Thursday Morning in Bird World

12 May 2022

It might be grey skies on the Canadian Prairies but it was a golden morning on most of the nests. If I say that, will it change? Oh, let us hope not.

The third egg hatched overnight at the Manton Bay nest of Blue 33 (11) and that wee Bob was up eating with its two big siblings a few hours later. Three Bobs after worrying we had lost one with the fish ordeal yesterday. Three Bobs.

Rutland has reported that the chick that was left exposed yesterday is eating well. This is encouraging. Life is good.

Little Bob’s is eating well for hatching so recently!

With Rutland’s good news, it seemed a good time to check on the two osplets at the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest. It looked like Middle had worked for position again but he was up getting fed on one side of Mum with Big on the other. Of course, Middle has to balance itself on the edge of the nest. Fish is good. It is 25 degrees C, winds are 16 kph, and the pressure is falling.

Sadly, the news is not all good. The Dahlgren Osprey nest of Jack and Harriet lost its second chick. The area has received a lot of rain during hatch and the nest is above water on the creek. I so wish that nest would be cleaned out off season and people would stop leaving toys or remove toys so Jack cannot find them if they go in the bin. Harriet cannot keep the nest orderly and she has even lost eggs in the mess. That camera is off line. The third chick did eat this morning.

There is a pip for Richmond and Rosie!

There is the nest of these two famous Ospreys on top of the old WWII Whirley Crane at the Richmond Shipping Yards in SF Bay.

Here is the link to both of the cams: http://sfbayospreys.org/

It is a gorgeous day for Nancy and Harriet at the MN-DNR nest. The bad weather seems to have left the area and the winds are nice and calm. There is food on the nest. Excellent.

It is hot at the Bald Eagle nest at Decorah North in Iowa. Mrs DNF is trying to be a Mumbrella as best she can. The two eaglets have done well. No indication of any issues like there were at the Denton Homes nest (Avian Flu).

The two eyases at the Cal Falcons scrape both had a nice breakfast at 06:30 nest time. Annie is having a siesta as they sleep off the food coma.

There are still five itchy growing eyases at the Manchester NH scrape. Gosh, the parents of these 5 have to work so hard. It takes so much more food and time. This Mum fed for an hour one day.

The one surviving chick at the Cromer Peregrine scrape in the UK looks good today. Hopefully all is well with this wee one.

Kaia has been aerating the nest in the Karula National Park in Estonia that she shares with her mate, Karl II. It is a beautiful day there. Looking forward to those eggs hatching. These two are great parents.

My friend, ‘S’ in Latvia was so proud last year. Kaia was a new mate. Three eggs hatched and Kaia did not ‘sort’ the chicks. Indeed, that was such a wonderful thing. The small one, the third hatch, Pikne, turned out to be a strong little female almost beating her dad to Africa for the winter migration!

For all the Peregrine Falcon fans, I have a conundrum for you and a posting from our local nest. First up, the puzzle comes from the Field Museum in Chicago. [Thank you to Holly Parsons for posting this because I would have missed it.]

Want to know what happens? Check out the Field Museum FB page.

We have several Peregrin Falcon nests in Manitoba as part of the Peregrine Falcon Recovery Project. One of them is on the Radisson Hotel in downtown Winnipeg. The streaming cam link is in the information from Dennis Swayze below. The juveniles spend a lot of time around our legislative building as they practice their flying and hunting. It is always nice to see them in the summer!

As for me, I am really busy today trying to work outside around yet another bout of torrential rain. I will check in with these and our other nests much later today. I hope everyone has a lovely Thursday wherever you are. Thank you for being with me and please take care.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: The Manitoba Peregrine Recovery Group and Dennis Swayze, Cal Falcons, Cromer Peregrine Falcons, SF Bay Ospreys and Golden Gate Audubon, Peregrine Networks, Field Museum, Eagle Club of Estonia, Explore.org, MN-DNR, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, and LRWT.

Early Tuesday in Bird World

3 May 2022

News has come that the male at Denton Homes, Majestic Dad, has died. Avian Flu has been confirmed. The Denton Homes nest lost three eaglets and an adult male. The female, Majestic Mum, looks good on cam and is being monitored.

For those looking for information, here are two publications that have good solid information as well as some of the latest news on the spread.

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic)?fbclid=IwAR2wNC51JO4V2JADpz_SGHQR_ovyiwyYpVmAVyxsMBt_rGxtzhROMqBSZEM

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/wildbirds.htm?fbclid=IwAR03jx2Iw6YSAPQL9jJ4zvAzT58C9UcEgEAiAycbiOyALsOY1wEsLmjzJbA

This is one of the last images of E2, that sweet little eaglet off the MN-DNR nest that became a victim of siblicide at the age of 5 weeks. E2 hatched on 23 May and was shoved off the nest by E1 and subsequently euthanized on 30 April.

Dr Sharpe has been very busy. Another chick was to be banded on Santa Rosa Island and Dr Sharpe arrived just in time as the nest had collapsed and dropped. Here is that announcement

There are now five baby Peregrine Falcons in the Manchester, New Hampshire nest

Here is the link to that streaming camera (there are 2 of them).

There is an unease this morning on the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest. I have observed fish being brought in but a bewildered adult and no feeding of the eaglets. An adult brought a fish on at 10:19 (or thereabouts). Both of the chicks began to scream for food. It was interesting watching what is happening. The adult eventually gave up and dropped the fish on the nest. Middle began to self-feed. You might have noticed him chewing on other bits of old fish and bones on the nest.

In the image below, the adult has brought in the fish. Middle is trying to get under here to be fed. (Big has the darker back plumage).

Middle anticipated that the adult would be feeding them and is trying to get to a point away from Big so that it gets some food.

The female places the fish in the middle of the nest leaving it. She did not feed the chicks when she brought in the piece of fish.

The chicks look on as the adult flies away. They do not understand what is going on – the same as me!

Middle begins to self-feed.

The chicks give up on the self-feeding. This picture was taken at 10:31.

At 10:47 an adult lands on the nest.

The adult, at first, appears to be a small piece of fish tail that they have brought in. Then the adult pulls part of a catfish – the head and part of the body – out of the nest. Both chicks are prey crying very loud. The adult appears confused as Middle tries to self feed. Is this Dad? and was it Dad earlier?

The adult looks completely bewildered.

Middle is attempting to self-feed. What is going on at this nest?

Middle had very little food yesterday and, if that were the case the day before, is not starving but getting there. It is clear that Big has no crop and is also hungry but not like Middle.

Middle may have gotten a little flesh off the open end.

While the dropping of the fish on the nest is a good strategy for both if there are two pieces and both chicks are self-feeding, it is clear that these two are not ready to feed themselves. Where is the female?

At 12 noon the adult returns, chicks crying desperately for food. The adult looks around. Is this Dad again? (From the behaviour I am assuming Dad). Where is Mum? If you observe the Mum feeding the chicks (or the dad) please send me a note. I cannot watch the nest all day today, unfortunately. I am quite concerned.

This has been posted on the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey Nest page if you would like to help name the chicks, the adults, and the nest:

All I have to do is flip over to the Red-tail Hawk nest at Cornell and there is an instant smile. The four Ls do not have to worry about getting fed. Arthur is constantly bringing in food and Big Red feeds each beak until there is not one asking for food.

Larger clutch, direct feeding, lots of food on the nest, no history of siblicide – that is the difference at the Red-tail Hawk nest as compared with the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest.

The West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta is an example of two parents working hard to make sure that each of their offspring survive —- and thrive! Both parents were active bringing in food. Several times they had tandem feedings. And look – Sky, Ahota, and Kanakini. They should all fledge and we hope return and raise their own families in the Channel Islands.

The Mum and Dad at Pittsburgh-Hayes consistently raise triplets to fledge. They hatched on 21, 22, and 25th of March making them 43, 42, and 39 days old.

These are Bald Eagle nests. Examples of siblicide that I listed yesterday include both Bald Eagles and Ospreys. It will be enlightening, at the end of the season, to compare data on species in terms of survival rates. It is also complicated and might not reveal a true picture in terms of prey availability, parenting, genetic predisposition to siblicide, etc. unfortunately. Another interesting comparison will be the rate of success of 3 clutch Ospreys in the UK with those in North America.

At the Hellgate Canyon nest of Iris in Missoula, Montana, the oldest osprey in the world laid her first egg of the 2022 season at 08:13.

Louis arrived a little later – fishless – to see the egg and do what Louis does.

I want to repost Dr Erick Greene’s letter about Iris’s relationship with Louis and why I should not be – nor you – upset with the fact that he has two nests. There is a huge change in the Osprey population that use the Clark Fork River for their food supply. Much of what Dr Greene says can also be applied to other species who are under pressure.

The Anacapa Falcons are doing well.

Things seem to have settled for now so that Bukachek and Betty can take care of their five eggs in the Mlade Buky White Stork nest in The Czech Republic. They have had disturbances – as recent as two days ago- from intruders like so many other nests this year.

It is a soaking morning on the Bald Eagle nest at Notre Dame University. There has been some strife at the nest with regard to the third hatch getting feed. It seems that there are good days and not so good. The weather might well impact feeding and behaviour today.

This is the history of this nest back to 2015: One chick, ND1 in 2015; ND2 in 2016; ND 3 and 4 in 2017; ND 5 and 6 in 2018, ND 7, 8, and 9 in 2019; ND 10, 11, and chick 12 who died on May 14 in 2020); ND 13 and 14 with a non-viable egg also in 2021. The hatches this year (2022) are ND 15, 16, and 17. Hopefully all three will make it.

Notice the turtle shells. James Broley commented that the Bald Eagles love turtle and he always found turtle shells in their nests when he went to band the chicks.

Beautiful female with her two eggs in the Barlinka Forest nest in Poland.

Wow! I just came across this Osprey nest at the US Steelworks Plant in Washington State.

It really helps to have metal workers when you need an upgrade. The original nest was on top of a light pole. Look carefully. In 2012, when a lighting upgrade was required, it was felt that a new nest platform should be constructed. The workers incorporated the old nest with the new metal one in hopes of attracting the birds to use it.

I do not know anything about the history of this Osprey nest. It is in Kalamana, Washington State and the Pacific Northwest had tremendous problems with the extreme summer heat causing many nests to fail. Chicks were leaping to their death to get away from the heat. So this is a warning if you start to watch this nest – there could be issues related to weather at this nest.

Eyases have hatched at the Cromer Peregrine Falcon scrape in the UK. The adults are Poppy and Henry.

The nest is on top of the Cromer Church Tower. In 2020, the resident pair fledged three chicks. In 2021, no viable eggs were laid. Now look at the little ones this year. Fantastic.

Here is a short video of their feeding. Notice how the female holds the prey.

Here is a link to the Cromer Peregrine Falcon page that has a link to the camera as well as lots of images and information.

https://www.cromerperegrineproject.co.uk/

And here is a link to the YouTube streaming cam for Cromer.

I am very interested in the White-tail Eagle nest at the Matsalu National Park in Estonia. Last year the couple hatched two chicks that perished from Avian Flu. It was the first recognized instance of H5N1 during spring breeding and marked a shift from the Avian Flu being prevalent in the fall and winter when it did not impact the breeding season. The two eagles have returned to the nest where WTE have been raised since the 1870s.

Will they lay eggs this season? If so, they are very, very late. In a normal season the eggs would be laid around the third week in March with hatching in late April. We are now 3 March.

This is the link to this nest in Estonia.

If you are watching the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest today and see a feeding, if you do not mind sending me your observations I would be very grateful and would, of course, credit you for those! I am very worried about this nest. The female has to eat and it is possible that she is as ‘starving’ as Middle. Two fish on a nest is not enough to support the female plus two growing and demanding chicks. Thank you so much!

So many nests and so much happening – lots of good and much sadness recently. Thank you for joining me today. It is so nice having you here. Please take good care.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: The Eagle Club of Estonia, Cromer Peregrine Falcons, U-Florida-Gainesville Ospreys, Cornell RTH, Montana Osprey Project, Steelscape Osprey Cam, Peregrine Falcon Networks, Institute for Wildlife Studies, Explore.org, Pix Cams, ND-LEEF, Barlinka Ospreys, Mlade Buky Storks, and Anacapa Falcons.