Wow..the pace is picking up. Wednesday in Bird World

15 March 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

It is my last day in Toronto, and as the old saying goes, ‘There is no place like home.’ Toronto is a fantastic city with so many things for everyone. It has been particularly busy because of the Harry Potter show, and March break for the students. Exciting to see young people at all the museums, going to the theatre, and looking at dinosaurs! A short break can recharge the batteries. It has been a fun time. I am, however, looking forward to being home with Missy and Lewis and everything familiar!

A few hours after the little one of Ron and Rose hatched at the WRDC Bald Eagle nest in Miami, DG3 hatched at Dulles-Greenway in Virginia, but that wasn’t the only other. My goodness. It would take a tiny army to keep up with all the nests, the pips, the hatches, and now the returns of the UK Ospreys. It will be crazy when they fledge on the same day.

Rose and Ron’s first hatch and this morning R5 is wanting to get out and join its older sibling.

Oh, R4 has been ‘goggly’ eyes.

Ron and Rose’s baby a couple of hours later. This eaglet has ‘strong’ and ‘trouble’ written all over it.

Gosh, Rose loves her fish! The little one is getting some bites at a later feeding, but Mum is making sure she gets plenty. Too funny. Just wait til that eaglet is the size of the Es!!!!!!

This eaglet covered with fish juice reminds me of Connick when Connie was figuring out feeding, and Connick was trying to focus and grab the fish from the beak.

HeidiMc taped the action for us. If someone could please move that piece of nesting material!!!!!!!!!!! All kidding aside – the feedings are improving from one to another. Well done, first-time Mum, Rose.

Rose is going to be a very busy Mum. R5 is pipping. ‘H’ says it was called at 0705 on the 15th of March.

Rosa telling Martin their first eaglet has hatched at Dulles-Greenway.

At least two nests are experiencing bad winter weather. One of those is Duke Farms. The parents got busy once the snow and wind came and fed both of the eaglets quickly so they did not get wet and sick.

That miserable weather got itself sorted. The nest at Duke Farms was drying out, and the eaglets were having a meal at 1827.

Big Red and Arthur were not at the nest today. So glad she doesn’t have eggs yet. Even though we know Big Red can be encased in ice and snow and keep her eggs warm, it would be much nicer for those watching if the weather were better!

It was still snowing at midnight at Cornell.

Two raptors who were at their nest working yesterday and today were Jackie and Shadow. What do you think? a replacement clutch? It is certainly starting to feel like a possibility.

Thanks ‘A’ for the link!

As I write this, it is 1700 at the SW Florida Bald Eagle nest of E21 and E22. The pair have spent the day standing on the rails and wing flapping. One small fish was delivered at 10:39. They had a lot of fish yesterday and are fine with this. Dad needs a break and he could be off fighting an ever-growing number of intruders in the territory. M15 has managed what many believed would be impossible. 6 weeks he has cared for these two alone. They are now 10 weeks old and within fledge range. We will start watching for branching soon. The average age of fledge in Florida for Bald Eagles is 11 weeks. Can you believe it?

I cannot see her talons, but this appears to be the female that landed in the nest the other day. Most of us got attached to R23-3, who has not been seen for many days. Let’s see how long this one lasts! Poor M. I am sure he would appreciate a companion that kept everyone else away while he finishes up raising the Es as a single parent.

The Bald Eagles are still going strong with the late hatch of Ron and Rose at Miami, all the new hatches in Virginia at Dulles-Greenway, a new baby at Tobacco Creek and so on.

Chandler and Hope’s new little one at Tobacco Creek, Maryland. Chandler has a lot of fish in that nest for Hope and the baby.

At Bluff City, Tennessee, Eugene and Frances have a little one at the ETSU (Eastern Tennessee State University) Bald Eagle nest. Goodness! On top of having a new baby to care for, Chandler has had to fight off intruders while trying to feed the new hatch!

At Johnson City, Tennessee, Jolene and Boone had a hatch, too!

Now the first osprey has landed at a streaming cam in the UK. It isn’t Maya on her nest but B25 from another nest

Everyone has their eyes set on the trackers watching as the ospreys and other birds enter UK territory after their winter break. On Tuesday, 6250 Black Kites crossed Gibraltar along with three ospreys.

Loch of the Lowes is so beautiful. Looking forward to your arrival Laddie, LM12, and Blue NC0.

Loch Arkaig is waiting for Louis and Dorcha.

At Moorings Park, Sally waited at 0830 for a fish delivery to feed the two osplets. It hadn’t arrived, and she sat back down on the pair! Their heads are now pretty bald and getting dark.

I am behind on reporting on the Venice Golf and Country Club ospreys but, it appears there has been a hatch there (perhaps on the 13th). The remnants of the egg can be seen at the rim of the nest.

Lou came to Annie’s aid in warding off an intruder. Thanks for catching this SK Hideaways! All I can say is ‘wow’.

‘A’ sent me a note. Lots of bonding – four minutes of it – by Diamond and Xavier in the scrape at Orange. Indigo might have been heard but, for now, the parents are enjoying time together.

There is snow in the East and rain coming down on the Channel Islands eagle nests. Audacity looks completely miserable at Sauces Canyon. One precious egg to keep warm, dry, and whole!

Cholyn at Two Harbours is wet, too.

Making news is this huge mess that is heading to Florida. How will this impact our beloved birds?

Thank you so much for being with me today! The Thursday blog will go out just a few hours later than usual. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their notes, tweets, posts, videos, and streaming cams that help make up my blog today: ‘A’, ‘H’, WRDC, HeidiMc and the WRDC, Sassa Bird, Dulles-Greenway, Duke Farms, Cornell RTH, FOBBV, SW Florida Eagles and D Pritchett, ETSU, Mary Kerr and Friends of Loch Arkaig, Osprey Sky Call, @Tommy Finlayson, Scottish Wildlife Trust and Friends of LOTL, Woodland Trust, People’s Post Code Lottery and Friends of Loch Arkaig, Moorings Park, VGCCO, Cal Falcons, Cali Condor, Charles Sturt Flacon Cam, IWS and Explore.org, and The New York Times.

Hatch at Duke Farms, GHO owlet with family, E22 is the fastest prey grabber…Tuesday in Bird World

28 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

Lewis and Missy hope you have had a wonderful start to the week. They are enjoying a new ‘dog bed’. It is so soft, and with their own blankets, they both decided that it was ‘OK’. They are way too big to share the small basket, and neither one will be alone!

They had to do everything together from the moment they came to their forever home. It is like synchronised living. Sleep, eat, drink water, poop, look out the window, play – it is always in tandem.

My goodness. Most of the time we think of a pip and then a wait to see how long it will be until hatch. Well, the first eaglet of the year has blasted out of the egg at Duke Farms. This is one strong eaglet. Want to bet she is a fierce formidable female?

Dad was on the nest checking on the progress.

The reveal came around 14:06.

Well, hello! Aren’t you amazing? Such a strong eaglet! Dad sees his chick for the very first time.

One strong eaglet! A nice fresh fish on the nest for Tuesday morning breakfast!

The first breakfast for Monday came in at 10:28:45 at the SW Florida nest of M15 and the Es. It was very difficult to see what that prey item was, actually. E22 mantled it and got a huge chunk. M15 found some small bits and kept 21 busy feeding him.

Another delivery came at 13:47:05. This time it was a small fish, not tiny but not huge. E21 was up at Dad’s beak first but 22 did his usual work around and got up to the beak to get some of that fish. E22 exhibited no fear as he touched beaks with 21 trying to get some fish. Meanwhile, the female is down in one of the trees not bothering what is going on at the nest. It appears that 21 and 22 play around trying to eat the skin and some bits and bobs.

E22 is the fastest eaglet on this nest and the best at self-feeding. He learned those traits early on when we all thought he might not survive. What a great eagle you will be 22.

M15 came in with another prey item at 14:54:14. It was difficult to tell which eaglet was which, but both got something to eat. I think it was 22 at the end who also had the bone and was chewing on it. Perhaps you held your breath seeing the adult above the nest, but thankfully, it was M15 just getting off the nest at 15:01:36.

I believe it is 21 on the left and 22 on the right by the tail feathers but, I could be so wrong.

M15 came in with another fish for the eaglets at 16:23:21. E21 got some first bites but E22 was quick to get itself into a position to snatch and grab from the right to the left!

E21 is on the left and E22 is on the right.

He just grabbed a big piece of fish!

22 pushes 21 back while keeping his beak up to get the fish.

The fish went back and forth, but E22 got it and finished it off quickly. Dad was back up to the branch at 16:28:38.

That might be the last feeding of the day. It has gone well. Thank you, M15.

They both look a little tattered. Harriet was M15’s first mate. She was a fierce eagle as we know and no one would mess with her chicks, her nest, or her territory. We wait to see how this goes.

I am warming up to her. Injuries, stress, hunger. They all trigger behaviours that might not otherwise take place. Yes, she has pecked and winged but, she has not injured E21 or E22. As we know she did, voluntarily or feeling forced, feed 21. She has protected the territory. M15 will need a ferocious mate to take on this popular territory together.

M15 brought a squirrel into the nest at 093215 for 21 and 22. He did some feeding but, in the end, it seems that 21 took some of it to self-feed. That is 22 getting fed by Dad below.

There appears to be, sadly, a territorial dispute going on at the Redding Bald Eagle nest of Liberty and Guardian. Guardian returned to the nest where Liberty is incubating their single egg for the season injured on Sunday. Injuries appear to be the left eye, the top of the head, and some frayed tail feathers.

A short time in Ron and Rose’s nest, a shift change. I love the chortling.

Everyone is counting down the time to eggs and I am thinking that it is two weeks. Around 13 March for Big Red and Arthur. So happy they are back at the nest on the Fernow Light Stand so that we can watch them raise their eyases.

Meanwhile, L4 is still with the young hawk and still on Mum and Dad’s territory as far as I am aware.

The heavy snowfall promised to hit the northeastern US is now falling on Big Red and Arthur’s nest in Ithaca, New York.

Indigo is still home! And he is loud. Missy and Lewis always want the volume off. For some reason, Indigos’ screeching scares them.

If you want to glimpse the four owlets at the Corona Owl Nest, you need to watch during the night or do a good rewind. There are four of them, and voting will begin on naming the four on March 6. Check out the chat with the live stream: Corona Owls on YouTube.

At Taiaroa Head, home to the Royal Albatross Colony, Sweet Pea does her very first sky call. Lady Hawk caught it for us!

Jackie and Shadow made the news in Greece. I keep saying if love could fill that nest with little eaglets, that nest would be spilling over. Fingers crossed for a successful second clutch and hatch in the future. If you are wondering, yes, it is possible. When Harriet and M15 lost Sassy Pants, M15 wanted another clutch of eggs. Those two eaglets hatched and were named Miracle and Grace.

Making News:

I brought you the news from CROW about a GHO owlet that had fallen out of a tree and was placed in a laundry basket hoping the parents would feet it. The story gets quite amazing. A wellness check was done, the original nest located, a sibling and lots of food in the nest – and even more special, the adults welcomed the ‘lost’ baby back into the family! Thank you, CROW.

They stopped the fireworks in the UK not to disturb this amazing walrus named Thor. Today, he was discovered in Iceland!

Please don’t tell any gamekeepers on those moors!

‘EJ’ sent an article to me explaining it isn’t the type they usually send. It is hard to believe that some individuals take shotguns and are called ‘removers’. They are culling one owl species for another. Honestly, I think humans should leave nature to nature. Do we actually understand what we are doing to wildlife and the planet? — Sorry, I am ‘getting started’. Nothing has convinced me that we are proper conservators of our home and theirs or that we have insights that make us superior. I wish it were different.

https://www.salon.com/2023/02/26/professional-owl-terrorists-scare-off-barred-owls-with-shotguns-in-the-name-of-conservation/

The author says: “Remover” was an accurate term for what Hunt did. But it was a euphemism. Hunt is one of the best in the business at shooting barred owls out of trees with a shotgun. The twenty-eight-year-old, slightly-built wildlife management specialist from Belmont, New York, had spent five winters tracking barred owls and systematically blasting them from the canopy with a twelve-gauge. The goal was to reduce the barred owl population enough to relieve the pressure on spotted owls. It was a divisive study generating high emotions on all sides. But Hunt loved the work. “I’m kinda sad the removal part is over,” she said.”

This is wonderful news. I am certain that when Rita was injured, we wished this might have been the outcome. It was not to be but, for this couple, it was the perfect ending. Congratulations to all!

Here is the whole story:

Some bird humour compliments of the Webster Texas Eagles FB page.

The season’s first egg is at one of the Peregrine Falcon’s nests in Japan. Congratulations! For those who would like to watch this scrape, I have messaged the site to get a link. The scrape fledged four little eyases in 2022.

A former student ‘CD’, now teaching her university-level science classes, posted this today. Do you know about these women who saved the birds?

Thank you so much for being with us today! Take care, everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their tweets, notes, posts, videos, and streaming cams that help make up my blog: ‘CD’, ‘EJ’, Duke Farms, SW Florida Eagle Cam and D Pritchett, Gary and FORE, @Cornell Hawks, Valerie Valicento and Cornell Hawk Cam Chatters, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, Corona Owls, Lady Hawk and NZ DOC, Maria Grigoriadou and FOBBV, Heidi Mc and WRDC, CROW, BBC, Google Maps, Yorkshire Post, Salon.com, Sydney Wells and Bald Eagles Live Nest Cam and Nests, Webster Texas Eagle Watchers, Ashai Falcon Kirara, Women Who Saved Birds.

Will the Es be fed, balloons banned, Avian Flu in Japan…Friday in Bird World

24 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

There is some good news, and there is worrisome news this morning. This 2023 breeding season has really started off like a wild roller-coaster ride.

First…a big shout-out to Laguna Beach, California. They have banned balloons to save the ocean and wildlife. Let’s see who will stand up for the planet and its living inhabitants next.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/feb/23/california-laguna-beach-bans-balloons-ocean?CMP=share_btn_link

Spring is coming to the UK. I wait for the Ospreys to tell me but, some are watching the Blue Tits starting their nesting.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/feb/21/country-diary-its-started-the-blue-tits-are-house-hunting?CMP=share_btn_link

Thursday has been a very tense day in Bird World. The female with the black talon attacked M15 when he brought a fish to the eaglets for breakfast on Thursday morning. She chased him around the pasture and then flapped him off the nest. It is mid-afternoon, and M15 has not fed the eaglets. The female with the black talon is on the branch below M15, above the nest.

M15 at the very end of the tree doing security. Or is he waiting for her to leave? We should never underestimate this female. She is larger and heavier than M15, and she is determined. Her talons demonstrate that she is not afraid to engage, and we know from footage around the nest site that she has protected the area. It is extremely difficult to anticipate what she will do next but, it seems that any food M15 brings could be grabbed by her and not get to the mouths of the eaglets.

Females injured feet and talons.

SW Florida video of the interaction.

Getting older.

Beautiful hot, and hungry babies. They are 7 weeks old.

It is 17:15 on the SW Florida Nest. No food has arrived. It is now after 1800, and M15 is not at the nest tree. The Es are searching for any old scraps that they can find. We wait.

I worried M15 might not return, but he did. He is on the branch of the nest tree with the black-talon female. We wait in the hope that the eaglets will be fed on Friday. M15 is caught in a terrible dilemma. If he brings food to the eaglets, the female will swoop and eat it. Then he has to quickly get more for the eaglets, ensuring the female does not injure him. He did this successfully the other day. Will he be able to do it again?

M15 has walked a fine line since Harriet disappeared, trying to do everything single-handedly. This female may not allow him to continue to feed the eaglets as he did so valiantly. If that is the case, I hope that CROW has the permit to remove them so that they can eat, learn to fly, and fledge safely. If that should happen, I do not think anyone will forget the good fight that M15 undertook to raise his eaglets under the most difficult of circumstances.

SW Florida Eagle Cam reminds us:

It is Friday morning 11:00, and the eaglets are yet to be fed. Did I say that I am extremely worried about them? Another person has been caught leaving food! Did I say that the eaglets’ ps are getting thin? If M15 doesn’t feed them because of injury to himself, them, or both, will CROW remove the eaglets and care for them til they fly free?

Maybe if I send this quick he will fly in with a big meal for them but, alas, I fear that the fight in the nest and the fact she took two meals in a row and chased him might have changed this. Stay strong babies!

So where does someone go if they want to see stability and tranquillity? Well, there are many choices. The first up for me would be Gabby and V3. No eaglets to worry about. No intruders at the nest. Just nice and quiet. Both have eaten well and have crops. They are in good physical shape, and V3 has ensured that the revolving door of suitors is closed. Gabby saw his great potential and accepted him. While we may have gone after looks, it seems she went after a good security guard that also was quite handsome. Hopefully, they will have eaglets next year. Like everything else in Bird World, we wait.

Of the nests that have eaglets, Captiva is a good choice, but there are intruders sometimes. The KNF-E1 and E-3 nests of Anna and Louis or Alex and Andria have plenty of food and are doing well. It is difficult to tell precisely what is happening at Superbeaks, but at least one of the eaglets has fledged, and both have branched. This has been a great nest to observe. The Royal Cam nest is always sedate and beautiful until the parents begin leaving the chick. This has just started happening, and now there is anxiety because of the number of juveniles or non-bonded individuals cavorting around SP.

Meanwhile, winter storms are troubling some nests. Jackie is going to begin to get very hungry. Do her and Shadow have a food stash? They must!

Jackie and Shadow are valiantly dealing with a big winter storm in the Big Bear Valley area. This is Shadow in the nest Thursday. More than 14,000 people are watching and wishing. If our love could give them a viable egg, they would have a full nest!

Shadow brought in a ‘black’ bird for dinner at 15:53. The couple switched incubation duties while it was plucked and eaten. All I can think of is — if it is hard to hunt prey today, is it now the pesky Ravens that are being served up?

Nancy and Beau are dealing with a winter storm at their nest in Minnesota, too.

Nancy’s new mate, Beau, is good at bringing in fish for Mum and taking over incubation duties.

There is snow in Iowa at both the Decorah North nest (top three images) and Decorah (bottom). We tend to worry more about the eagles when they are buried under snow than when it is hot. We look at them and think that they will freeze. In reality, the snow and cold are better than the heat. Eagles are also so intelligent – as we all know. According to my grandmother, they are much better weather predictors than any meteorologist. If you had watched, they would have prepared the nest with more materials. We saw this in Iowa and Minnesota recently. They might also stash prey items. The eggs will be nestled cosy, deep in the nest, safe and warm.

At the nest of KNF-E1 Anna and Louis, Trey was doing some winging when Dudley blew up! That is one way to get rid of an egg on a nest. It was obviously non-viable!

The Mum at ND-LEEF, Little Bit ND17’s mother, has been missing now for 19 days. There is a new younger female at the nest but the relationship between Dad and her is anything but cordial. The South Bend news carries the story of our beloved missing mother from the nest in St Joseph’s Park in South Bend, Indiana.

‘H’ sent me a lovely note and images about the Captiva Osprey this morning. Angus and Florence mated four times (looks successful) and had a lovely spa bath together during the day. Things are looking up for a change—some nice news on a Friday morning.

Last year we were entranced with Thunder and Akecheta raising three eaglets. This year they have moved their nest. Oh, how we will miss this amazing family! It is nice to see them even at a distance, though.

Happy Hatch day for two more Kakapo. What a brilliant year 2022 was for the Kakapo Recovery. 55 chicks. 55!

Sweet Pea or South Plateau Chick is now in the post-guard stage. It spent the day panning the horizon for intruders and worked on gardening around the nest.

Bird Flu impacts almost every country in the world. I want to thank one of our readers from Japan for alerting me to this situation. Thank you ‘A’.

Over 10 million birds have been culled in Japan because of Avian Influenza. On the northernmost island of Hokkaido, the first Tanbaku Crane was discovered to have the flu when it died in late October. Since then, there have been—–

Oriental White Storks are Special National Treasures in Japan.

They are smaller than the most famous of the Cranes, the Red-Crowned. They average 110-150 cm in height, or 43 inches to 59 inches tall and weigh anywhere from 6-13 lbs or 2.8-5.9 kg. Their wingspan is quite large at 7.3 feet or 2.2 metres. They have a black beak, red around the eyes and bright white irises. This is the best way to tell them from the Red-Crowned cranes.

The storks live on insects, small fish and reptiles, as well as small mammals. They are a top Apex wetland predator and like Ospreys and Bald Eagles in North America, their presence is a good indicator of a healthy environment. These beautiful wading birds originally lived and searched for their prey in the ride paddies. The industrialisation of agriculture, which included the use of pesticides and chemicals, killed off their natural food sources. The change from having natural waterways connected to rivers to concrete drainage and irrigation was also detrimental. Humans could flood the rice paddies quickly, which meant that many amphibians, such as tadpoles, that the storks relied on for food did not mature. So we now have also a loss of habitat with the logging of pine forests. Many succumbed to mercury poisoning from these pesticides and chemicals and could not breed. This is, of course, very similar to the issues of DDT use in North America. The very last wild storks were seen in 1971, again, a similar time table to the decline of the Apex raptors in the US.

These gorgeous birds are featured in many works of art and on buildings throughout Japan. The risk of extinction caused them to be designed as a special national treasure in 1956 when there were 20 wild storks left. Plans to breed the storks in captivity began to be discussed. It was not until 1985, when Russia translocated six young storks to Japan, that there was hope. Four years later, one pair raised their first chick in the wild! Meanwhile, 300 storks have been bred in captivity and released. Their new threat is Avian Flu.

The female stork hatched in April 2022 and was banded. Her name was Niji, and she was discovered dead at a pond in Muragame on 15 November. Tests indicated that it was the highly pathogenic H5 strain of avian flu. This will have a devastating impact on all the water birds of Japan.

東方白鸛 Oriental White Stork” by Hiyashi Haka is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

Hyogo prefectural homeland for the Oriental white stork, Japan” by pelican is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.

The image above is Storks by Ohara Boson.

When you think it is too much at some of the nests, just read this. The raptors do not mess around when it comes to territory. They protect it – often to the death.

I can assure you that all of the eaglets on the nests – save for 21 and 22 – are being well-fed. Eggs are being incubated. There are intruders and sub-adults, even following Jackie at Big Bear today. Mating occurs in the hope of eggs and spring at other nests.

Thank you so much for being with me. Please take care! See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their notes, videos, announcements, and streaming cams, where I took my screen, captures for the newsletter today: ‘A’, ‘B’, The Guardian, SW Florida Eagle Cam and D Pritchett, SW Florida Eagle Cam, NEFL-AEF, FOBBV, MN-DNR, Raptor Resource Project and Explore.org, KNF-E1, South Bend Tribune, ‘H’ and Window to Wildlife, Gracie Shepherd and Raptors of the World, Kakapo Recovery, Cornell Bird Lab and NZ DOC, OpenVerse, and Ciryon Hoop and Raptors of the World FB.

Cal Falcon Male is named Lou; 22 horks a huge piece of fish; Did M15 mate with one of the females?…Thursday in Bird World

23 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone!

As I write this, it is 1900 on the Canadian Prairies, and the temperature has risen to -20 C from -29 C this morning. Frigid temperatures such as this will prevail into late Sunday. With the strong winds, this Arctic front is bringing us wind chill temperatures of -45 C. Did I mention that humans should hibernate? Or that I am thrilled to have central heating? And fluffy warm socks?


First up, the name of the new male falcon at Cal Falcons is Lou! It makes perfect sense!!!!!!!!! A woman and a scientist, and Annie’s partner in life. Let’s hope that Lou will be around for some time so that Annie can stop having to break in a new partner. She has had 3 in a year. Berkeley Edu explains the connection!!!!!!!!!

“Lou is the current mate of Annie, Berkeley’s longtime female falcon, who lost her previous mates — Grinnell and Alden — in 2022. The name is a nod to Louise Kellogg (1879-1967), a Berkeley alumna who was the partner of Annie’s namesake, Annie Alexander (1867-1950). Alexander was an explorer and naturalist who founded the UC Museum of Paleontology and the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.”

Good Morning Everyone from the Es…. look at them. How adorable and healthy. ‘A’ mentioned to me the sharp beaks and that these sweet innocents could take my arm off if they wanted. True. The Es should be the size of nice turkeys by now thanks to the persistence of M15.

Still, couldn’t you just stare at those sweet faces all day? Now we have to watch carefully as it will get much more difficult to know who is who.

M15, you are incredible. Working hard to prepare these babies to fly free.

Watching Dad fly over?

There were several food deliveries at the SW Florida eagle nest by M15 on Wednesday up to mid-afternoon at 14:06. There was the first one at 08:27 when 22 figured to walk around to the left side of Dad so he could eat some fish. Good strategy. Then at 11:13:28. It looks like another around 12:54 when 22 grabs half a fish and spends the next ten minutes horking it. Then there was the 14:06. All in all, both have eaten well, and we should applaud 22 for figuring out some good strategies to go along with his very proficient snatch-and-grab technique.

At 12:57, 22 gets the last of the tail down.

At the same time, it must be pointed out that E22 wing flapping ON THE RAILS at 11:44. Yes, seriously. Can we use the word ‘dare devil’?

22 eating at the end of the 14:06 delivery. He gets a lot of fish during this meal. M15 obliged by moving the fish about as well, which always tends to help 22. At the same time, M15 is trying to get 22 to step up and eat. He will need to be brave, really brave, out in that world of eagles.

M15 knows what goes on at the nest. He watches and he must be proud of 22 today.

Prey item 6 came in around 17:03:19, and the ‘black-taloned’ female was above watching. She had already eaten an entire fish that M15 brought in around 16:12. She landed in the nest, gave M15 a flap to leave, and ate the entire fish. It took about half an hour. The Es stayed submissive but kept on about their business. She ate and ate and had a huge crop after. She did not harm the eaglets.
Meanwhile, Dad went to get another meal for them. M15 and R-23-3 may be forming a partnership. We will wait and see. I hope, if this is the case that she is strong and formidable.

16:39. Finishing up.

At 16:42, after eating, look at her crop! She is an opportunist.

This time she only hovered over M15 while he fed the eaglets. Both 21 and 22 got food. She did not get in the nest, and M15 seems to have dismissed her. She flew away.

17:03

She returned. There is a lot of confusion over the identity of this female and whether or not it is the ‘black talon’ one or the one without an inury. The angle makes it difficult to see the top of the toe but, there does appear to be damage to a toe if you look carefully…the black park looks like the flesh part not the black talon.

And is this an attempted mating? M15 is no stranger to mating. Remember Harriet kicking him all the time? This female does not move her tail over, and M15 is near the head. There appears to be no connection. It looks like he just jumped on her back for a second. Perhaps to get her moving? I wonder.

Guarding the territory together.

Humans are still dropping off food at the nest or hiring courier services to pick up fillets of salmon and leave them at the base of the nest tree!!!!!! Can you believe this? No wonder the additional raptors – that could put the family in harm – are hanging around the nest tree!!!!!!!! Salmon. Gracious. This food has also drawn carrion eaters to an area they did not know existed. Now they do. Donate the money to CROW but do not put the SW Florida Eagle family in long-term danger. Killing with Kindness.

Everyone knows I love cats and I am a day late because of the time difference. My apologies to our friends in Japan. Yesterday was ‘National Cat Day’ in Japan. I have seen these cats at the stations. They are marvellous. So today, I am slipping in a little ‘cat’ to the newsletter in celebration.

In Brittany, they are topping off trees to encourage Osprey nesting! What a concept – helping our raptors instead of tearing their nests down. Love it.

 https://www.francebleu.fr/infos/environnement/un-premier-nid-de-balbuzard-pecheur-en-foret-de-rennes-des-arbres-etetes-pour-favoriser-le-retour-du-rapace-8446484. Plus d’informations sur https://www.francebleu.fr.

A new phase has arrived at the Royal Cam nest on Taiaroa Head. SP chick has been left alone in the nest, with no parent, today. It is the post-guard phase. It is also raining. I found that this always made my heart sink, and yet they do so well. I wonder how much gardening SP will do? And let us all hope that no visitors torment the wee one.

SP will now wait for the parents to return with food. If there are issues, it is comforting to know that Ranger Sharyn and her team do supplemental feedings!

The little one did not have to wait long until Mum was home with a meal. Easing Sweet Pea into the post-guard stage. Brilliant. L fed her chick, stayed with her, left, returned, and left again. She is easing her baby into being alone. Letting SP know she will return.

The weather at Big Bear continues to be cold and windy. Jackie is rolling and keeping the eggs warm—no indication of an official pip call. My heart is beginning to ache for these two, and wanting to be wrong. Wanting a pip.

Such commitment. Everyone is hoping for a miracle.

Happy Hatch Day to two Kakapo!

Decoys can also be used to lure waterfowl to safe enclosures!

Angus and Florence could give us some funny moments during the 2023 breeding season. So far, Angus has shoved Florence off the nest, making her dangle from one talon. Then he worried about what he had done and tried to help, or so it appeared. Then there are eight fish…I wonder what else is coming our way?

Gary gives us an update on why there might be only one egg for Liberty and Guardian this year at the Redding Eagle nest.

Sunnie Day posted one of those good news stories, and I wanted to share it with you. They saw they got help when they couldn’t untangle the eagle, and then 50 lbs of fish came in to help feed the raptor. The generosity of kind people. It exists.

Do you live within driving distance of the Kistachie National Forest in Louisiana? Would you like a guided tour of the area and a chance to see the nests with a scope? Check it out!

The voting has closed for the name of Annie’s ‘new guy’. Annie has even voted. Which name did she choose? Well, of course, it had to be Lou.

Thank you so very much for joining me today. Take care! See you soon.

If you want to join our Bird World family, please subscribe. I try to only fill your inbox with one newsletter a day. You can unsubscribe at any time!

Thank you so much to the following for their notes, observations, posts, tweets, videos, and streaming cams that make up my newsletter today: ‘A’, ‘H’, Cal Falcons Cam, Berkeley.edu, SWFL Eagle Cam and D Pritchett, WGCU, Japan: The Government of Japan, Francebleau.fr, NZ DOC, FOBBV, Kakapo Recovery, Archipelago Research and Conservation, WRDC, Gary and FORE, Sunnie Day FB, Blackland Prairie Raptor Centre, and US Forestry Service.

Falcons return to scrape, E22 gets some food and flaps wing at sib…Wednesday in Bird World

15 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

It is Valentine’s Day (as I begin writing Wednesday’s blog) and it would feel a lot more warm and fuzzy if fish started falling from the sky on the SWFlorida Eagle nest. The FFV has been protecting the area (photographs by local photographers confirm this). Her right foot has lots of injuries as if she has been in a recent fight during the last 2 or 3 days. She might need some time to heal before she is able to help bring in prey. I wonder how she is eating? M15 helped Harriet in 2015! The eaglet was E6. There are other examples of male or female eagles stepping in to help raise eaglets that are not theirs, also. There is a snow storm with high winds hitting Jackie and Shadow after three days of their on again-off again relationship with the two eggs they guarded so closely for over a month. It seems things are back to normal in Big Bear. If the earthquakes have significantly decreased, I am going to really think they might have had something to do with their behaviour for 3 days.

So, some good news was needed to mend my aching head and heart and it wasn’t, however, the third egg laid at the Achieva Osprey nest in St Petersburg, Florida on Valentine’s Day at 03:30. No, it came in the form of three pieces of news. The first one was a tweet from Geemeff Wednesday morning:

It is a huge beginning. Come on North America!!!!!!!!!!!

The second is form ‘H’ saying that all three of the falcons at Orange have been seen on the tower. Excellent.

The third is news about a small owl named Flaco that had been living at the Zoo at Central Park. Someone cut the wire to its cage and the owl escaped. Flaco has been seen eating and living nicely in the wild around New York City’s Central Park by a circus of curiosity seekers and residents. Zoo officials thought that Flaco could not live in the wild but he is proving them wrong. We learn something new every day from our raptors!

The New York Times reports for Valentine’s Day on Flaco…In the image below there is a bait tap but Flaco is not hungry!

“A major concern for everyone at the beginning was whether Flaco would be able to hunt and eat,” the society said in a statement, noting that zoo employees had observed him catching and consuming prey. “That is no longer a concern.” The officials from the Zoo also said, “In addition to proving himself as a hunter, the society said in its statement, Flaco had shown “a rapid improvement in his flight skills and ability to confidently maneuver around the park.”

The image above is a baited trap. Right now Flaco is full form his good hunting and is ‘not taking the bait’. The goal, according to the article, is to retrieve Falco and bring him back into the safety of the Zoo where he would not fall prey to rodenticide, GHO attack or killing, and collisions. Those are the risks of any urban raptor (or songbird for that matter). I find myself torn – while I believe in intervention, Flaco appears to be doing quite well living the ‘wild’ life.

Good news is also coming out of Orange. Xavier and Indigo have been back to the scrape. We wait and hope that Diamond was not too traumatised…Cilla says that Xavier will check and make sure it is safe and inform Diamond. Well done, Orange falcons.

Xavier made sure Indigo had a good breakfast. Look at that nice prey item that is in the scrape! (or am I wrong and this is Indigo’s great hunting?). The image was taken around 0849, the 15th of February in Orange.

Elain captured yesterday’s highlights.

I was so used to the Landings Nest near Savannah being an Osprey nest…then it was taken over by a GHO couple. Yes, those owlets are adorable. :)). I just wish they would leave the eagles alone!

An Osprey flew by this morning. Getting hopes up!

Heading to the SWFlorida nest..I am taking a bit of a breather today. E21 is 41 days old today and E22 is 39 days old. I am still concerned for E22 but, I want to be hopeful. Observers at the SWFlorida nest have posted this explanation as to what they think is going on at the nest. M15’s duty right now is to finish raising these eaglets. The female wants M15 and the territory ——she should be interviewed. There would be 100s of 5 year old female eagles wanting to match up with this super guy. I just wish she would prove her devotion by not just doing security but also becoming Mommy Door Dash.

This was also posted on the SWFL FB group this morning:

E22 is hungry. Dad jumped down first thing and fed the old fish tail to 21. Wishing for several big ones.

Bird with long legs and tail feathers came on the nest – it was a carcass. If the whole bird had made it, maybe 22 would have had some good food. I wonder what is going on. M15 ate, 21 ate, and 22 got some bites. Not many. Some by his quick snatch and grab out of 21 and Dad’s beak. Some up at the table when there was not much left.

On top of everything else, now there are drones. When will M15 cut a break?

At 1828, E22 got bold. Tired of having 21 get all the food for the day – and I do want to use the word ‘starving’, 22 went for it. M15 backed up a bit to help 22 and there was some quick snatch and grabs. It is unclear to me how much fish 22 got after 21 ate – 21 has a crop in the image below. The snatch and grab netted him a number of bites. And 22 was bold – he has to be. His life depends on it. I have seen statements that he got lots to eat. I would not characterise it as that but…he ate. And he had a ps that looked reasonable during the day. Someone got a screen capture of it.

It was frenzied for 22 who worked to get between Dad and 21 and grab every bite he could. Some were a nice size. We wait til morning. Again, the fish was not huge, 22 got some at the end.

After the feeding, M15 joined the FFV in the tree.

Wednesday morning M15 and the FFV were close on the tree.

M15 came in with a fish which 21 seems to have gotten the best of. 21 bonked 22 to keep it away. At 09:38 21 is self feeding on a leftover fish piece and 22 grabs it and takes it and wolfs it down. He is hungry.

To be clear, this is a small piece of fish and 21 will retake it, then 22 will get it back, and then M15 will fly down again. Someone said that in all of this 21 ate half a fish – if I had seen 21 eat half a fish I would be jumping on top of my roof for joy.

At 10:49, 21 is still eating and 22 is trying to find a scrap.

There is no shortage of food at many of the other nests. Still it helps to be ‘the one and only apple or Valentine of your parent’s heart’. Connick has an enormous crop! Looks like he is trying out for the role in some super hero movie with those amazing wings and big strong legs! Granted it is hard to take your eyes off that enormous crop to look at those wings and legs. He is one healthy eaglet…and I for one, wondered if he would make it early on. Well, no worries here. His smile is yellow and the black of his beak is shiny and healthy. Of course, nice clown feet, too, Connick…they go well with the mini-mohawk.

B16 is adorable. Notice the difference between B16 below and Connick above. Ask me if I would like to see 22 look like this? Of course.

There is something terribly ‘sweet’ about this little eaglet..I don’t know quite what it is but, something. Now look at B16’s wings. Consider for a moment how large they are.

The cameras have been on and off in the Kisatchie National Forest. The eaglets are fine and all of them are growing and developing those gorgeous juvenile feathers that we are going to see on Connick all too soon.

Gorgeous Trey. The IR camera really shows the thermal down and where the juvenile feathers are coming. Trey is incubating Dudley! She takes good care of that old unviable egg. Practice for the future. You can just see a little triangle of white almost directly under her beak. That is Dudley.

Anna and Trey with Dudley hiding underneath Trey.

Valentine and Nugget are simply developing into beautiful feathered eaglets. Valentine seems to have had a huge growth spurt…or is it the camera angle?

Jackie and Shadow have had at least one shift change today and they are both staying close to the nest and those two precious eggs. The storm system with snow and winds moving through is due to pass later today (Tuesday as I am writing).

The couple look much more settled.

At 11:06 Jackie called Shadow and he was there in a second to relieve her and incubate. Not leaving those eggs for a second longer than necessary. Am I thinking that we are back to normal and that pip watch is tomorrow? Hope.

Gabby and V3 were at the natal tree perched on the branches and in the nest bowl doing some work today. Gabby is in really good condition. Look at the colour of her beak and her feathers. Her eyes are clear. She is not tired and she is really healthy.

There are now three eggs at the Achieva Osprey nest. I mentioned it in yesterdays blog. So right now we have three osprey nests that have eggs being incubated in Florida: Moorings Park, Venice Golf and Country Club, and now Achieva in St Petersburg. We wait to see if there will be any eggs at Captiva this year for new couple Mabel and Angus.

Beautiful Diane will be doing hard incubation for between 38-43 days. Mark your calendars. Looks like 24-29 March. Later than 2021. (No eggs survived in 2022).

Most of you know that I am very fond of Diane and often get rather irked at Jack. Some of us even thought he had 2 nests in 2021 – the fish delivery was erratic and poor little Tiny Tot Tumbles, the third hatch, well…was deemed to be on death’s doorstep, literally, several times but, thanks to her Mum who saw her daughter want to live, fed her catfish after the two older siblings were sound asleep. In the dark, the little one ate and ate. TTT become the dominant bird on the nest staying long after the older two had fledged. She even helped her dad defend the nest and I want to add, as a juvenile having hatched in early March, she defended the nest many times by herself beginning in June. So….a warm soft spot for this Osprey Mum. I wish that third hatch had a band. Several times it looked like she visited the nest late in 2021 and in 2022.

Other Bird News:

Several months ago I added a note about two individuals that care for Cockatoos – sanctuaries for unwanted birds. One was April whose Victoria Cockatoo was believed to be dying and required urgent medical care. Individuals came to the rescue with their donations and now Victoria Cockatoo has gained weight and is doing extremely well.

The other was Dan Scott with Chloe’s Sanctuary. Funds are now in place for Dan and his flock of 11 ‘highly needy’ Cockatoos to take up residence in a new home in Nevada. Their old home in California was flooded. Thank you to all who answered their call.

Most people think Cockatoos are beautiful. So do I. We know that they are highly intelligent. Not Sulphur-Crested but Guffins have demonstrated that they can use tools!

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2023/feb/10/goffins-cockatoos-use-toolset-complete-tasks?CMP=share_btn_link

People want one as a pet – that is what some of the YouTube videos do…make us want a pet bird.

Around the world, people go to pet stores and buy birds instead of going to sanctuaries. This means that the rescued or sanctuary animals could be euthanised if no home is found. I was sent a list of parrots, cockatoos and budgies requiring homes in one European city. It was huge. There is a growing call – by individuals that have ‘rescued’ parrots and budgies as well as animal right’s persons – to stop the breeding and sale of birds.

Two pet stores in North America that are getting a lot of attention because of their relationship to puppy mills, and other factory breeding programmes for animals, birds, and amphibians are PetSmart and PetCo. You may know these companies. Organisations that want the rights and lives of animals to be respected are asking customers to boycott those stores. Wallets do speak loud when profits are the only concern! There are a number of videos on YouTube that you can access showing dumpster divers finding fish and amphibians literally being tossed in to die. But there are just as many concerns for the dogs, cats, and birds as well. Our beloved feather friends often come from pet mills that are anything but caring and will do what they can to cut costs and maximise profits. So before you buy a bird from a pet store, think twice. Before you buy pet and bird food at a pet store, think about which store and what their policies are that you are supporting. Call your local organisations to see if your local humane society or rescue centre has any birds. Check out the reputation of the company selling the animal. A certificate saying an animal is a purebred does not mean that it came from a caring lovely small family breeder. Believe me I can tell you horror stories about cat breeders! Ask about surrenders and rescues. Give them a second chance at life. Parrots and Cockatoos live for a long time and many outlive their owners. Planning should be in place for all feathered friends just as you might do a dog or cat. Research the species. Every one of my contacts with Cockatoos warns that they are like tyrannical toddlers. I am also told that getting a beak trimmed can cost anywhere from $100-140 and the beaks must be trimmed.

‘J’ reminded me this morning that you can also adopt a ‘Cockatoo or a Parrot’ from a sanctuary which will help with their care. Many allow you to visit your adoptee. What an idea…a win-win for all. Some provide photographs.

Birds can be fantastic friends. My maternal grandfather had a Blue Budgie. My grandmother knew he adored that bird more than her! Think first! Thank you for listening…we need to be mindful, always, of the welfare of the animals and birds, both in our care and in the wild.

Thank you so much for being with me today. If you haven’t done so, do suggest a name for the new guy in Annie’s life. Go to Cal Falcons FB Page. I am not certain how long they will take potential names. Take care everyone. See you soon….please continue to send your good wishes to M15 and E21 and 22, our dear Diamond so traumatised by the fireworks, as well as Zoe who has yet to send in a transmission.

Thank you to the following for their notes, essays, articles, videos, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures that form this blog: ‘A’, ‘H’, ‘Geemeff’, and ‘J’, The New York Times, Charles Sturt Falcon Cam, Elain and the Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, Cornell Bird Lab, SWFlorida Eagles FB and Lisa Marie, Iris Schneider and the SWFL Eagles FB, SWFlorida Eagle Cam and D Pritchett, Paul Kolnik and Bald Eagles 101 FB, Window to Wildlife, Berry College Eagle Cam, KNF-E1, KNF-E3, FOBBY, NEFL-AEF, Achieva Credit Union, Victoria’s Playhouse, and The Guardian.

Another miracle day, eggs and more eggs…Thursday in Bird world

9 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone!

It has been precisely a week since the iconic Southwest Florida Bald Eagle, Harriet, went missing. Search parties are still looking for the Queen, hoping to find her and trying everything possible including vocalisations. Another team is set to head out on Saturday searching through some thick brush areas. So far there has been no sight of her and there have been no birds taken to wildlife rehab centres that are Harriet. The resolve to not give up is strong in many around the Fort Myers nest site who have watched Harriet raise her eaglets with Ozzie and then M15 who was, apparently, the ‘Frequent Visitor’ mentioned in many reports. We wish everyone well as they give their all and their love to trying to find dear Harriet.

Meanwhile, M15 continues to take fantastic care of the eaglets. Someone said if there is a silver lining to all of this it has been the amazing care that M15 has given to the nest. There were no less than 8 feedings on Wednesday. E22 had such a huge crop that it simply could hardly walk!

This was how E22 looked at 13:08. Do eaglets get indigestion?

M15 returned for the 7th feeding at 15:44:55 with a really nice fish.

E21 got up first to eat having dropped its crop from the very early feedings. E22 was simply not interested in food. Can you imagine? E22 not interested in food? Our Snatch and Grab King! There would have been no place to put even a flake of prey having eaten at least one if not two fish earlier! M15 fed then half the fish to 21 and left the other half on the nest. Wise move, Dad.

At 16:44 E22 watches Dad aerate the nest. Notice how big that crop still is. Not much difference from 13:08. E22 is full up to the dandelions on top of its head!

M15 returned at 17:24. E22 still had no interest in eating and 21 went to bed (as did 22) with a nice crop.

Both of the eaglets were fed well and are being taken care of diligently – and protected – by their Dad. M15 even did some aerating of the nest and tried to cover 21 with nest material which caused me to laugh. Prior to Harriet’s disappearance, M15 loved to cover up the babies with the nest materials. All is well on this nest. In the on line discussion this evening hosted by Christian Sasse, it was noted that the people for the most part have left the area and those leaving food are no longer a problem. This is great news. M15 can get on with it and we already know that he is up to the job!

Good night, Dad.

It is Thursday morning and M22 has already brought a fish in for breakfast. E21 has a great crop and 22 got fed some fish, too.

Postscript: I missed this entirely. M15 brought in two white rats on the 7th of February, Tuesday. E21 ate all of them. Lady Hawk caught it in a video.

Where in the world do you get white rats/mice with pink eyes? (You know what I am thinking already, don’t say it..that word that begins with an R).


Other Nest and some Other News Thrown In – in no particular order!

A new couple have moved into Sue and Otto’s territory at the Graveyard at Syracuse University. Here is that announcement.

Congratulations to Diane and Jack whose first egg of the 2023 season came after an amazing labour display at 06:51 on the 8th of February in St Petersburg, Florida.

It’s two eggs for Ron and Rose at the WRDC Eagle nest in Miami! Oh, things are starting to get busy with all these eggs. It will be difficult to keep up with them. Congratulations to this new couple! Ron will be an amazing mate for young Rose and we all hope that Rita is recovering well in rehab.

Pat Burke called it at 18:09:57.

HeidiMc got it on video:

The cold winds are whistling around the MN-DNR nest of Nancy and her new mate. Both were at the nest. Nancy spent a lot of time on the nest today – in the nest bowl. I wonder if there is an egg in there? I cannot see one. Tonight, standing guard.

Do you live in New York City? near Central Park? have you seen an unusual owl? Geemeff sent me news that there is an owl on the loose. It is not just any owl that has lived in the wild all its life. No, vandalism caused Flaco, at the Central Park Zoo, to leave his cage Thursday night – the same day that Harriet went missing. Flaco has never had to feed itself and the weather in the area is worrying many. Here is the story:

https://www.insidehook.com/daily_brief/science/zoo-freed-nyc-central-park-zoo-vandalism

Imagine a penguin bigger than you ever thought possible…well, it happened in New Zealand.

We are focused on M15 – a male Apex Raptor taking care of his eaglets after his mate disappears. Around the world, similar stories are playing out – a mate is killed or disappears. It is or would be extremely rare for one of our feathered friends just to up and decide they ‘had had enough’ and left a nest of babies. In this case, a male Swan in Boston MA has charge of his five goslings after their mother died on the nest right after they hatched. He is reported to be doing a superb job, too, even allowing them to ride on his back!

There has been a break and the nest has plenty of food back on it. Ringo really enjoyed a good feed and had a huge crop at the end of it, just like E22 did at SWFlorida today.

The ‘baby’ isn’t such a baby any more at Barry College. Missy still stays on the nest but doesn’t have to brood B16 tonight.

All of the eaglets on the nests are growing and growing and moving through each of the development stages just like they should be doing. The first of the Bald Eagles on streaming cams to hatch this year was Pearl and Tico at Superbeaks. Just look at these beauties. Pearl is 62 days old and Tico is now 61 days old. The average age of fledge in Florida is 77 days. After fledging, it I normal for the eaglets to return to the nest to be fed by the parents who will be teaching them to hunt prey as they strengthen their wings and enhance their flying skills. This period lasts for normally a month or five weeks (sometimes more). I am always very distressed when I see a fledgling shoot out of the nest and never return.

If you do not have your calendars marked, then please do. We are now six days away from the 15th of February which is pip watch for Jackie and Shadow. So far everything is going like clockwork. This adorable couple have kept the Crows at bay and protected those two precious eggs they have been incubating. I wonder if we are in for two ‘spirited’ eaglets this year?

Connick, the only eaglet of Clive and Connie at the Captiva Bald Eagle nest has a huge crop today, too…what is it with today? Every eaglet has been stuffed til they can hardly walk! I know what you are going to say…these ‘babies’ are now sporting their thermal down, the feedings are not so close together, and yes, they can hold a lot more food at a single feeding! And you would be absolutely correct.

At the KNF-E1 nest of Anna and Louis, they filled E-03 up to the brim too – right before the heavy rains came to the area.

Remember. E-03 will be named. You can vote beginning at noon on Friday the 10th (tomorrow) until Saturday at noon. Three names are selected by forestry staff and voted for on the chat. Head to KNF-E1 nest on YouTube. Wonder what the names will be this week?

Valentine and Nugget were soggy over at the E3 nest on Lake Kincaid. Andria makes an effort to keep her ‘big babies’ dry! After the rain settles, Alex is on the nest and it looks like Valentine was doing some self feeding.

Is this Alex or Andria? I am not sure.

Ever wondered what an eagle nest might smell like with the rain and all the fish bits and bobs? Oh, goodness. Just the thought.

Andria trying to keep those babies dry. Sweet Mum.

Alex and Valentine literally looking for a midnight snack.

It was pitching down the rain in Orange, Australia, too. Diamond before and after drying off. I have never seen Diamond so wet!!!!!!!

At The Campanile, Annie was in the scrape box – after what looks like a meal and then scraping and eating some stones. Oh, so nice to see you, Annie. When might we expect some eggs???

We knew we couldn’t call him ‘The New Guy’ forever. Cal Falcons seem to think Annie has decided that this one – albeit a slow learner about the prey gifts – is the one she will share her scrape box with. So there is going to be an opportunity coming up quickly to suggest names and vote. Cal Falcons tweeted the details on Twitter.

I received a note from ‘H’ and it appears that Zoe has missed two check ins. Send positive wishes for a transmission this evening!

Thank you so much for being with me today. It is always so nice to have you hear and to get your notes and comments. Please take care. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, photos, videos, announcements and streaming cams that help make up my blog: H, Geemeff, SWFlorida Eagles and D Pritchett, Red-tailed Hawk Tales, Achieva Credit Union, WRDC, Heidi Mc and the WRDC, MN-DNR, Inside Hook, The New York Times, LEXNAU and Matthew Wraifman, Paul White and the Webster, TX Eagle Watchers, Berry College Eagle Cam, Superbeaks, FOBBV, Window to Wildlife, KNF-E1 and KNF-E3, Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, and Cal Falcons.

Would you like to receive the blog in your inbox daily? You can sign up here and you can unsubscribe at any time. Your e-mail address is safe. No ads, no fees, no selling of e-mail addresses. Just a group of people who love raptors.

Superbeaks are Super…Tuesday Morning in Bird World

31 January 2022

If my father was alive today, it would be his birthday. So grateful for his love of the animals and birds that frequented our garden as a child and all the things he taught me.

It is still cold in Manitoba. We are still in the extreme cold warning but…it is only -21 C. Because of the strong winds it will be nearly -40 if you count in the chill factor and they are asking people to stay inside if it is possible. Cars do not like to start in cold weather like this. Some people have ‘plugs’ that heat the oil. The maker of my car will not install those nor the automatic starters so that you can let your car run and get warm before you go and jump in. And many of us, myself included, do not have garages having opted for larger garden spaces. So…it is cold out there. We bundle up in coats that are mid-calf and rated to -40. Boots are lined as well and there are all new materials to help keep people warm that are light weight. We manage. In fact, I function much better in the colder temperatures, like the eagles, than in the extreme heat that I loved as a younger person.


Making News:

It looks like Glen Blue 708 got tired of travelling and has decided it is beach life in Morocco for him!

The names of 2022’s year old Kakapo are coming in.

There appears to be ‘some hope’ for Annie and Grinnell’s Sequoia and Sasha.

Most of us outside of the UK don’t understand the ‘power’ behind the shooting estates that allow their gamekeepers to stomp on Goshawk chicks or shoot the Hen Harriers. Here is a good read.

Checking on Our Nests:

The new guy is definitely not a Grinnell and hardly an Alden. Not sure….

It is quite the snowy day for Jackie and Shadow at Big Bear. On occasion you can hear one or more of those cantankerous Crows/Ravens that have been coming to the nest and trying to distract the adults so that they can get to those precious eggs.

It has been hot in Florida. All of the eaglets have been panting today. Poor Connick when it got out of Connie’s shade, the wee one was huffing and puffing keeping cool. It was mid-afternoon and the little one with its clown feet and soft thermal down was panting really hard.

At 15:37 Connie gets Connick up to have some fish to hydrate itself.

As the sun sets on the barrier islands of Florida, it is a good thing to remember that the eagles actually ‘do better’ physically in the colder weather than in the extreme heat.

Teeny weeny Boots at the Webster Texas Bald Eagle nest is getting some fish. Ringo always eats first and then little Boots.

Most everyone watches and many report on Harriet and M15 so I don’t always – unless there is a big change and there was last evening. E21 and E22 slept alone in the nest together after having a tandem feeding by Mum and Dad.

In Louisiana, it was drizzling again on Monday with a 45% chance of rain, again.

Anna keeps little E03 dry. It is rather hard to imagine but E03 fit into that size of egg only 23 days ago.

Anna has found a new way to keep her baby dry.

At the E3 nest of Alex and Andria, Valentine is walking and getting steadier by the day.

Then little siblings say, ‘Hey, I can do that walking thing, too!’

Pa Berry and Missy could not be more proud. B16 is doing so well – the cutie pie Rollie Mollie is getting to that sort of ‘lanky’ stage. Still adorable. There are at least 3 rabbits on that nest if not 4 today.

We all hope that everyone of these little eaglets grows up to be big and strong like Pearl and Tico. What a pair these two are. I love the way they look at one another.

Tico takes a bow in front of Pearl as he ends his wingersizing display.

As the sun goes down in Central Florida, Muhlady is making sure that both Pearl and Tico are full to the brim before bed. I wonder if the parents begin to sense how much longer they have with their babies????

As the sun sets in St Petersburg, there are no eggs yet at the Achieva Osprey nest of Jack and Diane.

No eggs at Captiva for Mabel and Angus. They have been working on the rails today and keeping alert as there appear to be intruders in the area.

I still see only two eggs at the Moorings Park Osprey Platform in Naples, Florida this evening and around 2100. Will there be three when we wake up tomorrow morning? Believe me, I hope not.

The award for the most romantic of the birds today goes to L and GLY, the Royal Albatrosses! Goodness. Ranger Sharyn says that we might expect more frequent turn overs as it becomes difficult for the adults to find enough food for them and the chick so they are in and out, in and out. That little one is like doubling its weigh. Did anyone say ‘big boy’? Of course, I thought Lillibet was a big boy, too. So don’t trust me about genders of albatross!!!!!!!! That is a fact.

Thank you so very much for being with me this last day of January. February is short. Richmond’s Rosie should be returning from her migration around Valentine’s Day. Something to look forward to and then…5-6 weeks for UK Osprey arrivals…4 weeks til Big Red lays her first egg. Oh, lots to look forward to. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures and blog: Conservation without Borders, Kakapo Recover, HIT, San Jose City Hall, SK Hideaways and Cal Falcons, FOBBV, Window to Wildlife, Paul White and the Webster TX Eagle Cam Watchers, SWFlorida Eagles and D Pritchett, KNF-E1, KNF-E3, Berry College Eagle Cam, Superbeaks, Moorings Park Ospreys, NZ-DOC and Cornell, Elain and NZ DOC and Cornell.

News of SE30, Zoe is on the West Coast…Monday Morning in Bird World

30 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

I hope that you had a good weekend. Maybe you were able to go outside and see the birds. Perhaps you watched from your windows like I did with all our cold and wind. They bring us such joy and remember – if you are stressed out by anything just stop and visit with your local feathered friends or tune in to your favourite streaming cam.

It is pretty clear that Zoe has left Port Lincoln to start her independent life. WBSE30 is doing great in care, and there is a new Osprey streaming cam for you coming from Naples, Florida. So much happening and we are just getting ready to ramp up for eaglets fledging and osplets hatching! It will be a little crazy.

Making News:

Beautiful WBSE 30 is really thriving in rehab. Just look at how gorgeous she is (lighter bird in front). There are two separate and slightly different postings. Thanks, ‘H’ for alerting me to this!

There is a new Osprey nest!!!!!!!!!!

There is a new Osprey streaming cam in Naples, Florida. It is Harry and Sally and as of the 29th of January the couple have two eggs. Will there be a third tomorrow? The first was laid on the 24th at 0615 and the second on the 27th so tomorrow will be the day if there are to be three.

The EU Court has ruled that trapping finches in Malta is against the law and is not research. This is excellent news.

Did you know that until the middle of 2021 it was legal to trap songbirds in France with those inhumane sticky glue papers? This victory in France that made glue trapping illegal and the EU Court ruling on the Malta case is all good news. We cannot give up the fight to have our wildlife treated humanely. It takes time and effort but, they need us. And we need them!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jun/28/french-court-outlaws-glue-trap-hunting-of-songbirds?CMP=share_btn_link

Many groups trying to increase biodiversity in the UK and various nature and birding groups in North America are working hard to protect wetlands and, in some cases, to increase the amount of and number of wetlands so that our waterfowl can live. It is, thus, with some sadness that some of the few wetlands in the Middle East are drying up. Specialists in California say that even with the recent torrential rains and flooding, it might well not be enough to overcome the drought that threatens that State. What does all this mean for our wildlife?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/jan/29/death-in-the-marshes-environmental-calamity-hits-iraqs-unique-wetlands?CMP=share_btn_link

How much do you know about feathers? Are you aware that many vets around the world have feather collections – especially if they work with many raptors. Those feathers are used to replace lost primary and secondary feathers (as well as others) to injured birds. Feathers are invaluable and having a library collection of them is one way of helping birds to return to the wild.

An Indian woman, Esha Munshi, has started a feather library in India. It is the first in the country and will be used as a resource, not as a site for replacement feathers. Read about why this feather library is important in a world when species are going extinct.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/24/feather-library-visual-a-to-z-india-birds-aoe?CMP=share_btn_link


It is a strange morning, this Sunday, 29 January on the Canadian Prairies. Not only is it desperately cold at -32 C but, I also find myself thinking about Zoe, the fledgling Osprey from Port Lincoln. Zoe is not without controversy. The siblicide of both Little and Middle polarised many viewers. As one reader put it, ‘She is living for three’. She certainly is. I have received more letters about this single Osprey than all of the other raptors put together. So, I will say what collectively those that sent e-mails or made comments have said – I want Zoe to not only be the largest female osprey ever ringed in South Australia but, for the sake of her siblings, I want her to become the longest living osprey in the history of Australia. I want her to raise many chicks to fledge. Then it would have been all worth it.

It is pretty clear that Zoe flew north yesterday at 07:55:34 and left Port Lincoln for good. What motivates these fledglings to leave when they do? and why head in the direction that she did? Was it the winds? The water appeared to be rather choppy yesterday. We are awaiting an update from her sat-pal when Australia wakes up in several hours.

The nest is empty at Port Lincoln and Dad is having some quiet time in the shed. I have not seen an update on Zoe but will check for tomorrow!

Zoe is definitely not returning to the natal nest at the barge in Port Lincoln. This is her latest tracking:

Zoe has crossed the Eyre Peninsula flying across the inland where there would have been little or no opportunities for food. Incredible…Perhaps she knows a secret and it is faster to get to Mount Hope this way??? She is now on the West Coast which is a good place for Ospreys. Eat well, Zoe!

This is the posting by Friends of Osprey:


Connick has had a wonderful Sunday. There has been lots of good fish and he or she went to bed with a crop the size of a large golf ball. Connie has really stepped up the feedings and the little one is no longer covered in sticky fish juice. Such a little sweetheart.

You can see Connick’s ear. That lighter round circle on the side of the head below the eye. This ear will be covered with feathers.

I did almost choke when I saw the ‘something’ wrapped around Connick’s wing. My palms began to sweat but…is it nesting material? It looks like string to me. Whatever it is, it is off Connick’s wing and I hope it does not return.

Connick is growing. I have said like a ‘bad weed’ for several blogs now but, it is true. Once Connie got on to the feeding and did so with gusto, the little one just sprouted.

Much of the soft natal feathers is disappearing. We can see that thick Matty thermal down coming in on Connick’s nest and chest. And just look at those beautiful eyes and beak. We have come a long way from the little chick we worried over with fish juice everywhere.

Can you see that golf ball size crop? Connick has sported one after every feeding today it seems.

It didn’t start off raining in Louisiana. It was rather a nice day with Valentine and 02. We can see the difference in the juvenile feathers coming in. These two are adorable. Life on the KNF E3 nest is good. Alex and Andria have proven to be capable parents.

By noon the drops were starting to fall and the rain just got heavier. At the KNF-E3 nest Andria tried her hardest to keep Valentine and 02 dry but, to no avail. They are simply too big to fit under Mum!

The rain didn’t stop Alex from bringing in a fish for the family. Well done, Alex!

Oh, the nest of Anna and Louis KNF-E1 got really soggy, too.

Sunday was a beautiful day in central Florida. Pearl and Tico are growing so fast. They really have their juvenile feathers now and even though they can feed themselves, one of the parents seems to also like to still be with their eaglets. It is not long until they will fledge – Pearl is 53 days old and Tico is 52 days old. The average fledge age for Florida eagles is 77 days. It is hoped that the pair will spend another month at the nest getting fed and learning to hunt prey and getting their wings strong.

They are seriously gorgeous siblings. They have beautiful shiny ebony beaks, nice yellow lip surrounds, bright black eyes, and gorgeous ebony-espresso juvenile feathers. They are healthy. And they sure look happy!

As the sun sets over the nest, everyone has eaten. It was a good day.

At the Captiva Osprey nest, Mabel and Angus were on alert today. It is prime real estate. Hopefully there are no territorial battles for this young couple. No eggs as the sun set on Sunday.

No eggs at the Achieva Credit Union osprey platform in St Petersburg either. Jack and Diane were on and off the nest and at one time it appeared an intruder might have landed when they were away.

There can sometimes be strange creatures on the Southwest Florida Eagle nest that will be lunch. As we all know, Eagles do not waste anything and they often bring carrion (dead animals) to the nest such as road kill. Once last year M15 brought in a domestic cat. I do not know what is on the nest today on the right side!

‘A’ was right…both Es are sporting Mohawks today! Thanks for the heads up, ‘A’.

Shadow decided enough was enough and he wanted some incubation time with the precious eggs. So what does Shadow do?

As the approaching storm begins to get closer and closer and the winds were gusting, Jackie and Shadow get ready to hang tight.

The little eaglet, Boots, at the Webster TX Bald Eagle nest did get some prey today. I was quite worried. It seemed that Ringo – who is MUCH bigger – was the only one getting fed and little Boots was hunkered down in the nest not eating. But, Boots did get fed! Fantastic.

What do we think? A BIG sister and a ‘tiny’ little brother? Lots of fish on the nest and part of a Coot.

Here is the link to the discussion and talks that took place on the 26th with the Ventana Wildlife Society and the Condor Crew. There are currently 93 California Condors free flying. There has been one death this year. 5 January 2023 was the date that Wassak died from lead poisoning. The Ventana Wildlife Society supplies free lead-free ammunition to farmers and ranches in the Condor areas of California. Why then do they die of lead poisoning? It has to be so frustrating. Funds have been received for VWS to hire a position to further push information and free ammunition to stop these horrific deaths.

All of the nests appear to be doing well. We have the first Osprey eggs in Florida at the new Moorings Park nest in Naples. We are waiting for eggs for Captiva and Achieva. The first one should be laid at Achieva this week. All of the eaglets on the nest are doing well including little Boots where the pecking and plucking has stopped. Boots has some catching up to do and I know that we will all send good wishes his way for just that! Join me also in wishing Zoe a good and long life. Mum and Dad will now be able to get a much needed break and get back in shape for August/September and eggs!

Thank you so very much for joining me today. Please take care of yourselves. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures and blog: ‘H’, Raptor Recovery Australia, Moorings Park Osprey Nest Naples, FL, @Birdlife_Malta, The Guardian, Friends of Osprey, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Window to Wildlife, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, Superbeaks, Achieva Credit Union, SWFL Bald Eagles and D Pritchett, FOBBV, SK Hideawys and FOBBV, Paul White and the Webster Texas Eagle Watchers, and The Ventana Wildlife Society.

Remembering Sue and Otto intruders everywhere…Thursday in Bird World

26 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

I hope that the ‘almost’ end of the week is looking good for all of you.

Thank you for your notes about the kittens. They are doing great. There are times I wonder if I will survive! My entire house looks like a kitten day care!!!!!! They prefer boxes and paper shopping bags to any kind of toy from the pet store. They want to sleep in baskets with soft blankets, on top of tables with soft blankets, and in drawers. I am trying to remember to cut all those handles – and you should, too. They can get their necks through them. They have been playing with this bag for a couple of weeks now. Taking turns being inside and out. It is just about torn to shreds! Lewis always appears to be chewing on something and Missey is always a darling – oh, no, she never causes any mischief! Never! LOL.

In the News:

Sue and Otto are remembered. It is a lovely article about this adored pair of Red-tail Hawks. In it, I also note that they are giving different days for the birds death. I will try and confirm which is correct.

https://news.syr.edu/blog/2023/01/25/remembering-su-sue-and-otto-syracuse-universitys-resident-hawk-pair/.

A Place called Hope – one of my all-time favourite wildlife rehabilitation centres – is asking for help. Unusual donations. They want more specimens of raptors killed by rodenticide and lead. They are gathering evidence so that a bill can be passed in Connecticut to stop the sale of both rodenticides and lead. Do you work at a centre that can help? And even if you don’t, read the request. It is shocking how many deaths there are so quickly….we need to stop this, we need to help our raptors.

The faces of some of those affected and some who have died due to rat poison and lead.

The joy I felt at seeing Cattle Egrets, in the pastures and small allotments in Grenada following the goats and cows, is hard to describe. Imagine being a farmer in the UK, changing your way of doings things to bring health to your land, and now you have cattle egrets! Just imagine how thrilling – a sign of a healthy space.

The article below gives a good history of the cattle egret. It is a really good read while demonstrating that biodiversity can work if we make the effort to change our practice. “Numbers of cattle egrets are booming in Britain, boosted by wildlife-friendly farming where cows are grazed on gentle rotations designed to improve soil quality and boost invertebrate populations.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/25/cattle-egrets-uk-wildlife-friendly-farms-have-had-a-few?CMP=share_btn_link

In Melbourne, scientists are wondering if a change in climate is the cause for the rise of the ‘devil bird’ in Melbourne’s suburbs. If you live in Melbourne, have you seen one of these?

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/26/unusual-sightings-of-devil-bird-across-melbourne-raise-migration-mysteries-for-researchers?CMP=share_btn_link

We don’t get to see the Layman Albatross nesting on Kauai, Hawaii on streaming cams, only through the postings of Hob Osterlund. Thank you, Holly Parsons, for this re-post on the hatch of the little Moli.

A Sanibel eaglet that fell out of its nest now has been adopted and has its forever home. Congratulations!

In the Nests:

Louis and Anna’s little chick is doing fantastic. Oh, they had a soggy start to Wednesday after the storms pushed through the area but, everyone is fine.

Cody got the camera up and running at the E3 nest. Thank you Cody! You can really tell the difference between E01 and E03 now. E01 being the one with the most juvenile feathers. It feels like it happened overnight!

Just look at how well those eaglets are camouflaged in that nest. Both have serious crops from being well fed.

Coot is still on the menu. There must be an absolute abundance of Coots on Kincaid Lake this time of year.

02 is stretching its wings much to the curiosity of big sibling. They both have fuzzy Mohawks and you can see the feathers coming in along with those huge feet!

There is information on the chat roll for both KNF-E1 and KNF-E3 about naming 01 which I am presuming can only be Alex and Andria’s 01 chick from the E3 nest. “We will have a 24hour poll to name O1 on Friday the 27th starting at noon and ending on Saturday the 28th at noon. 3 names will be selected by local Forest Service employees then voted on in the chat.” Send in a name…give that little eaglet something to wear proudly all its life. Mark your calendars..this Friday til noon Saturday to come up with a great name. Then the 3 finalists.

It really was a scary time. On the 24th of January the Ravens came to the nest of Jackie and Shadow. Shadow came to the rescue. How terrifying for Jackie! The Eagles have to be constantly vigilant against Ravens and like Harriet and M15, the GHOs. Those Ravens know that Jackie has two precious eggs and they want them!

Here is another view of the threat by the Ravens.

Ranger Sharyn comes by and does a weight check on Sweet Pea. That is one of the nicknames that the South Plateau chick has at the moment. There will be a naming contest after the middle of February when all of the eggs have hatched. I wonder what the name will be? Names become important – they often help us to remember the birds easier than if they have a number. Scientific studies have also shown that our attachment to the wildlife/raptors/sea birds is more intense if they have a name. I am all for whatever it takes to help people care – and to help others to understand how important it is to care for these beautiful birds – all of them – before it is too late.

I am reposting one of Sharon Dunne’s screen captures of L and GLY together during the changeover. Just a gorgeous couple. Thank you, Sharon.

‘A’ sent me the link to this video capturing the moment that GLY sees his chick for the first time. Thanks, A!

The feedings for CE9 continue to go well. The little eaglet has responded in kind by growing and growing! CE9 is sweetness in a tiny bundle. So glad this little one is thriving.

Oh, sweetness in a food coma.

At 12:47:21 Clive feeds Connie and Connie feeds CE9. Precious. CE9 just wants lunch not fooling around parents!!!!!! This little eaglet will have its name today!!!!!! Wonder what it will be?

The last meal of the day at Captiva as the sun sets.