Injury updates, visits, and intruders and more

5 August 2022

This is just a quick evening report. There is some news that you might not have seen.

Here goes. Isn’t L4 handsome? There has been an update on L4, Big Red and Arthur’s youngest and it is good news. A soft tissue injury. He should be up and about in a few weeks if all goes well. Here is the announcement from the Janet Swanson Wildlife Hospital.

My beef continues to be that Cornell is a leader in the study of Birds. They should have the best anti- bird strike buildings in North America! By doing that, Big Red and Arthur’s fledglings would have less fatalities and injuries.

SF Ospreys has posted a video of Brooks’ visit yesterday.

The ospreys at the Mispillion Harbour Osprey Platform do not visit nearly as frequently as they did even a week ago. Nevertheless, Dad was on the nest and defended it valiantly against another Osprey interloper today. Thanks ‘H’ for the head’s up!

Later there was a parent with a fish on the perch and one of the fledglings visiting the nest.

There will be no word about the Poole Harbour Osprey Nest until tomorrow. Everyone is hoping to see the family back on the nest after the Goshawk attack.

The Pitkin County Trails Osplet that was pulled off the nest (its sibling died) when Mum was tangled in monofilament line continues to do well in care.

Want to see more images of Little Bit 17? Then go to the Notre Dame Eagles FB page. There is a clear video. It is THE place to get the latest news on our beloved fledgling.

This is a capture of 17 from a video that Doreen Taylor posted. Thank you Doreen for your images of Little Bit. 17 is looking very well, indeed! I like the crop that is storing some food. So proud of you, 17. We always knew that you were a resilient survivor if given the chance. Thanks Humane Indiana Wildlife.

Beautiful Lindsay has been napping on the ledge near the scrape at The Campanile on the campus of UC-Berkeley. So nice to see you, Lindsay!

A friend just sent me the following article. Ireland has been working with Norway to translocate White-tailed Eagles back into their country. The first release was in 2006. The second was today! Thanks, ‘R’. Here is the article.

https://www.rte.ie/news/munster/2022/0805/1314119-eagle-chicks-release/

Thank you for stopping in. There is not a lot happening in Bird World but it seems it is dramatic when it does. Lots of intruders about. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their postings, videos, or streaming cams where I took my images: Notre Dame Eagles FB, SF Bay and Golden Gate Audubon, Cornell Hawk Chatters, and Mispillion Harbour Ospreys and the DDNR and Cal Falcons FB. Thank you to Doreen Taylor and the Notre-Dame Eagles. I used their image of Little Bit as the cover photo.

Saturday in Bird World

If you have been reading my blog regularly, you will know that I am tracking the Port Lincoln Osprey lads in terms of ‘who is on the nest’. Ervie and Falky have been alternating. Ervie spent the afternoon and evening and slept on the nest. He is on there right now.

Ervie is fish calling to Dad.

Bazza has been shut out and yesterday he attacked Ervie when Ervie was on the nest. If you missed it, here is that dust up.

We are on hatch watch this weekend for three Bald Eagle nests. That is Captiva, Kistachie National Forest, and Berry College. The eggs for both Captiva and KNF were laid on 4 Dec and 7 December. One of the KNF eggs was broken. Eggs at Berry College were laid on 5 Dec and 8 December. You might remember that it was the female at Berry College, Missey, that survived that horrific hail and wind storm. I hope those eggs are alright. This is a new female for Pa Berry – their second season together. If you were a fan of Ma Berry, she was seen having a spa day at the end of January 2021. Yes, birds do get divorces.

This is the Kisatchie National Forest nest of Anna and Louis. Anna is incubating now.

Here is the link to the KNF Bald Eagle Nest.

This is the Berry College Bald Eagle Nest.

Here is the link to the Berry College streaming cam:

https://www.berry.edu/eaglecam/

This is the link to the Captiva Nest. This is Connie and Clive. I hope that they have a very successful year. This is probably the most narrow Bald Eagle Nest in the world!

R1 and R2 at the WRDC nest are doing just fine. Rita did some clearing of the nest yesterday and some new grasses were brought in. The nest looked amazing but after several hours, little eaglets wandering around and food can cause it to look messy again. Rita used the grass to go to the edges and sticks are still being brought in to this new human made nest for the sides.

Little eaglets full to the brim. The weather is good. It is 24 degrees. They do not need Rita to brood them in that temperature.

Ferris Akel is streaming live as I type. I love to lurk because he finds some amazing birds on his Saturday tours of the Finger Lakes area of Upper New York State. So far today there have been lots of hawks – Northern Harriers and Red Tails. The Harriers are really difficult to photograph.

The Ducks below are American Black Ducks, females. They might look like Mallards but their bill is tinged more green than the orange of the Mallard and their feathers are darker. They are virtually the same size and shape of a Mallard.

This is a female Hooded Meganser looking for food – going in and out of the water flapping her wings.

There you can get a good look. This looks to me like a first year female. Mergansers like to live in forested swamps but today they are in the wetlands. They nest in tree cavities and will also use nest boxes, unlike our favourite little duck, Daisy! They winter in the estuaries and creeks in the eastern United States and along the Mississippi Flyway.

Ferris found a Red-tail hawk hoping to find some lunch. Many of the Red-tail Hawks around the area of Ithaca do not migrate but remain in the region because the winters are not too harsh and there is plenty of prey. Indeed, the one thing that does determine over winter areas is the availability of food.

There continue to be lots of Canada Geese in the Finger Lakes region of NY.

Today, there were also some swans.

Swans feed by submerging their heads into the vegetation below the surface of the water.

These are young Tundra Swans with an adult. The Tundra Swans are smaller than the Trumpeter.

Aren’t they beautiful? We have so many waterfowl in Canada but it was not until Daisy the Duck in Australia that I really began to appreciate the ones around me.

There were also Mallards and Redheads mixed in with the Tundra Swans who are searching for vegetation to eat.

Just look at all of the Redheads!

The GHOWs are becoming a real problem for the health of the Bald Eagles. There was another owl strike at the SWFlorida Bald Eagle Nest of Harriet and M15. Lady Hawk has it on video. Additionally, there are GHOWs attempting to take over the Minnesota DNR Bald Eagle nest of Harry and Nancy, the Savannah Osprey Nest, and, as we know, a GHOW named Bonnie and Clyde took over the nest of a young Bald Eagle couple in Newton, Kansas last year and raised two owlets to fledge.

I am beginning to not like GHOWs at all!

The temperatures on the Canadian Prairies warmed up and we got more snow! It can stop now. The birds have already been fed and it looks like a great day to stay in and read and watch for those pips.

Over the past month I have become very fond of DanniConnorWild. She is a young wildlife photographer who has taken up residence in Northern Sweden. She is living her dream. That is fantastic! She is very keen on squirrels. Indeed, the squirrels in this video are eating spruce cones. I have never seen this. She is earning a living through her videos and photographs so there are ads but, just don’t mind those. I am posting her video from the end of the year that includes squirrels, Reindeer, and beautiful Northern Lights in case you want to have a look.

Thank you for joining me today. It is so nice to have you with me. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Ferris Akel Tours, Port Lincoln Osprey, Captiva Bald Eagle Cam, Berry College Eagle Cam, KNF Bald Eagle Cam, and the WRDC Bald Eagle Cam.