are doing exceptional and we have a huge thanks to this team who are working so hard to raise these three.

The smallest storklet is now standing like the older two. Great progress in its development.

The storklets hatched on the 22nd of May. They will be four weeks old on the 19th of June. You will no longer be able to see them in this clinic setting as they have been moved to an artificial nest in the forest where they will continue to be fed and can begin to climatize to the world where they will fledge in August and then make that very long trip to Africa on their first migration. This is a wonderful ending now – and we will check to see if a camera is installed in the forest so that we can watch their continued progress. Thank you Dr Leivits and staff!

Eyes are watching several nests today. One of those is Big Red and Arthur’s Redtail Hawk nest at Cornell where L4, the youngest, is ready to fledge.

Three are on the nest at 1300. It is L1 in the nest bowl, then L3, and L4. L1 is really prey calling! So loud. No fledge from L4 and I understand that there could be bad weather again so maybe they will stay on the nest.

L4 wants to go! It is windy and he is really feisty.

Star sits in the Redding Bald Eagle nest tree thinking about fledging.

Star sure is a beautiful eaglet.

L4 really wants to fly and I am going to watch him with my lunch. ND-LEEF Little Bit 17 waiting for food along with the others. He ate well yesterday so not worried.

You can watch, too!

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/red-tailed-hawks/

Take care everyone. Thank you for joining me this morning. See you soon!

Thank you to: Cornell RTH Cam, Friends of Redding Eagles, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery and the Woodland Trust, Eagle Club of Estonia, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Dfyi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and Scottish Wildlife Trust, and Cowlitz PUD.

Thursday in Bird World

16 June 2022

Wednesday came with some surprises – each of them involving a Bald Eagle. A Bald Eagle visited the Cape Henlopen State Park Osprey Nest for starters.

The way the eagle looked over and down at the nest it appeared that it understood ‘something’ had happened. The eagle did not stay long but it was a surprise to many seeing it on the Osprey nest.

Of course, the second incident with a Bald Eagle was the predation of one of the three osplets at the Cowlitz PUD nest by an eagle. Compared to former years this nest was doing really, really well this year. I believed that the youngest was to the right of Mum when she was feeding with the Middle to the left and Big behind. I have seen mention that it was the youngest taken elsewhere so it is unclear if it was Little or Middle Bob. Regardless this is very sad, indeed.

One reader ‘L’ wondered if the Bald Eagle might have been after the fish that Mum brought to the nest and was feeding the chicks.

The third is the ongoing raising of the hawklet by the Eagle family on Gabriola Island just off the coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. That is one very lucky little hawklet. It arrived on the nest on 4 June as a prey item and by that evening was being cared for and brooded by the female eagle. It looks like it is going to be a good outcome just like the Sydney nest in 2017!

GROWLS just got the funds for the streaming cam last year – and what an interesting first year it has turned out to be.

The hawklet is flapping its wings – the eaglet has also fed the hawklet so it has been fully adopted into the family. In an online discussion yesterday, Christian Sasse does not believe that the hawklet’s life is in any danger because there is plenty of food for the eagles in the area.

@GROWLS

Ferris Akel had a wonderful tour of the Cornell campus last night. It was purposefully to see Big Red, Arthur and the four hawks. He found every one of them! It is nice to be able to share some images with you.

I believe this to be L1. She was the only fledgling not on the nest but was out hunting – or sitting and watching from a lovely pine. Isn’t she gorgeous? A mini-Big Red with that amazing necklace.

Arthur was moving about. He had been with Big Red on the Bradfield Building (where they sleep on the ledge) and then moved to one of the light stands. Both parents were actively watching the Ls from a distance.

Of course, not all of the family cooperated with the lighting situation for the camera!

L4 was a sleepy baby. He kept nodding off. What a little cutie. I will never ever forget this wee babe clamouring over its big siblings to get right up front to eat. L4 was fearless!

L4 has not fledged. L2 just flew onto the nest joining L4. It seems that everyone is encouraging L4 to fledge today! We will see. It has been rainy and mention of a storm system moving in makes me want L4 to stay put. 🙂

What is with the Ls loving to run up and down the rails? This is L4 last evening around 19:30.

Like L4 at Cornell, Sky is the only eaglet not to have fledged at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta. Here he is doing a great job of hovering. Will they both fledge today?

Harriet (E1) at the MN-DNR nest of Nancy (and Harry) is now branching.

It is hard to see little Love and Peace in the Glacier Gardens nest of Liberty and Freedom. They are both still there and they are both fuzzy – sweet. Mum has a dirty beak from aerating that nest!

Osplets watching Idris as he takes off after delivering a fish to Telyn for their lunch.

Have you noticed that some of the Ospreys are leaving the greenery growing in the nests this year? It is thought to help against predation (supposedly). The lovely Mrs G and her three osplets at the Glaslyn nest – they have quite a bit of grass growing around the sides of the nest cup.

Dylan loves Brown Trout. Today at 12:12 he delivered a whole on to Seren and the three Bobs at the Llyn Clywedog nest. He didn’t even take a single bite! Oh, the family is going to love that fish.

Poor Dorcha. The wind and rain only let up for awhile it seens at the Loch Arkaig nest in Scotland. Thankfully Louis is a good fisher. The surviving two Bobs are doing well it would appear despite the cold and wet.

There has been continuing concern over the Loch of the Lowes Osprey nest of Laddie LM12 and Blue NC0. Laddie has only been bringing in twiddlers – tiny snack fish. The question was – what is going on? Some felt that Laddie had another eye injury. At any rate, we can take a breath for the moment. He brought in a substantial fish and the chicks and Mum got to eat. Well done Laddie.

Three gorgeous osplets at the Foulshaw Moss nest of White YW and Blue 35 are growing and getting those beautiful juvenile feathers. All three are almost identical in size, too!

Blue 33 is a great provider. He arrived at the nest and there was already a fish there that Maya was feeding the trio – so he had a nice lunch himself. Well deserved for sure! I have never gone to sleep at night worrying about this nest.

It looks like the two wee surviving Bobs at the Llyn Brenig nest are doing alright. Positive energy for continuing growth and success for Mr and Mrs AX6 and family.

Both up at the front of the nest looking off to the world beyond.

Wow! One of the Bobs at the Poole Harbour nest of CJ7 and Blue 22 has grown enough for us to see it!!!!!!!!! Yes.

So far, the food deliveries at the ND-LEEF Bald Eagle nest have alluded Little Bit 17. I am hoping – beyond hope – that prey arrives at the nest and our third hatch gets some food. Send positive wishes please.

The three storklets in the care of Dr Madis Leivits in Estonia are doing great. While everyone would prefer that they could have been raised successfully in the wild by a single parent, it was not possible. The three surviving storklets continue to thrive at the Vet College. Mum has been put back in place and the wee ones can sense when fish are coming! Have a look.

And here is their lunch today!

Here is their latest feeding – a few hours after lunch.

The two Eastern Imperial Eaglets ate side by side – . Fantastic. I always worry about the Golden Eagles and the Imperial ones because of siblicide. Both of these chicks look good. The feeding is quite pleasant.

Bernd-Ulrich Meyburg wrote a paper titled, “Sibling aggression and mortality amongst nesting eagles” in 2008. In that paper he states, “In certain eagle species it is not the availability of food that effects the chances of survival but the interval between hatching. If the interval between hatching is short, the second chick can develop normally and fledge.” The two below are closer in size and it is hoped that they will both thrive and fledge.

We are two days into fledge watch at the scrape of Annie and Alden in The Campanile on the campus of UCalifornia-Berkeley. Cal Falcons have provided another great growth chart on their FB page.

We continue to have some fledge watches at various nests and lots of wishes for prey items to land on the ND-LEEF nest.

Take care everyone. Thank you so much for joining me today. See you tomorrow.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams, videos, and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Liz M, Cape Henlopen State Park Ospreys, GROWLS, Ferris Akel Tours, Cornell Bird Lab RTH, Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, MN-DNR, Glacier Gardens, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, CarnyXWild, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lotttery, and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Woodland Trust, Cumbrian Wildlife Trust, LRWT, Llyn Brenig, Edith P, Eagle Club of Estonia, and Cal Falcons.

Little Bit ND17 is still the ‘King of the Snatch and Grab’ and other news in Bird World

15 June 2022

We needed some good news in Bird World after Big Bob plummeted Little Bob at the Loch of the Lowes to death earlier this morning. That nest, by the way, is not any happier. Laddie brought in what looked like a minnow. Blue NC0 and both chicks will be quite hungry. I wonder what is up?

But, never mind! At the ND-LEEF nest there were two fish brought in before 10:00. The first was a Sucker delivered by Mum and the second was a Blue Gill brought in by Dad.

At 05:53:51, the sucker arrives. Little Bit 17 gets it first. What did I tell you. Then he loses it. Then he steals it again — twice!

At 09:45:53 Dad brings in the Blue Gill. ND15 gets it. At 10:01:03, Little Bit 17 steals it. Boy is this kid good. He grabs it, does the most amazing turn around and runs to the porch to eat it!!!!!! Wow. Is happiness spelled fish???????? It is cooler – 78F. Yesterday it was 96 F at the nest. Let us hope more fish arrive if it is to be ultra hot later.

The sucker arrives at 05:53:51. Little Bit will get it first, lose it and steal it again twice!

Little Bit 17 is very clever. He has had to be to survive on this nest with two much larger siblings and often, little prey. His head shows that he has also paid for trying to steal food to live. So, he sits and watches 15. 15 is not hostile to Little Bit like 16 is.

Little Bit watches and listens and plans its attack.

When he sees the right opportunity – meaning he can see that he can grab the prey and get out – he goes for it. He grabs. Turns back to the right like a ballet dancer doing a pirouette. Then he moves quickly to his safe spot – the porch.

ND15 raises its wing. Little Bit 17 has the rest of the fish and is getting to the porch. What is really incredible is we are talking about an event that only took seconds.

This is thought to be ND16’s first branching – at 10:06. We don’t know what happened when the camera was off. This is good. 15 has already branched and maybe 16 will be more concerned with flying than with Little Bit.

The temperature has now jumped and it is hot. Thankfully – due to his great stealing skills – Little Bit 17 has had some food and hydration.

It is week 4 at the Osprey nest of Richmond and Rosie on the Whirley Crane. San Francisco Ospreys posted their weekly update video of the family. Do we have names for these? Not yet, in a few days. Should I mention that there is no problem with fish delivery at this nest?

Congratulations to Pittsburgh Hayes 18 who fledged this morning at around 11:17. (or is it a fludge?). Upper left branch – lots of leaves and flies off from there! Well done.

We are into day 2 of fledge watch at Cal Falcons. It is hard to believe that Grinnell Jr and Lindsay are really ready to fly!

They can look through the openings to see the world outside that will soon be theirs.

L4 was on the nest with L3 this morning. Beautiful little hawks of Big Red and Arthur. There is a storm coming in on Thursday so fingers crossed that L4 decides not to fledge! What a cutie pie.

The storklets of Jan and Janika had a good feed not that long ago. They are doing extremely well. The staff and all those involved must be terribly happy so far.

We now know that Betty at the Mlade Buky White Stork nest eliminated the youngest chick, the 5th, a couple of days ago. Now Kaia, the mate of Karl II, has tried to eliminate one of the storklets. They are all big! Everything is currently normal on this nest. Kaia might perceive that there is not enough food. She does not know that Karl II has been bringing in lots and lots of food. Let us hope that all stays normal with all the chicks! Send positive wishes.

Today there will be an on line presentation and Q & A about the Bald Eagles on Gabriola Island in British Columbia that have adopted the Red tail hawklet. It was brought in as prey on 4 June and is currently being fed and cared for by the eagles as if it is their own.

Go to this YouTube site to set the reminder if you wish to be part of this discussion. I cannot tell you the time in your zone as YT automatically sets the time remaining to my specific zone which is 15:00 CDT.

There is super news coming from the Glaslyn nest of Aran and Mrs G. Aran fed his three chicks of 2022 for the first time today.

It was pitching down rain at Loch Arkaig. Poor Dorcha and the two surviving chicks. Louis was able to bring in a fish as things began to clear. Please keep this nest in your thoughts.

Seren and Dylan on the perch together with the three Bobs in the nest below. What a gorgeous family portrait and what a beautiful site in Wales for an Osprey nest. All is well here.

Telyn and Idris have been keeping intruders away from the nest. Gosh these returning two year olds can be a nuisance that can also cause harm to a nest. Reminds me of the juveniles returning to Taiaroa Head when the chicks are on the nests alone and they dance and sky call and pick on the little ones.

There has been the osprey in the image below briefly visiting the Cape Henlopen Osprey nest. I cannot identify it other than it does not appear to be the Mum because her necklace was very faint. I could not see the feathering to tell if it was the intruder female that removed all of the osplets.

Spirit spent the night with Jackie at the Big Bear Valley nest in California. How reassuring is it to see these beautiful fledglings return home – safe and sound?

I really wanted to give you the good news about ND17 so I am posting much earlier than planned. While 17 didn’t get a whole fish – and it is getting hot – he did get food and he is definitely not lethargic like the Loch of the Lowes osplet.

It is the first sunny day we have had and rain is to come again at 1800. My plan is to be outside in the garden listening to the birds! Thank you so much for being with me today. I will be posting again on Thursday morning. Take care all.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Pix Cams, ND-LEEF, Cal Falcons, Cornell Bird RTH, Friends of Big Bear Valley, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery, and the Woodland Trust, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, SF Bay Ospreys, Cape Henlopen State Park Ospreys, Dyfi Osprey Project, CarnyXWild, GROWLS, and the Eagle Club of Estonia.

Late Sunday and early Monday in Bird World

12 June 2022

UPDATE: The smallest, the 5th hatch storklet, at the Mlade Buky nest of Betty and Bukacek was eliminated on Sunday. I had missed this.

It looks like it could be another rainy day on the Canadian Prairies. We are certainly making up with moisture this spring for 4-5 years of drought. Everything is green and beautiful.

Well, the weather is taking its toll on other nests in Scotland and Wales on Sunday. Those long, cold rainy days with a dip in fish deliveries are making some of the Bobs cranky – and aggressive. Big Bob on the Loch of the Lowes almost pushed both Middle and Little Bobs off the nest. Little Bob has also missed out on some meals. I sure hope this weather changes and these chicks settle down.

At tea time on Monday, Telyn went out of her way – finally – to make sure that Little Bob had fish. I was terribly happy to see this as the biggest Bob is working hard to exclude Little.

Idris and Telyn at the Dyfi nest made sure that all three of the Bobs were fed well before bedtime on Sunday. It has been a stinker of weather over in Wales, too.

Monday’s tea at Dyfi was a Sea Bass followed by the delivery of a mullet by Idris to Telyn and the kids. The weather had considerably improved.

My goodness. Aran caught one of his whoppers! He cleaned off the head before delivering it to Mrs G and the kids.

Mrs G fed herself and the kids. Big Bob is in food coma and Little and Middle are up at the table.

There was lots of fish left over when Mrs G finished so Aran decided to have a really good meal before he got on the perch. All appears to be good.

The wind is still blowing a bit on the Glaslyn nest at tea time. All of the chicks are wide awake. Look at how good Little Bob is doing. He is standing at the back.

We have learned that a good nest can change in the blink of an eye – or weather, intruders, lack of prey. So far the osplets on the nest of Blue 33 (11) and Maya are doing fantastic. They are now all at least five weeks old and they will be ringed soon. Ringing normally takes place between 35-43 days in the UK. Any later and the osplets could bolt and any earlier and the leg would still be growing.

The weather has improved at Loch Arkaig – thankfully. Louis has brought fish in and has covered up Little Bob with some sticks brought in and from the nest. The surviving two Bobs appear to be fine this morning. They benefited from being under Dorcha during the cold rain and winds.

The rain appears to have stopped at the Llyn Clywedog nest of Dylan and Seren. Dylan is on the nest and in the early afternoon there was a male intruder with a blue Darvic ring that was flying around the nest. He was quickly sent off.

The three storklets continue to thrive in the care of the Veterinary School. Forest sounds have been added to their environment.

A very good article has been translated and placed on Looduskalender with the Forum for the Black Stork nest of Karl II and Kaia. The information could be applied universally to nests that depend on fish for their main food item. The specific nest that they are talking about is, however, that of Karl II and Kaia in the Karula National Forest.

Black Stork – Ciconia nigra

The older chicks hatched on 28 May and turned two weeks old today. The third chick is considerably smaller but hatched three days later than the older two.
Mother Kaia and father Karl are managing to feed their chicks well, despite the youngest being significantly smaller than the others. We know and have observed that Black Storks sometimes carry out infanticide, i.e. the parent birds remove the weakest chick from the nest. The main reason for this is a lack of food. Chicks must be very well fed because they will embark on a long and dangerous migration in August on their own, but this is how black storks do it. Less than a third of this year’s chicks will be alive in a year.
What are we not seeing on the webcam?
In Karula National Park, where this black storks nest is located, Kotkaklubi has been organising clean-up campaigns for many years to clear the banks of the brooks of the Koiva river basin of undergrowth so that the birds can access them. Small natural streams quickly become overgrown with vegetation, but black storks are happy to feed in such remote places. Adult birds will also look for food in ditches where fish can be found during the breeding season. Still, these ditches may dry up during both spring and summer droughts, threatening breeding success. Therefore the birds need to be able to visit different feeding areas. Adult BS also forage in meadows, catching frogs and occasionally rodents. We can see on the webcam that fish is their primary food.
In addition, Urmas Sellis has installed a fish basket with live fish in a stream about ten kilometres away from the nest, and a trail camera has recorded the visits of black storks there.

Today, 13 June, the chicks are respectively 16, 16 and 13 days old.

The three storklets of Karl II and Kaia are waking up to a whole new day!

PLEASE NOTE THAT ON SUNDAY, BETTY ELIMINATED THE 5TH STORKLET. It looks like another rainy mucky day for Bukacek and Betty and their five little white storklets in Mlade Buky. I cannot look at the adult standing there without thinking about the plastic decoy with the storklets of Jan and Janika. Looks just like that decoy!

The storklets are getting their juvenile feathers.

A prey item has been brought to the ND-LEEF nest at 08:36:54. ND 15 stole it from ND16 and at 08:57:49 Little Bit 17 steals it, eats some, and then 16 gets it. They are all hungry but Little Bit is right in there!

Little Bit 17 is still ‘the king of the snatch and grab’. Fingers crossed for a lot more prey today!

It is extremely sad to see the Cape Henlopen nest with the three dead osplets of the long bonded pair on an empty nest. It remains unclear what happened to the 20 year old Dad and Mum from the nest after the intruders took over late Friday. An entire family lost because of intruders? So sad.

Will the intruders return? We wait.

Both fledglings were on the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest this morning. Middle had control of the fish delivery. The parents have been excellent at bringing the two lots of fish during the day. They look to be in great health and their flying skills – and landing – are improving every day.

At 08:41 all four of Big Red and Arthur’s hawklets were on the nest. L2 fledged first followed by L1. L3 spent Sunday up on a higher level of the tower but it has yet to fledge along with the youngest L4.

L3 is 49 days old today and L4 is 46. The average of fledge at Big Red’s nest is 46.5 days. We could be looking at another two flying today or tomorrow.

Takoda is 69 days old today. On Sunday he had branched up to the height where Mr President normally perches. Early this morning he made it up to the cam which made for some lovely closeups just for us! Fledging is close at hand.

All eyes are on Star at the Redding Eagle nest. She is branching farther up and this early morning seems to have put out the sound on the streaming cam. As far as I know, there has been no sighting of Sentry since he fledged.

Could this be your day to fly Star?

Spirit is so beautiful. She is 3 months and 9 days old today. She hatched on 3 March and fledged on 31 May. She came down to visit the nest before taking off into the Big Bear Valley at 06:13. She might have been looking for breakfast!

There is one more fledge to go at the Pittsburgh-Hayes Bald Eagles nest and that is H18. Both H16 and H17 fledged on the 10th of June within an hour and a half of one another (06:20 and 07:50). That third fledge could happen any time.

Both eaglets at the US Steel nest are considering branching! What a gorgeous view.

Ahote and Kana’kini were on the move this morning. What a beautiful camera view of both of them. Sky is still on the natal nest. The time is o7:03.

An early morning view of the San Jose City Hall Peregrine falcons.

At 03:58 Annie was sleeping in the scrape with Lindsay and Grinnell Jr. Precious moments. Fledge will come before we know it. Goodness. Wasn’t it just yesterday that Alden came into our lives???? It sure seems like it. Annie and Alden have been super parents and I am thrilled that these two chicks got a chance to make their own way in the world. It could have been dramatically different without Alden.

Fledge watch begins for Lindsay and Grinnell Jr tomorrow – 14 June!!!!!!

It is early morning on the Canadian Prairies. We have had so much rain that the landscape could be the green of Ireland! It is impossible to see the birds and squirrels and even the small bunny in the jungle that has grown. Birds can be seen flying in and out and the feeders are empty by noon so they are in there – just covered by all the branches and leaves.

There may be several fledges today. There are eyes on many, many nests!

I hope that your Monday is a good start to the week. Thank you for joining me. Take care!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or websites where I took my screen captures: Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Woodland Trust, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, LRWT, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery and Scottish Wildlife Trust, CarnyXWild, Eagle Club of Estonia, LizM, Mlade Buky, ND-LEEF, Cape Henlopen State Park Ospreys Cam, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Cornell Bird Lab RTH, NADE-AEF, Friends of Redding Eagles, Pix Cams, FOBBV, Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, San Jose City Falcons, and Cal Falcons.

Late Thursday in Bird World

9 June 2022

So many fledge watches! How many of us wish we could fly about like the birds?

L1 and L2 have both returned to their natal nest on the Fernow light stand on the Cornell Campus. Big Red and Arthur have been bringing prey. Today when L2 flew back and wanted to take L3 and L4’s lunch, Big Red went and got it and fed the two smallest chicks. It was interesting. Someone asked if they return to the nest and the answer is ‘yes’ for the first several weeks you might catch them but once they fledge Big Red really does like to feed the fledglings ‘off nest’. She has been known to ‘get upset’ with Arthur for feeding the wee babes on the nest!

At 17:20 with all four on the nest, Big Red returns with another chipmunk for dinner.

They are on fledge watch at Utica scrape as falcons Percy and Kara are spending time on the ledge! Little Ares is grateful – they are focused on flying and he gets a great meal!

The Glaslyn osplets are thinking about food – not fledging – as they gobble down the fish that Aran brought to the nest for Mrs G to feed them!

Blue NC0 and the three are really benefiting from Laddie’s fishing lately at the Loch of the Lowes. He brought in 9 fish on the 7th! How wonderful!

Despite Idris being a remarkable fisher, that Big Bob is nothing but a handful. Emyr Evans describes it as ‘play aggression’ when the are beaking one another. It is true. Ospreys in the UK rarely die from siblicide – unlike their counterparts in the US where we have seen a number of cases in the large raptors this year. Normally Telyn gets it all sorted and all are fed.

Little Bit has been really good at the snatch and grab at the ND-LEEF nest. A raccoon came to the nest and it has been going back and forth switching from one sibling to the other. At 13:54 Little Bit 17 stole it from the beaking sibling 16 and he was working on it again later after 16 took it back. Little Bit has had a very large crop today so it is another good day for this hard working eaglet who doesn’t seem to be afraid and who is ever so quick!

Little Bit 17 is growing. Just look at the span of the wings and the tail feathers.

There has been a lot of speculation on the chat at the ND-LEEF nest that because Little Bit is a small male – is that true? – we don’t know – that it would not be able to find a mate. Perhaps we should step back from that statement. We do not know what happens to any unmonitored raptor. We can only hope that they survive their first year. Little Bit has some advantages – being small and quick is one of them. Reading the environment well is another. Willing to eat anything to survive is another but his quickness and his ability to manoeuvre will be key.

It has been miserable and rainy in Mlade Buky, The Czech Republic. Still Bukacek and Betty are feeding their wee storklets.

Both Lady and Dad spent the night at the WBSE nest in the old Ironbark tree in the Sydney Olympic Park. Friday morning Lady is rolling the first egg. Will there be a second? Stay tuned.

At the Redding nest, Sentry is at 15:20 nest time up on a very high branch! Will he fludge or fledge?

Here is the link to the Redding camera if you do not have it:

Both fledglings are back on the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest hoping for a fish delivery!

All three are on the cliff nest of Thunder and Akecheta waiting for some prey drops, too! Sky has been getting ready – hovering and jumping.

So much going on! Most doing very well.

Thank you for joining me as I jumped around and checked on a few of our nests that we have been watching. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and The Institute for Wildlife Studies, Cornell RTH, Mlade Buky, Friends of Redding Eagles, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, ND-LEEF, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and Woodland Trust, and Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn.

Wednesday Morning in Bird World

8 June 2022

It is mornings like this when there is a beautiful blue sky and the sun is pouring down that you wish the birds would just pause but, they don’t! Everything is happening at once!

L2 has fledged at the Cornell Red-tail Hawk nest on the Fernow Light Stand. Big Red and Arthur – congratulations for your first fledge of the 2022 season. The unexpected flight caused many to think it was L1. It wasn’t. However, L2 flew like a pro right over to the Rice Building where later prey was delivered. Well done! L1 will no doubt follow soon!

L1 is over by the fledge ledge. L3 and L4 are ducklings sleeping in the nest.

This is the earliest that Lady has laid her egg on the White-Bellied Sea Eagle (WBSE) nest in the Sydney Olympic Forest. That time was 1737 on 8 June. Dad was on the nest giving Lady support. Congratulations!

There has been a fludge at the Manchester NH Peregrine Falcon scrape. Clem had been flapping her wings and slipped off the edge at 0600:21. She has been located outside the gym at the BS Tower. I wonder if she will be picked up and put back into the nest??

Izzi – the 2020 hatch of Diamond and Xavier at Orange, Australia – was placed back in the scrape by Cilla Kinross, the researcher at Charles Sturt University.

The two Cal Falcons are growing and growing and far too soon they will be fludging or fledging. Here is a short video clip of the morning feeding.

Then a pigeon meal arrives. Check out the size of these chicks as they run to get fed.

The three Black Storklets in the nest of Karl II and Kaia in the Karula National Forest in Estonia are doing great. The third hatch is getting stronger and the parents seem to always make sure that it gets fish! Today it even ate a large one. The 4th egg did not hatch.

Ah, Kaia is so lovely.

All storklets accounted for at the Mlade Buky nest in The Czech Republic of Bukacek and Betty.

Many have wondered (or worried) that fish were not being delivered to the West End nest and that Ahote is hungry. In fact, Thunder and Akecheta delivered 9 fish to the nest yesterday and Ahote had his fill. All of the eaglets are fine. Ahote took another flight and returned to the nest.

At the University of Florida-Gainesville Middle has been taking the prey before Big could get to it! Growing, growing confidence. At least two big fish meals have arrived at the nest before 0830. Middle ate the first one and was more interested in what was happening off the nest when the second arrived and Big took it. Right now, Middle is still on the nest and has not taken its first flight.

Things continue to go well for ND17 at the ND-LEEF Bald Eagle nest. Three fish had been delivered by 1024. Little was stealing bites and then took the fish tail from 15 at 09:43:46 and ate it. The day is starting off wonderfully. Fingers crossed. I really hope that yesterday was a transition and that the parents will make sure Little Bit gets food.

Little Bit looks under the tail of 15.

Then Little Bit moves around 15.

Little Bit – as fast as Lightning (would be a good name for him) steals the fish tail!

As quick as he stole it, he gets back to his safe spot on the porch! Well done Little Bit 17.

The day is going to get busier. It just feels like half a dozen or more birds could fledge. I owe you some image of the ducklings and goslings and will try and get those up later today or tomorrow.

Take care everyone. Thank you so much for joining me this morning. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures – and for the videos they post: Cal Falcons, ND-LEEF, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Mlade Buky White Storks, Eagle Club of Estonia, Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, Cornell RTH, and the Peregrine Networks.