Name the Eagle, Connick’s Crop Popping, and the Es eat…Friday in Bird World

3 February 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

Remember to head over to the streaming cam of Kistachie National Forest Bald Eagle Nest E3 to vote on 02’s name! Here are the choices…let’s make sure little one gets a great name!

I saw this and simply had to share it with everyone. Or maybe it isn’t that funny. I do love Condor humour!

Making News:

Little Boots is 20 days old today. He looks so young. With good care and good food, he will catch up we hope.

Just look at that sweet face. Little Boots is in care. As everyone noticed, he was extremely weak in the nest. Let us hope that he can be stabilised and that apparent feet and leg deformities can be repaired by the loving folks down in Houston at the Wildlife Center of Texas.

Here is the posting. I would like to draw your attention to “nest cam footage showed him to be struggling to sit up and move around in the nest, impairing his chances for survival.” There is the perfect wording to get help for an eagle on a nest that is not thriving. I am impressed. Nothing caused by a human just good old compassion and perhaps some monofilament line in that egg cup.

If you are interesting in donating for little Boots care, please do so. Here is the information. I went on line and went to their website: Wildlife Centre of Texas. It was quick and easy. Go Boots!

A British Columbia juvenile Bald Eagle got itself into some mischief and is being flown to OWL.

Continuing with the issues raised in the movie The Albatross, young people are doing amazing drawings. Will this make them better environmental citizens? How many of us can take a pledge to stop using plastic? Let’s try it. Maybe it will catch on like a bad cold.

‘A’ wondered what it would take to get rid of those plastic gyros in the oceans. Certainly people have tried various methods. And we know from The Flight of the Osprey that countries are having a hard time dealing with plastic…so, let’s just not buy anything with plastic. Do it a day at a time. It is frightening what we have done with our oceans. I remember when I first moved to Southern Manitoba eons ago and I wanted to purchase a cream separator. People laughed. They were hard to clean and they just shoved them down the river bank. I kid you not. Out of sight, out of mind — like the oceans.

In my province, groups are joining forces around Brandon to build nesting boxes for Bluebirds! Wow. What a great idea.

Some of you will remember that the adult Ospreys were chased off their platform at the Cape Henlopen State Park last year. The male was killed. The female appears, from the announcement, to be alive. The three osplets starved to death on the nest in front of viewers and were carried off by the intruders. It was a tragedy that tore our hearts out. Well, there is a new platform going up!

And yet another story about lead poisoning. Seriously lead is something that could happen rather quickly if there was a will. Continue to lobby everyone you can. Take 15 minutes or 30 minutes one day and send an e-mail to your elected officials. Get others to join in. Tell them no more lead. And how about adding plastic to that, too?

Now something to give us hope. A good news story about a Bald Eagle in rehab for 6 months being released. YES!

Zoe continues to explore the area around Mt Hope. She has also started heading south…will she return to the barge? That would be a bit crazy. Let us all hope she is finding her wings and some fish!

Checking on the nests:

I do not see any Osprey eggs at either Achieva or Captiva on Thursday.

At the Captiva Eagle nest, little Connick is such a darling.

Oh, just look at these later images. Connick really likes to spread out and sleep….and two proud parents!

What a great image of the three – Clive, Connie, and Connick.

At 16:55 Connick had a huge crop!

It looks like the parents are smiling at Connick with his almost ready to pop crop. Their baby has grown and thrived.

There must be a fishing contest at the lake near Superbeaks. It is only mid-afternoon and PePe has brought in 8 fish! Yes, you read that correctly. 8 fish to the nest for Pearl and Tico (and of course, the rest of the family, Mum Muhlady). PePe you better eat some of these fish if you aren’t eating the heads!

It’s a gorgeous day out in California at Jackie and Shadow’s nest. The question of the day was: What was the name of Jackie’s former mate? Do you know? It was Mr B. Shadow landed on the nest and wanted the nest and Jackie and wouldn’t leave — Shadow got them both! That was 2018 after Jackie and Mr B’s fledgling, Stormy, had flown. The three of them could not persuade Shadow to leave…oh, you gotta love this guy.

Do you realise that pip watch will begin on 15 February? That is only 12 days away!!!!!!!!!!!

Are Harriet and M15 moving E21 and 22 into another phase of training to be an independent eagle? No good food left on the nest just what looks to be pieces of a dried up catfish. 22 was pecking on that. Then sadly, 22 got up to the table first with 21 moving up and 22 went into submission. Things seem terribly wrong on this nest but, it is Harriet and M15. They are pros and they want their eaglets to thrive. So are we to think of this lack of food and little pieces as a teaching moment? Not every day will see a full crop. But, let’s do keep an eye. It is worrying a lot of people.

You can see the primary feathers coming in on that outstretched wing. Note the milky transparent tube – the quill – that holds the blood feather. One of the reasons that eaglets preen so much is to release the feather from that transparent quill.

Now we all know that 22 is a bit of a stinker…let’s watch and see what Harriet and M15 do tomorrow. Certainly no peace today and 22 was crying for food and hoping to get some that M15 brought in. In fact, every time that 22 even tried to eat that old dried fish, 21 started beaking its younger sibling. 22 is quick to go into submission. So what has set 21 off? Is it the lack of food on the nest? Again, let us see what tomorrow brings. Harriet has never lost an eaglet. Never. In fact, there could be a windfall of food on the nest tomorrow – just like there is in the wild – some days there is too much food and for many others, nothing.

Ah, there is food this morning, Friday. Both Es have a crop. 21 ate first with 22 in submission and then 22 was fed and had a nice crop. Let us all take a big sigh of relief.

Lady Hawk caught 22 walking Thursday – hey, a giant step!

Gabby and V3 are a gorgeous couple. 18:24 Thursday evening on the nest together.

And last another Canadian story but not about Bluebirds this time…it is from David Hancock and the Surrey Bald Eagle Nest. Two new bonded eagles working with a meal and a stick. Have another laugh as we wait to hear how Boots is doing.

Thank you so much for being with me today. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, posts, tweets, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: ‘A’ Sherri van Syckel and California Condor Recovery Group, KNF, Wildlife Centre of Texas, Heather Simms and the Webster Texas Eagle Watchers, Terry Carman and the Bald Eagle Live Nest Cams and News, Joyce Hartmann and the Agreement on the Conservation of Albatross and Petrels, Brandon Sun, Friends of Cape Henlopen State Park, MLive.com, JET/FOX/YourErie, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Achieva Credit Union, Window to Wildlife, Superbeaks, FOBBV, SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, Lady Hawk and SWFL Eagles and D Pritchett, NEFL Bald Eagles and the AEF, and the Dave Hancock Wildlife Foundation.

News of SE30, Zoe is on the West Coast…Monday Morning in Bird World

30 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

I hope that you had a good weekend. Maybe you were able to go outside and see the birds. Perhaps you watched from your windows like I did with all our cold and wind. They bring us such joy and remember – if you are stressed out by anything just stop and visit with your local feathered friends or tune in to your favourite streaming cam.

It is pretty clear that Zoe has left Port Lincoln to start her independent life. WBSE30 is doing great in care, and there is a new Osprey streaming cam for you coming from Naples, Florida. So much happening and we are just getting ready to ramp up for eaglets fledging and osplets hatching! It will be a little crazy.

Making News:

Beautiful WBSE 30 is really thriving in rehab. Just look at how gorgeous she is (lighter bird in front). There are two separate and slightly different postings. Thanks, ‘H’ for alerting me to this!

There is a new Osprey nest!!!!!!!!!!

There is a new Osprey streaming cam in Naples, Florida. It is Harry and Sally and as of the 29th of January the couple have two eggs. Will there be a third tomorrow? The first was laid on the 24th at 0615 and the second on the 27th so tomorrow will be the day if there are to be three.

The EU Court has ruled that trapping finches in Malta is against the law and is not research. This is excellent news.

Did you know that until the middle of 2021 it was legal to trap songbirds in France with those inhumane sticky glue papers? This victory in France that made glue trapping illegal and the EU Court ruling on the Malta case is all good news. We cannot give up the fight to have our wildlife treated humanely. It takes time and effort but, they need us. And we need them!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jun/28/french-court-outlaws-glue-trap-hunting-of-songbirds?CMP=share_btn_link

Many groups trying to increase biodiversity in the UK and various nature and birding groups in North America are working hard to protect wetlands and, in some cases, to increase the amount of and number of wetlands so that our waterfowl can live. It is, thus, with some sadness that some of the few wetlands in the Middle East are drying up. Specialists in California say that even with the recent torrential rains and flooding, it might well not be enough to overcome the drought that threatens that State. What does all this mean for our wildlife?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2023/jan/29/death-in-the-marshes-environmental-calamity-hits-iraqs-unique-wetlands?CMP=share_btn_link

How much do you know about feathers? Are you aware that many vets around the world have feather collections – especially if they work with many raptors. Those feathers are used to replace lost primary and secondary feathers (as well as others) to injured birds. Feathers are invaluable and having a library collection of them is one way of helping birds to return to the wild.

An Indian woman, Esha Munshi, has started a feather library in India. It is the first in the country and will be used as a resource, not as a site for replacement feathers. Read about why this feather library is important in a world when species are going extinct.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/24/feather-library-visual-a-to-z-india-birds-aoe?CMP=share_btn_link


It is a strange morning, this Sunday, 29 January on the Canadian Prairies. Not only is it desperately cold at -32 C but, I also find myself thinking about Zoe, the fledgling Osprey from Port Lincoln. Zoe is not without controversy. The siblicide of both Little and Middle polarised many viewers. As one reader put it, ‘She is living for three’. She certainly is. I have received more letters about this single Osprey than all of the other raptors put together. So, I will say what collectively those that sent e-mails or made comments have said – I want Zoe to not only be the largest female osprey ever ringed in South Australia but, for the sake of her siblings, I want her to become the longest living osprey in the history of Australia. I want her to raise many chicks to fledge. Then it would have been all worth it.

It is pretty clear that Zoe flew north yesterday at 07:55:34 and left Port Lincoln for good. What motivates these fledglings to leave when they do? and why head in the direction that she did? Was it the winds? The water appeared to be rather choppy yesterday. We are awaiting an update from her sat-pal when Australia wakes up in several hours.

The nest is empty at Port Lincoln and Dad is having some quiet time in the shed. I have not seen an update on Zoe but will check for tomorrow!

Zoe is definitely not returning to the natal nest at the barge in Port Lincoln. This is her latest tracking:

Zoe has crossed the Eyre Peninsula flying across the inland where there would have been little or no opportunities for food. Incredible…Perhaps she knows a secret and it is faster to get to Mount Hope this way??? She is now on the West Coast which is a good place for Ospreys. Eat well, Zoe!

This is the posting by Friends of Osprey:


Connick has had a wonderful Sunday. There has been lots of good fish and he or she went to bed with a crop the size of a large golf ball. Connie has really stepped up the feedings and the little one is no longer covered in sticky fish juice. Such a little sweetheart.

You can see Connick’s ear. That lighter round circle on the side of the head below the eye. This ear will be covered with feathers.

I did almost choke when I saw the ‘something’ wrapped around Connick’s wing. My palms began to sweat but…is it nesting material? It looks like string to me. Whatever it is, it is off Connick’s wing and I hope it does not return.

Connick is growing. I have said like a ‘bad weed’ for several blogs now but, it is true. Once Connie got on to the feeding and did so with gusto, the little one just sprouted.

Much of the soft natal feathers is disappearing. We can see that thick Matty thermal down coming in on Connick’s nest and chest. And just look at those beautiful eyes and beak. We have come a long way from the little chick we worried over with fish juice everywhere.

Can you see that golf ball size crop? Connick has sported one after every feeding today it seems.

It didn’t start off raining in Louisiana. It was rather a nice day with Valentine and 02. We can see the difference in the juvenile feathers coming in. These two are adorable. Life on the KNF E3 nest is good. Alex and Andria have proven to be capable parents.

By noon the drops were starting to fall and the rain just got heavier. At the KNF-E3 nest Andria tried her hardest to keep Valentine and 02 dry but, to no avail. They are simply too big to fit under Mum!

The rain didn’t stop Alex from bringing in a fish for the family. Well done, Alex!

Oh, the nest of Anna and Louis KNF-E1 got really soggy, too.

Sunday was a beautiful day in central Florida. Pearl and Tico are growing so fast. They really have their juvenile feathers now and even though they can feed themselves, one of the parents seems to also like to still be with their eaglets. It is not long until they will fledge – Pearl is 53 days old and Tico is 52 days old. The average fledge age for Florida eagles is 77 days. It is hoped that the pair will spend another month at the nest getting fed and learning to hunt prey and getting their wings strong.

They are seriously gorgeous siblings. They have beautiful shiny ebony beaks, nice yellow lip surrounds, bright black eyes, and gorgeous ebony-espresso juvenile feathers. They are healthy. And they sure look happy!

As the sun sets over the nest, everyone has eaten. It was a good day.

At the Captiva Osprey nest, Mabel and Angus were on alert today. It is prime real estate. Hopefully there are no territorial battles for this young couple. No eggs as the sun set on Sunday.

No eggs at the Achieva Credit Union osprey platform in St Petersburg either. Jack and Diane were on and off the nest and at one time it appeared an intruder might have landed when they were away.

There can sometimes be strange creatures on the Southwest Florida Eagle nest that will be lunch. As we all know, Eagles do not waste anything and they often bring carrion (dead animals) to the nest such as road kill. Once last year M15 brought in a domestic cat. I do not know what is on the nest today on the right side!

‘A’ was right…both Es are sporting Mohawks today! Thanks for the heads up, ‘A’.

Shadow decided enough was enough and he wanted some incubation time with the precious eggs. So what does Shadow do?

As the approaching storm begins to get closer and closer and the winds were gusting, Jackie and Shadow get ready to hang tight.

The little eaglet, Boots, at the Webster TX Bald Eagle nest did get some prey today. I was quite worried. It seemed that Ringo – who is MUCH bigger – was the only one getting fed and little Boots was hunkered down in the nest not eating. But, Boots did get fed! Fantastic.

What do we think? A BIG sister and a ‘tiny’ little brother? Lots of fish on the nest and part of a Coot.

Here is the link to the discussion and talks that took place on the 26th with the Ventana Wildlife Society and the Condor Crew. There are currently 93 California Condors free flying. There has been one death this year. 5 January 2023 was the date that Wassak died from lead poisoning. The Ventana Wildlife Society supplies free lead-free ammunition to farmers and ranches in the Condor areas of California. Why then do they die of lead poisoning? It has to be so frustrating. Funds have been received for VWS to hire a position to further push information and free ammunition to stop these horrific deaths.

All of the nests appear to be doing well. We have the first Osprey eggs in Florida at the new Moorings Park nest in Naples. We are waiting for eggs for Captiva and Achieva. The first one should be laid at Achieva this week. All of the eaglets on the nest are doing well including little Boots where the pecking and plucking has stopped. Boots has some catching up to do and I know that we will all send good wishes his way for just that! Join me also in wishing Zoe a good and long life. Mum and Dad will now be able to get a much needed break and get back in shape for August/September and eggs!

Thank you so very much for joining me today. Please take care of yourselves. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their tweets, posts, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures and blog: ‘H’, Raptor Recovery Australia, Moorings Park Osprey Nest Naples, FL, @Birdlife_Malta, The Guardian, Friends of Osprey, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Window to Wildlife, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, Superbeaks, Achieva Credit Union, SWFL Bald Eagles and D Pritchett, FOBBV, SK Hideawys and FOBBV, Paul White and the Webster Texas Eagle Watchers, and The Ventana Wildlife Society.

Will KNF-E3 01 be Valentine or Trey?…Osprey memories…Saturday in Bird World

28 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone.

It is 2230 on a Friday night on the Canadian Prairies and it is -24 C with a wind speed of 13 kph. A little breezy. Temperatures are set to fall to -30 Saturday with an extreme cold warning due to wind chills which will go below -40. They are warning us not to be outside if it is not absolutely necessary. Many of you, especially in Australia, are at the opposite end with high heat. Everyone, please take care, wherever you are.

As of Saturday morning at 10:33, 230 votes have been cast for little KNF-E3 01. Of those 49% favour Valentine and 39% voted for Trey. There is still time but it looks like this baby could be Valentine.

A Trip down Memory Lane:

Every once in awhile I like to mix things up and a video posted today on FB reminded me of a very special Osprey, Blue 5F Seren. We are still in Bald Eagle season in the US waiting for the two Osprey nests in Florida – Achieva and Captiva – to have eggs. The Ospreys will be packing their bags in Africa soon to return to the UK and Europe. Some are not as familiar with the UK Osprey nests so I thought, before the season starts, that it would be good to introduce you to the nests and the adults that we expect will be returning in late March or early April. I hope to dig into the archives on Saturday and again on a weekday. I hope that you are amused and learn something. I will work my way through four nests that are on streaming cams in Wales: Llyn Clywedog, Glaslyn, Dfyi, and Llyn Brenig – in no particular order. There are now 7 ‘known’ pairs of Ospreys breeding in Wales. In 2022 they produced 17 chicks. If you take the 14 adults and the 17 chicks, that means 31 Ospreys of ‘known’ origins in Wales. There are others, unringed. It is not certain how many of these unattached birds there are OR unknown nests. What is known that at least 5 of the chicks fledged from Llyn Clywedog have returned. They are KS7 (2018), KS8 (2018), KA7 (2019), 550 (2020), and 551 (2020). That is marvellous. All of those returnees are Dylan’s chicks either with Delete his mate from 2016 through 2019 or with 5F Seren.

Here is the hatching chart for Llyn Clywedog thanks to John Williams.

We are going to start with a hilarious video from the nest Llyn Clywedog in the Hafren Forest off. Blue 5F Seren’s first chick is hatching. Seren was not young when she bonded with Dylan. She hatched in Rutland in 2012, making her 8 years old. She had spent some time at the Pont Cresor platoform where she was courted by Aran, had a nest, laid eggs and then Aran would go back to Mrs G. This is how John William’s puts it in his blog about the ospreys of Llyn Clywedog:

In 2018 she formed a polygamous pairing with the male from the Glaslyn nest Aran. She laid 3 eggs in the Pont Croeso nest unfortunately the male concentrated his efforts on providing for his main nest and didn’t feed 5F at all. So she had to hunt for her self which left her eggs exposed to predators, and the elements. Unfortunately these eggs failed to hatch. Last year she spent a lot of time with the young Dyfi male Tegid (ZI) also at the Pont Croeso (near Glaslyn) nest. It was thought that they may of returned there in 2020 and attempt to breed there. But 5F had other plans.

Some say Mrs G sent her packing in 2020. Others see it as a big relief when she left the Glaslyn/Pont Cresor nests and made her way to Llyn Clywedog and Dylan. I adore her. Dylan is unringed. He ousted the much loved Dai Dot to take over as the male at the Llyn Clywedog nest in 2016. Dai Dot was extremely popular and it was unclear if Dylan would be popular but, he has turned out to be a very interesting male chasing intruders off as far as 25 miles and then stopping to fish for Brown Trout to take back to the nest (figured out by John Williams over the last few years by driving and watching).

Seren Blue 5F was seen yesterday in her usual spot, in nice form, in The Gambia, eating a fish. Indeed, she has been photographed most of the winter. She leaves Wales and lands on her favourite tree in Africa. How marvellous is that. We will look forward to her return. She is a much loved Welsh female who has now raised 7 chicks in three years.

When you watch the video imagine that Seren has laid eggs but, of course, they never hatched. Here is that video:

In this next video, Dylan will arrive with a fish after seeing his first chick for the first time. Strong little one. Ready to eat. Did I saw that all three of these chicks will fledge. Quite an accomplishment!

All three hatched and Dylan and Seren are tandem feeding. Three osplets is a handful. They were all males: 550 weighed 1250 grams at ringing; 551 weighed 1350 grams and 552 weighed 1450 grams. All fledged.

In 2021 only one of three eggs hatched. It was a male, Blue 496 (quite the character) weighing 1400 grams at ringing. Also fledged. In 2022, Seren and Dylan further fledged three very healthy chicks. This is the information on their numbers, gender, and weight: 553 Is female weighing 1710g at 40 days old; 554 is Male weighing 1485g (40 days old); and 555 is also male weighing 1410g (37 days old).

Oh, it will not be long until all of the Ospreys begin their migration from Africa and the Iberian peninsula to the UK and Europe. I cannot wait! Now that I have said that at least twice today, I know you know I am excited. Here is a beautiful sunset from Friday at the Chesapeake Osprey Conservancy in the US.

In the Mail:

‘L’ sent another news story about the adoption of Sanibel on US National Save the Eagles Day. Thank you ‘L’. It is always wonderful to hear good news and an eagle who cannot be released getting a special home.

Nest News:

The eaglets at the KNF-E3 nest of Alex and Andria are adorable. Alex flew in with a fish around noon and 02 got the first bites. 01 already had a big crop and hung back. 02 remains the ‘king’ of snatch and grab and got those first bites that 01 thought were theirs.

Voting for KNF-E3 01’s name is ongoing until noon Saturday. Three choices are Valentine for the Valentine Lake Trail, Trey who is the husband of Lucy Lewis, the Forestry Supervisor since 2017, and I am not sure about the connection of Tercel to the area. I associate Tercel with falcons or third hatches. There must be a local connection! I will continue exploring. Valentine is currently in the lead. We will know tomorrow at noon. Next week there will be the naming of 02. It really is exciting to be part of chasing what they will be called. I would love to be a little fly on the wall listening as to how they come up with the 3 choices.

Alex arrived with a fish and fed the eaglets til they just about popped.

At the end of Alex’s feeding, both eaglets are so full that they can hardly move.

Food coma!!!!!!!

Adorable.

All is well over at the nest of Anna and Louis where there is a single little butterball growing and growing and growing.

Did something happen at the Captiva Bald Eagle nest? Just look at the clown feet on Connick! No, no, no. There are hardly any fuzzy little eaglets left!!!!!!

Natal down is coming in and there is a cute little tail. If you look carefully, the beginnings of the feathers. I know…it seems like Connick just hatched yesterday!

Oh, that little Berry College eaglet of Pa and Missy is the cutest thing. Still soft and fuzzy. They have to develop quickly but it just seems like it is overnight and the wee ones are getting feathers.

Ron and Rose are the cutest eagle couple. Ron came in with a nice headless fish for Rose…they are so sweet together. It is so funny to see Ron in the nest cup all the time.

Ron always looks like he is smiling!

HeidiMc caught Ron and Rose with a bit of a controversy over stick placement. Too funny. Reminds me of Shadow with his sticks and the SWFlorida nest from M15 wants Harriet to shift.

It is a beautiful day today at the Achieva Osprey nest in St Petersburg. Both of the ospreys have been around. No eggs yet.

That early morning sun is just gorgeous. It paints the nest a perfect rose gold. Diane is beautiful.

In Australia, Indigo is still around. He has been heard in the evening and morning but has not been to the scrape. Indigo is likely catching his own prey now. Mum and Dad enjoying some quiet moments together.

After the attacks by the Corvids, Jackie and Shadow are taking no chances. Check out this perfect swap over caught by SK Hideaways.

A quiet moment looking at the precious eggs.

Shadow has been doing a great job relieving Jackie so she can have a break. Sometimes Jackie just doesn’t want to get up and go! Having seen raptors do amazing stretches after incubating or brooding for long periods of time, they must get stiff just like we do.

Both eaglets at Superbeaks are flapping their wings and self-feeding. The adults continue to feed them as well and no one is going hungry, not even for a second on this nest in Central Florida.

There are very few natal down dandelions left on the eaglets. They are almost completely covered with beautiful ebony/espresso juvenile feathers.

Another feeding after the IR camera clicks in.

And last here is a link to the page that will take you to January’s Monthly Condor Zoom Chat by the Ventana Wildlife Society.

https://www.ventanaws.org/zoom-chats.html

Thank you so very much for being with us today. Please take care. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, videos, posts, announcements, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: ‘L’, Llyn Clywedog and John Williams, CarnyxWild, Chesapeake Conservancy and Explore.org, Virginia Zoo, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, Window To Wildlife, Berry College Bald Eagle Cam, WRDC, HeidiMc and the WRDC, Achieva Credit Union, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, SK Hideaways and FOBBV, FOBBV, Superbeaks, and Ventana Wildlife Society.

If you would like to receive my blog daily, please subscribe. You can unsubscribe at any time. No ads, no fees, just a community of people that love raptors – and other bird species – that want to make our planet a better place for them.

Ervie enjoys a festival, Annie gets treats…Friday in Bird World

27 January 2022

Good Morning Everyone,

It is late Thursday and snow is falling gently in the garden. Everyone on the Canadian Prairies is preparing themselves for the Polar Vortex that is set to arrive sometime Friday evening. It will keep us in very frigid temperatures for about a fortnight. So tonight it is -7 but it will be dipping down to -24 C tomorrow with strong winds, then into the -30s. I will be fine but this has to be a shock to the birds outside. There were more than 40 Starlings today at the feeders along with about 60 or more Sparrows. The squirrels were out as well eating as much as they could. It has to be so difficult for them.

The kittens are, of course, fine. Lewis likes to snuggle in with all the textiles in a drawer and Missy is drawn to sleeping in large plant pots. At times these are the strangest kittens I have ever had the privilege to share my life with. They are adorable characters!


In the Mailbox:

A request has come in to remind everyone that if they have Dark-Eyed Juncos visiting their gardens to please put seed, particularly Millet, on the ground for them. They are ground feeders! Thank you.

Making News:

There is news coming of Ervie from Fran Solly and Friends of Osprey. I haven’t seen a tracking for Ervie for awhile so this was such a treat. There is apparently a big festival with helicopter rides where he normally fishes so he went some where else to get his meals but, Fran notes that he also hung around to watch some of the people at the festivities. Relief.

Some people are just discovering how beneficial birdwatching is to human health!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/jan/27/birdsong-boosts-mental-wellbeing-for-90-of-people-uk-poll-finds?CMP=share_btn_link

Great news coming out of University of California at Berkeley. Drones are banned from the campus area where Annie raises her family. Thank you so much!

Denial, watering-down terms to make horrific acts like stomping five Goshawk chicks to death palatable. When will it stop? When will people come to their senses that the persecution of raptors is not OK.

Kakapo that went into care have responded positively and will soon be returning home. Great news.

The tiny eaglet that was found with some puncture wounds at the base of its nest tree has responded well to the treatment given by CROW. The sad news is that the nest where it was to be returned has been taken over by GHOs. (Did those owls attack other nestlings? the parents? Did I say I am not a fan of GHOs after Harriet and M15’s ongoing issues). Poor baby will be raised by loving hands. And will probably never be able to be released. So little. Just look at the egg tooth. This eaglet is going to take considerable resources. If you can, think of sending a small donation for its care – you can specify that it goes to this baby’s care. Someone will be feeding it non-stop during the day just like its parents would. Sweetness.

At the nests:

If you missed it, CE9 has been named Connick after Connor and Nick at Window to Wildlife. They did all the work getting the cams and platforms back up for the eagles enabling all of us to be able to watch the Captiva Eagles, Connie and Clive, and the Ospreys, Mabel and Angus. Great choice!

The feeding that started in the image above resulted in a huge crop for Connick.

The snow that was falling last evening at the MN-DNR (Minnesota Department of Natural Resources) Bald Eagle nest has melted. When the camera was running this morning I could hear ducks and geese. Then the camera rotated and showed us a great place for the eagles to get their prey – absolutely close to the nest!

Both Nancy and her mate were at the nest doing some work.

The snow was also gone at the Berry College nest of Pa and Missy. That little B16 is such a cutie and it is working those wings to balance itself trying to get out of the nest cup already! This little one is strong and is going to be a handful. The other egg is not viable. There is rabbit, squirrel, and fish on the menu thanks to Pa’s great hunting.

The snow is also gone from Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ. Mum is rolling the two eggs.

Jack and Diane continue to visit the Achieva Osprey nest in St Petersburg. No eggs yet. Soon.

All of those nests are great. I just about had a heart attack today when I saw Pearl at the Superbeaks nest back up to ‘ps’ and she just about slipped off the edge. It was a hold your breath moment. The railings are gone around that left branch – or so it seems. I cannot see. Pearl immediately got her grip and moved forward.

It is hard to imagine but little B16 will be this size in 35 days!

The wings are being exercised.

Pearl is gorgeous.

Alex delivered a fish and Andria went to help defend him and the nest against an intruder! There are so many intruders I am surprised that the males ever make it to the nests with prey for their families.

Things settled down. E01 and E02 are growing and growing like bad weeds. Remember to go on chat tomorrow at noon CT and put in a name suggestion for 01. It might make it to the finals.

Right now it is easy to tell the two eaglets apart. 01 has many more dark juvenile feathers.

02 has a nice crop that was revealed after that stretch. Looks like a real butterball sitting there.

The little one at the KNF E1 nest benefits from being an only eaglet. No one to share that fish with but Mum!!!!!! And Anna does love her fish dinners.

Anna loves to make sure that 03 has its crop full to the brim. Just one last bite, sweetie.

Gabby and V3 were in and out of the nest on Thursday. These screen captures were taken around noon.

SK Hideaways caught the new guy bringing Annie a gift! Oh, thank you, new guy!!!!!! It’s a Starling and Annie doesn’t flinch…she doesn’t mind Starlngs. Only a brief tug-o-war. Remember…Diamond hates them. So hopeful for about three eggs in Annie’s scrape and three very active eyases. That will keep the ‘new guy’ busy.

Remember to go on chat at the KNF E3 nest tomorrow, Friday until noon on Saturday to propose a name for 01. The rangers will take the entries down to 3 and have a public vote. I missed the Ventana Wildlife chat today about the condors because I could not sign on to their Zoom. The link will be posted sometime on Friday to the archived event and I will include it in Saturday’s blog. Those are always informative sessions. We wait for Osprey eggs.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Please take care of yourself. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, announcements, posts, tweets, videos, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Fran Solly and Friends of Osprey, The Guardian, Cal Falcons, Raptor Persecution UK, Kakapo Recover and the Wildlife Hospital – Dunedin, CROW, Window to Wildlife, MN-DNR, Berry College, Duke Farms, Achieva Credit Union, Superbeaks, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, NEFL-AEF, and SK Hideaways and Cal Falcons.

If you would like to receive a copy of my daily blog, please feel free to sign up. We would love to have you as one of our feathered family. I try to send one blog per day so as not to overload your inbox. Sometimes there are two if something is happening. There are no ads, no fees. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Both Red-tail Hawks found dead at Syracuse, another fish on E22’s head?…Tuesday in Bird World

24 January 2022

Good Morning to all of you,

Thank you so much for your letters and your comments. I really do enjoy hearing from you. I cannot always answer immediately but, I try not to be too long!

I am having to have a big laugh because I don’t want a big cry! No, no, nothing to do with birds. It is auto-correct! I have gone over this blog twice and keep finding the auto correct correcting things after I have moved on…it seems I have to check the words 3x before it stops. (I do like it to catch my spelling as I go so it is a bit of a double-edged sword for me). So I hope when you read this that the word ‘allopreening’ will be there and not ‘alley preening’!

It snowed a bit and the winds were blowing at times in the gardens. The European Starlings came early to feed off the suet cylinders. There were 43 of them! That is the highest count I have had all year.

The House Sparrows were absolutely everywhere. At the feeders. On the ground foraging and in the lilacs. Everywhere I looked there was a sparrow. Squint. They are in layers blending in to the lilacs and feeding with the Starlings at the suet.

The kittens loved watching them flit about. No Dove today. I hope it has found a wonderful and safe place for food!


Making News:

I am shaking my head in complete disbelief. Just the other day I posted the passing of Sue, the beautiful RTH and mate of Otto, at Syracuse University. She died of what appears to be head trauma on the 18th. The photo of Sue in the announcement was taken in the Oakwood Cemetery on that same day. Otto was found dead on the 19th in the cemetery. Did he also die on the 18th? or the 19th? I find this simply too much of a coincidence and it makes me highly suspicious that something caused these two beautiful birds to meet their demise that is not immediately evident. We will find out from the necroscopy, thank goodness. But that does not make this less a tragedy. If these deaths are not an accident or a natural cause, then the sadness is deepened. Condolences to everyone at Syracuse University and all those that loved Sue and Otto.

Did you know that the Ventana Wildlife Society provides lead free ammunition to hunters in specific counties in California to help halt the Condors (and other wildlife) from getting ill or dying from lead poisoning?

The VWS website gives all the information on what they offer and who is eligible. If you know of someone who hunts or is a rancher in these areas and they continue to use lead ammunition, please have them get in touch with the VWS immediately. The Condors will thank you!

The VWS produced a really short video about Cedric and his recovery from lead poisoning.

Do you want to know more about Condors? Do you love them as much as I do? Why not check out the monthly Zoom chats with the folks at the Ventana Wildlife Society? Go to ventananews.org and click on the link that you see below, to the left.

Skycalls, fluffy white chicks with cute pink bills and feet, allopreening adults, what isn’t there to love about an albatross?

Lady Hawk gives us some real cutie pie images of the Royal Cam chick in this video.

No Osprey egg yet at the Achieva Credit Union nest in St Petersburg, Florida but, we should be looking towards the end of January if our gal, Diane, sticks to her previous pattern of egg-laying.

They have mated on the pole, on the nest and probably around the neighbourhood…when do you think there will be an egg?

CE9 can really handle those big bites that Connie gives it. If Mum would only stop putting her beak under CE9’s, I think they would get a success rating of 100%. The wee one continues to benefit from numerous feedings per day and is growing stronger and stronger.

CE9 and Dudley.

Connie decides it is time for a feeding.

Clive arrives to check on his baby and the pantry and then is off doing territorial protection.

A bit of a stringy mess.

From an empty crop to a full one.

CE9 is getting very, very full.

Nap time. How many whole and partial fish can you find on this nest?

As the sun sets over the Captiva Bald Eagle nest of Connie, Clive, and CE9, the little one gets its last fish meal of the day.

In 2014, the Bald Eagles at Duke Farms in Hillsborough, NJ laid their first egg on the 17th of February. In 2022, the first egg was laid on the 17th of January – precisely a month earlier. This year that first egg was laid on 20 January so the eagles are sticking with this earlier nesting time. It only makes me wonder – as we wish for eggs from Gabby and Rose – if it might just be too hot in Florida for such a late hatch?

And just like clockwork, there is a second egg at Duke Farms!

It looks like Alex on the KNF-E3 nest trying to coax the two eaglets, 01 and 02 over to have some nice fresh fish.

Can you see the Mohawks?

Mum flies to the nest and both adults look over to the lake. Is there an intruder?

Are the parents testing the youngsters? Alex took off and Mum flew back to the branch. That whole fish is still there. Wonder if anyone will move to the table and try to eat it?

E01 is trying to balance itself to stand and walk. 02 looks on with interest.

Walking on a stick nest is not as easy as it looks.

The parent watches when its chick pecks at the fish. The babies are growing up with those big heavy wings and feathers coming in.

Would you like some fish?

Confidence is back in 02. The meal went well.

Do you like the Pittsburgh-Hayes Eagle nest? Mum and Dad were there today – and mating ——in the snow!

There are winter storm warnings for various parts of the US including Oklahoma, my old home State, and a system tracking up through Iowa, Ohio, and into New York. I went to check on Big Red’s nest to see if she was getting the snow that was hitting Pittsburg and the camera was down. Then the computer did a funny thing and there was Superbeaks. I was not expecting this image. It is smaller here but filled up my entire screen almost – and I held my breath. Do not, listen you two, look so far down that you go flipsy.

What is of such interest below? is it a parent on a lower branch?

There are not a lot of ‘dandelions’ left on these two as those almost black juvenile feathers continue to grow longer and longer.

Oh, it is windy on the nest of Jackie and Shadow at Big Bear. The storm system is east of the Colorado River and is not expected to hit them. Yippeeee. They get a break. Shadow brought in prey and is incubating while Jackie has a break.

The wind is gusty. You can see it blowing the feathers on the back of Shadow’s head above and then it is calm below.

Do you know why raptors roll their eggs? FOBBV reminds us: “Eggs are rolled regularly to prevent the embryo & egg membranes from sticking to the shell & to distribute albumen & heat evenly.”

Thank you, Sharon Pollock. I wish my eyes were a little better but, what a beautiful sight that was of Jackie and Shadow soaring together around and over the nest tree. Just amazing.

Mabel and Angus are sure a handsome couple at the Captiva Osprey nest.

What a difference! The warm sunshine of Florida to the hoar frost in Iowa at the Decorah Eagle nest. It sure is beautiful.

Fans of the Redding Eagles…there was an adult on the nest today!

The cuteness of Ron and Rose caught by HeidiMc.

It is not clear what is happening with the second egg at Berry College. Are those marks or is that chick trying to get out of that shell?

This is little Boots at Webster, Texas raising its head for a bite of fish. It ‘appears’ from the posts today that things are going well and Ringo is behaving her/his self.

Worry spread through the SWFlorida Eagle fans as blood appeared on the top of E22’s head – it was another fish landing there!

Someone will be watching to see if this is just blood from the fish or a possible scratch caused by the fish on the nape of 22.

22 ate well and there was little if any beaking that I could see today.

Zoe is 129 days old. Mum delivered a single fish to her girl yesterday and, she might well have had a fish off camera. Today Zoe left the nest and it appears she might have returned wet from an excursion or she might have tried fishing off the barge (the camera was stuck on zoom). It is really hard to tell. What we do know is that Zoe is still home. From my perspective she looks ‘well fed’ and healthy.

One last tidbit about the falcons…but not Annie and the New Guy or Indigo but Sequoia and her mate at the San Jose City Hall scrape. Seems you have to be careful where you stash away your prey in San Jose, too.

Who is Sequoia’s mate? HeidiMc found out! Shasta is a very interesting falcon.

What the poster below doesn’t say is when you set out and kill any insect or animal, it has a severe impact on the food chain. Think mice and rats. Secondary poisoning in domestic pets and raptors is real. We need those insects, we need the pigeons (yes people put poison on their roofs to kill the pigeons – those pigeons could kill our beautiful peregrine falcons), etc. So take care and talk about this with your friends and loved ones.

Thank you so very much for being with us today. Tomorrow I will have a review of Florence A Merriam’s Birds Through An Opera Glass. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their announcements, posts, videos, tweets, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: HeidiMc, Red-tailed Hawk Tails, Ventana Wildlife Society, Lady Hawk and NZ DOC, Achieva Credit Union, Window to Wildlife, Duke Farms, KNF-E3, Pix Cams, Superbeaks, FOBBV, Sharon Pollock and FOBBV, Raptor Research Project and Explore.org, Redding Eagles, HeidiMc and the WRDC, Duke Farms, Bel-A-Donna and Berry College, SWFlorida Eagles and D Pritchett, Port Lincoln Ospreys, and Pollinator Friendly Yards.

If you would like to join our wonderful birding community and receive a copy of my blog in your inbox daily, please feel free to subscribe. I desperately try not to load up your inbox and there is generally only one blog per day unless something really crazy happens and I think you will want to know asap. You can unsubscribe at any time!

First egg for Duke Farms, Ringo stops beaking, Royal cam chick hatches…life in Bird World for Saturday

21 January 2022

Good Morning to Everyone,

To all of our readers celebrating The New Year, The Year of the Water Rabbit or for those celebrating Tet, the Year of the Cat, in Vietnam, we wish you joy, good health, prosperity, and a long life. Have a wonderful holiday. I hope that you were able to spend it with your family, friends, or loved ones.

So what is entertaining the kittens! The Dove was as fascinated with them as they were with it. Tomorrow we are putting up a high table feeder for this Dove so that it might be able to eat without fear of the neighbourhood cats killing it! It spent part of the afternoon in the tree that you can see. That is a ‘female’ Maple. It has those helicopter seeds. I do wonder if the dove was able to eat some of those.

Making News:

Oh, my goodness, tears of joy. Redwood and Phoenix’s chick is now a fully grown juvenile and seen for the first time at Big Sur.

A little history for those that do not know the California Condor community. Prior to the Dolan Fire that began 18 August 2020 and destroyed much of Big Sur, the top male condor in the Big Sur Colony was Kingpin 167. Redwood Queen was known as ‘Slope Slug’. She spent all her time down the slope of the hill because the other condors harassed her so much. She was the one at the bottom of the hierarchy (just like all new ones are). THEN something magical happened. Kingpin 167 paired with Redwood Queen 190 and she instantly rose to the top of the ranks. Their most famous chick was Iniko 1031 who survived the Dolan fire as a nestling in a large Redwood Tree. Iniko was famous. Images of the young condor with the fire crackling around the tree went viral. Iniko survived the fire only to be injured when a male condor came into the nest. Redwood Queen arrived to save her chick. Iniko was injured when it was shoved out and down the nest. Iniko was taken to the Los Angeles Zoo for medical care and rehabilitation. Kingpin 167 is presumed not to have survived the fire and died. He has not been seen since. Redwood Queen pairs with 477 Phoenix, aptly named because he also survived a horrific wildlife, earlier. Their first egg laid in the old tree where Iniko hatched was not viable. The pair moved to a tree in Pinnacles National Park that Phoenix had shared with his former mate. There they raised 1174 in 2022. How lovely for both of them – both survivors of wildfires.

The VENTANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY has all the information about all of their condors and their programme to protect and improve their lives on their website. Today, however, there are many celebrations because the chick of Redwood Queen and Phoenix has been seen at the feeding station at Big Sur. This is a place, high in the hills, where the VENTANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY brings carcasses (without lead or any other toxins) for the Condors to feed on. We all know about the dominance issues with the little eaglets and ospreys, so you can well imagine what it is like in this pecking order!

In the UK, fury is growing over the most recent killing of raptors. Hopefully the voices of the people will become so loud that those politicians and police that are to protect the birds and obey the laws will change and do what is right.

I love Goshawks despite their raids on Osprey nests. Just like I love Red Kites – all raptors. Geemeff reposted this Tweet. It is so difficult to explain how people feel when day after day and week after week, the illegal killing of raptors in the UK continues in or on those estates where grouse are hunted and killed. The entire country should rise up against the privileged — and it is the privileged that own these estates and have hunting weekends on them. A small group that have loyal ties (both figuratively and literally) that allow this to keep happening.

I would also like to say the it takes skill to kill one goshawk but five??? So many of the bird community offering rewards to find the culprits which will be individuals associated with the hunting estates. Mark Avery says “Both RSPB and Wild Justice have each offered rewards of £5,000 for evidence leading to a conviction and Rare Bird Alert has started a crowdfunder to add to that sum. Let’s see the British Association for Shooting and Conservation and the Game and Wildlife ConservationTrust do something similar if they are serious about rooting out wildlife crime, but it would take a lot more than that to persuade me that they are. By the way, I haven’t heard or seen any comment from the local MP –  a guy called Matt Hancock.” The collusion needs to be stopped…and people need to do the right thing.

For those of us worried that something might have happened to Richmond, the resident male Osprey mated with Rosie, at the Richmond Whirley Crane in SF Bay, Richmond is fine. There he is in the streaming cam below! Oh, wonderful. Rosie migrates and she normally returns to her Richmond right around Valentine’s Day. The couple raised Brooks and Molate in 2022. Sadly, we lost Molate when he died on the nest. As far as I know the precise cause of death is not known.

Kakapo Recovery have positions open. If you or anyone you know might qualify to work for them for the next year, please check this out. I wish I were younger! What a privilege to help this species thrive and grow in numbers.

A Check on the Nests:

So happy to announce that there was a peaceful feeding at the Webster TX Bald Eagle nest. Yes!!!!!!! No beaking at all. Thanks Paul White for letting us know. The pleasantness has continued all day. The real question is why did it start and excel to such viciousness…but, the great news is that it is over for a day, so let’s add another day, and another one and see two fledge. Yes.

There is only one day separating them in age. Ringo is the oldest – hatched on the 12th of January – so 9 days old today.  Ringo stopped beaking on his 8th day. Boots is the youngest and hatched on the 13th.  There is only a day’s difference.  8 days old.

I have been checking Duke Farms now and again but, not often. Thanks Paul for posting these images on Bald Eagles 101 for us. Congratulations to Duke Farms.

Beautiful Jackie first light. 20 January 2023.

This is a video to go with Shadow flying in and wanting a turn at incubation on the 15th. What a great guy. I love these two…they are so funny. Shadow with his big sticks and wanting time with the eggs. Precious.

Elain’s highlights from the 20th at the scrape of Diamond and Xavier. No worries. Indigo is there in full volume. Gosh, we will miss him when he leaves the territory!

All is well at the Captiva Bald Eagle nest.

CE9 and the parents really have this feeding thing down…the little one is going to get stronger and stronger. Isn’t this just such a relief? Just look at the fish on that side of the nest!!!!!! This baby should never be hungry.

Nice crop after the first feeding of the morning. Little one is stronger, is using its wing tips to balance – and is eating well. Bravo.

CE9 snatched that big piece of fish out of Connie’s beak before she could change her mind. Way to go CE9!!!!!!!!!!

Here comes another biggie!!!!!!!!! Never fear. CE9 is on top of this. He has figured it out. Mum gets a big bite, then wants to think about whether she should feed it or eat it. CE9 says ‘feed it!’ and he grabs. Gets it.

CE9 is getting fluffier and fluffier, too and you can see this cute little eaglet with its little tail. So thankful that all that fish juice did not cause any problem to its eyes.

Fish everywhere! This nest has really turned around. Thanks, Clive for all the fish and giving the little guy a boost the other evening. It sure helped.

Life is good at Superbeaks. Seriously. These eaglets are huge!!!!!!!! They will absolutely be the size of their parents in about 10 days. Like all other raptors, their wings will be longer than their parents to help them fly at the beginning. Think of a very large turkey!

Pearl.

Tico is panting to regulate his temperature in the hot Florida sun.

Working those wings.

The Royal cam chick has hatched. Congratulations to L and GLY and to all the NZ DOC rangers and everyone at Taiaroa Head.

I did not watch the KNF E3 nest today but, ‘A’ filled me in. Her description of what happened is detailed and wonderful and I want to share it with you (with her permission). This flowing record is a precise recount of how the dominant eaglet often gets fed and the others down the line might not. Were the parents preoccupied with something? We do not know. It is, however, a relief that E02 was full to the brim. A week ago I was giving Adrian the Mum of the Week award. Things change quickly and E01 did quite a bit of beaking and shaking – enough to give E02 pause to be cautious. Survival. Survival out of the eyes of both eaglets.

Alex brought a new breakfast fish in to the KNF3 nest at about 06:48. Mum flew up to a perch branch and left things to dad, who looked a little confused. The eaglets were ready for breakfast! At 06:51:20 mum flies off. Dad is still unsure, and eventually he flies up to a perch branch, then away. The chicks are surprised and disappointed and go back to sleep. Mum reappears at 07:03:51 and starts feeding 01, who is first to the table. Little 02 waits a few  moments for 01 to have some food, then edges up to mum’s beak but at 07:12 it still has not had a mouthful. 01 considers turning away from the table, full already, but sees 02 getting close so considers changing its mind and going back for more fish. In the end, it decides not to bother, Finally, at 07:12:38, 02 reaches the beak but by now, Andria is eating her own breakfast. The little one waits patiently, while 01 waddles away and collapses in the middle of the nest, in a food coma.  The little one moves even closer to mum, reminding her that it still has had no breakfast. At 07:13:18 it gets its first (and only) mouthful. It tries to nibble at the fish. Mum flies off at 07:14:14, having fed 02 a single mouthful of breakfast and nothing more!! The little one continues to attempt to self-feed. The headless, largely uneaten fish is a much easier proposition for 02 than yesterday’s ancient coot, and it is getting some bites from the fish but soon gives up. The pair settle in for a snuggle. 

When mum returns at 07:28:04 she is empty-taloned. She does not attempt to feed the chicks, instead aerating the nest, moving some sticks around, and then brooding the eaglets! She flies off the nest at 07:37:36, having still not fed 02 more than one mouthful of breakfast. There is a hardly touched, decent-sized fish sitting on the nest. Just before 08:08 a parent (Alex?) arrives, surveys the scene, and aerates the nest. He goes to the fish and little 02, having just had a reasonable PS, rushes up to his beak to be fed, as 01 watches but doesn’t get up. Finally, 02 is getting some breakfast. But not much, as Alex feeds it only a mouthful, at m two,08:09:56. before flying off at 08:09:56. Little 02 resumes nibbling at the fish (try the headless end, sweetie, not the tail) but eventually gives up. Dad returns a few minutes later with a stick, which he positions carefully. He then flies off again, without feeding either eaglet. By now, 02 is getting really hungry. It falls asleep in a cuddle puddle with 01. 

Dad is back with another stick at 08:32. As he moves around the nest to place his stick, dad is followed by 02, who is desperately hoping for food. But dad flies off the nest at 08:40:15. Mum is back at 08:53:42 but sits on the nest for a full 20 minutes. It is after 09:13 before she finally moves to the fish. Little 02 is up to the beak in a flash and finally gets some bites of fish. It is soon joined by 01, who takes over front position. Little 02 remains patient and finally gets fed breakfast. Afterwards, both eaglets have massive crops. 

‘A’, 20 January 2023

There were many other feedings during the day. Both eaglets ate well and there is no cause for alarm.

11:00:53

12:22:20. E02 getting fed. E01 in food comma from the earlier feeding at 11:00.

4:56:44. E02 eating again.

By 15:10, E01 is up at the table getting the bites. Good thing little one was up there first!

Zoe is quite the character. She is 126 days old today. And yesterday, Dad brought her 2 fish. She had to wait on Saturday until 15:23:40 for a fish delivery and oh, wow. She was so excited to see that fish coming in. What is interesting is that Zoe had been away from the nest for approximately an hour. She flew in to the nest, did the toe dance, and the fish arrived. What I am suggesting is she was where the parents were fishing and saw them heading to the barge with the fish OR was somewhere near enough to see them flying in with her dinner.

If you are wondering when Zoe might leave the nest, Calypso the 2019 female fledgling left on 9 February; Solly left the nest area for good on 2 February. Zoe has some time yet before parents begin to think about eviction. Of course, Ervie was there a way longer!!!!!!!!!!!!

Gabby and her ‘man’.

E22’s eye is fine. Is there a pip at Berry College – will find out in the morning! So much going on but, for right now, it is all good.

Thank you so very much for joining me today. Take care. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their notes, their posts, their announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures for my blog: Ventana Wildlife Society, Raptor Persecution UK, Geemeff, SF Ospreys and Golden Gate Audubon, Kakapo Recovery, Webster Texas Eagle Cam Watchers, Paul Kolnik Bald Eagles 101 and Duke Farms, FOBBV, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, Window to Wildlife, Superbeaks, Sharon Dunne and the Royal Cam Albatross Group NZ and the NZ DOC, KNF-E3, Port Lincoln Ospreys and NEFL-AEF.

Would you like to subscribe to this blog? We would love to have you as part of our daily mailings. You can unsubscribe at any time! There is normally only one posting a day unless something ‘big’ happens in Bird World.

Thanks to Clive, CE9 goes to sleep with a crop…Wednesday in Bird World

18 January 2022

Hello Everyone!

The temperature was -9 with 15 km/h winds and 85% humidity. It was the wind and the humidity that were the issues at the nature centre. That cold wind just went through all the layers. It was the first time my hands have been cold and I always wear the same gloves. It was eerily quiet.

Few were out in the forest and a lone deer was walking around not paying any mind. He looked over at me. What a beauty. How privileged to be able to see these gorgeous creatures in an urban environment where they are safe. I caught up with him again as I wandered on the paths.

It was a good day to get out for a walk and for a few minutes move past the worry of the little one at Captiva. We expect every raptor parent to be a Harriet or an M15 and the truth is, they aren’t. They are all individuals. To get a combination of great parenting, a super source for prey, and not bad weather is a big feat for all of our raptor families. Sometimes it doesn’t work out and watching a little eaglet hungry on a nest bursting with fish is almost too much. There is hope though and all of you continue to send your most positive wishes to the Captiva nest. At 18:11ish, Clive – please note this – Clive – begins feeding the wee one. At 18:22 and then again in a minute, the little eaglet had the best crop that I have seen. I am absolutely in tears. Tears of joy. As ‘A’ notes, Clive watched the nest and I am certain he is concerned for his baby crying for food when the nest is full. Thanks, Clive, for stepping in and feeding CE9.

The kittens offer a welcome respite. Missy is just a bundle of fluff and sweetness. Lewis is ‘something else’. It is rare that he sits still.

In the mailbox:

You will remember the removal of the Bald Eagle nest – with the eagles in the area – from a microwave tower – in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina caused such furore and for good reason. Highly illegal. Many of us wrote to the USFWS. I am pleased to report that along with those who wrote to tell me they had received responses, I received one as well this morning. One reader, ‘B’ wants us to note the crime tips address to report such illegal activities to protected wildlife. Put it in your phone if you live in the US. Thank you to everyone who took the time to write. So many responses appear to have led to a form letter and that is a good thing. The governmental agencies, wherever we live, that are responsible for the protection of our raptors, need to know that the public is outraged when there is non-compliance.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works to conserve and manage both bald eagle and golden eagle populations to assure both species continue to thrive.  

The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection act prohibits anyone from disturbing the birds without a permit.  Disturb means to cause injury, interfere with normal breeding, feeding and sheltering behavior or nest abandonment.  Penalties for doing so could result in fines up to $5,000 or imprisoned up to a year or both.  The Service has developed a National Bald Eagle Management Plan that helps to determine appropriate buffers and distances from certain activities to protect our bald eagle populations.  

Bald eagles are increasing in numbers throughout the State, showing greater tolerance to human presence and establishing new nesting territories closer to development.  

This expansion of territories exposes them more frequently to human activities, and they continue to adapt.  We are committed to working with others to continue advancing eagle conservation and protection while enabling partners to meet their operational goals. We are able to confirm there is an active investigation.

Per Service policy, we do not comment on active investigations, nor do we share information regarding holders of permits and activities as some of this information is considered Personally Identifiable Information and cannot be released.  The Service welcomes tips regarding this case.  Information can be submitted at: https://www.fws.gov/wildlife-crime-tips

‘A’ sent us more news about the floating platforms to help wildlife on the Yarra River in Australia. Brilliant idea especially after the flooding we had in Manitoba.

https://www.docklandsnews.com.au/floating-wetlands-set-to-transform-the-yarra-river-in-docklands/

Leicester and Rutland Wildlife Trust reminds us:

Not raptors but a thank you to a special young woman who dedicated her life to saving wildlife. Today is Dian Fossey’s birthday. One of the released condors by the VENTANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY in 2022 was named after Dian.

Speaking of VENTANA WILDLIFE SOCIETY, they were able to clear the roads up to Big Sur after the horrific weather to deliver lead-free carrion to the Condors! Yes.

At the nests:

The short throttling and some head beaking by the oldest eaglet on the KNF-E3 nest have caused 02 to be a little wary of its sibling. I notice that Alex has been on and off the nest and that the wee one has waited this morning for the oldest to eat before it ventured to the table. At 0939 the second hatch also had a private feeding. The eaglets are 23 and 20 days old. Normally with Bald Eagles any aggression ends at around 30 days but, this was unexpected and one has to wonder about hormonal changes with the growth of the blood feathers. Or a slow down in food deliveries.

At 0736, E01 is eating and E02 is holding back before going up to the table to avoid confrontation and beaking. Smart move little one. Notice that it is watching.

02 is up at the table and Dad is on the nest. Both will have crops.

At 0748, E02 had a nice crop.

At 0924:

At 0938, E02 gets a bit of a private feeding.

At 1028, both have medium sized crops.

Oh, gosh, golly. Anna has her mojo back. She is doing great feeding KNF E1-03. Little fella had a huge crop and could hardly move at one of the later feedings. Images from 3 different afternoon feedings.

Crop was so big, 03’s head just fell to the side in a food coma.

There continues to be concern for the eaglet at Captiva. CROW is aware of the situation and monitoring it but there are laws and hurdles and one must be mindful. It is much better for the eaglet to be on the nest. There has been speculation as to if there is something wrong with the eaglets beak but, from my seat, the bites have been too big and Connie has been too quick to pull back and eat those that are a proper size. It is unclear what she expects a new little eaglet to do. She should be waiting and holding and encouraging. Let us all hope that this happen and CE9 begins to thrive. As someone said, we would all hate to see an eaglet starve on a nest full of fish. So let us all send positive wishes that the adults gather themselves and get the feedings going properly.

The eaglet’s talons look dehydrated to me. Maybe it is the angle but I like to think about those fat little pinkies at SWFlorida and above at the KNF nest. Let’s see how CE9’s are in a few days if it gets some good meals from Dad.

There is just so much fish juice going on this baby. But, you can see a bit of a crop in the second image and right now, that is all I care about. This baby needs fish and it needs a wash.

I am going to sleep a little better tonight. I want you to look at its crop. It is hungry and it is figuring this out, too, and is getting some of that fish. Time 18:12:25-18:13:29. Clive, you need to step in more often. You are a great provider. I guess you need to feed this baby til Connie figures out what to do! Not every female is a natural mother.

The weather has shifted at Big Bear. Shadow has delivered two fish to Jacket so far on Tuesday and it is only 1300. The first arrived at 11:10 and the second at 12:03. Things are good at Big Bear. Bless their hearts they aren’t going to let any Crows get these eggs!

Shadow, you are wonderful!

Eating first fish.

Sweet Eagle Dreams, Jackie.

If you missed Jackie and the snow storm, SK Hideaways caught it in video for all of us.

These days whenever I am a little frustrated with a nest, I just go and check on Superbeaks! Pearl has lost her Mohawks. You will see in later images that Tico still has his. They are so curious about what is happening outside and below the nest. These two ‘always’ have big crops. Mum of the Week Award goes to Muhlady!

We are into week 5 and going into week 6. During weeks 5-6. they should be poking their heads out of the nest rim and observing the world around them – which they are doing. The parents will begin to spend more time near the nest but not directly in it with the eaglets. The eaglets will be fed by the parents up until about week 6 when they should be self-feeding. Of course, we know from watching the nests that the parents will feed them on and off much longer, encoring self-feeding so they can become fully independent. By week 6, they should be standing and walking with some ease. Their juvenile feather growth continues. By the end of week 7, they should be nearing their full growth. These eaglets are just spot on in terms of their development. Thanks for the close ups, cam op!

Just look at this healthy eaglet!!!!!!!!!

And now for the other end!

Check out the tail growth from a different view.

Last meal of the day on Monday. Tico is nearest to us. You can still see the dandelions on top of his head which should be gone by Wednesday. Muhlady is feeding Tico and he is stealing pieces of fish when she is slow to offer. Well done, Tico.

Thunder and Akecheta were checking on the state of their nest at the West End in the Channel Islands today.

Is it possible that our Gabby has another potential mate? Seriously. He is quite handsome. Actually, he is stunning. Or did he just happen by Monday evening? V3 will make quick work of this one!

And he did. V3 is on the perch at 1700 Tuesday evening!

This image of Gabby and V3 on the Lumberyard Branch is making the rounds. I don’t know where it started…but smile.

For all the Redding Eagle fans, Gary has a video up. The solar panels on the camera could not get charged during the fortnight of storms and rain in the area. The camera is now up and here is a great video showing Liberty (she is 24) and Guardian (he is 9) at the nest!

At the WRDC nest or Ron and Rose, it is clear that Ron has been working hard to get a nest ready and look at that soft egg cup. He sure does love to cuddle up in it and try it out. I wish I could speak Eagle but I wonder if he is trying to tell Rose that the eggs go in that nice soft spot. What do you think?

“Now, Rose, all you have to do is lay the eggs in this nice little space in the centre of the nest.” “Then I will bring you lots of fish, and in about 38 days there will be little eaglets just like us to feed.”

Indigo paid a visit to the scrape box! It has been several days despite his loud calling being heard. Nice to see you, Indigo. Elain made one of her videos showing Indigo entranced with spider webs. Enjoy!

Zoe is 123 days old. She is hoping for fish today. Zoe loves to be served…but, when she figures out if she goes fishing and she finally catches one..well, our girl will be off and running. She will be so excited. Fish! Anytime she wants one (if she catches it).

That is a quick look at some of the nests we are watching. There are many more – all working on repairing nests and getting ready for their breeding season. Send warm wishes to the little one on the Captiva nest. Positive energy can do wonders.

Thank you so much for being with me today. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their notes, their posts, tweets, announcements, videos, and streaming cams that make up my screen captures: ‘A’, ‘B’, Window to Wildlife, USFWS, Dockland news, LRWT, Mighty Gals, Ventura Wildlife Service, KNF-E3, KNF-E1, FOBBV, SK Hideaways and FOBBV, Superbeaks, IWS and Explore.org, NEFL-AEF, Gary’s Eagle Videos and the Redding Eagles, WRDC, Elain and Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, and Port Lincoln Ospreys.