A quick look at Osprey chicks in care — and is it really goodbye, Tiny?

You may have heard that osprey chicks do not do well if they are taken from the nest and placed into care. But is this true? Last year, anyone watching the Port Lincoln Osprey Nest knew that Little Tapps was not going to survive. Solly was too big and too aggressive and when the middle chick, DEW, began to turn on the little one and keep it from eating it was not ‘if’ but ‘when’ would Tapps die. It was emotionally devastating. How many wanted to toss a cloth cover over the camera and at least try and rescue that baby?

In less than a week, news of two interventions came to my desk and thanks to my friend, “T”, two others last evening. Wonder how many more there were? There was at least one Osprey chick taken into care due to the extreme heat in the British Columbia interior. It had fallen out of its nest and bystanders notified SORCO, the only raptor rehabilitation centre in the area at Oliver. They retrieved the three week old chick immediately hydrating it. The staff said that Ospreys can become stressed when in care but, this one is so young they anticipate that it will adapt.

On 3 July an Osprey nest caught on fire when the transformer next to the nest blew. The parents were able to escape, one chick perished, and the other chick was taken into care. The chick was suffering from severe smoke inhalation and some burns from the fire. That precious little one is on oxygen and pain relief therapy. It was initially given high levels of oxygen using a mask but now it is an oxygen incubator. The chick is resting comfortably at the Raptor Tales Rescue in Wareham, MA. Its condition is ‘guarded’.

Sweet little baby. That had to be extremely scary with all the smoke, fire, and noise.

Many other Osprey chicks have been orphaned and placed in nests with foster parents. It is surprising how often this occurs with no ill effects. We saw this recently in Finland and near St Petersburg when another Osprey nest fell down on 29 April. The parents left and all of the chicks died but one. Baby Foster was placed in a nest where there was only one other baby. The parents accepted the new chick immediately. Baby Foster fledged on 13 June. The events with Baby Foster and his new family were caught on video by one of St Petersburg’s local photographers, Kathleen Finnerty.

It is midnight in St Petersburg, Florida. All eyes are on the nest of Tiny Tot and right now, it is calm but Tiny Tot is not there. She came in during the early morning of 5 July. Was she scared by fireworks?

It has been 100 years since a major storm hit the Tampa area. If you look carefully, you will see that St Petersburg is right at the entrance to Tampa Bay.

Tiny Tot has not been on the nest since 9am on the 5th of July. She has not come for a fish and to my knowledge, Jack has not brought any fish to the nest for her since 4 July when there were at least two fish brought in during the early evening. Jack knows where Tiny is or he would be on the nest checking for her. Did the fireworks scare her on her way? did she get tired of chasing off intruders? or did her instincts kick in and tell her it was time to leave the nest?

Here are some images of Tiny over the last few months. They are in no particular order and I have left all the lines and date stamps for you. I will, one day this week, put together a comprehensive album of this miraculous little one – a third hatch that was tough, that survived, and who will do well. What a privilege it was to watch this clever little one become a big strong juvenile.

Tiny, thank you for staying around as long as you did! Stay safe out there. Enjoy the fishing. Have an extraordinary life. You deserve it.

Thank you for joining me today. Here is the model of the storm that is set to hit the Tampa area today. We will be watching and sending warm thoughts to all the nests in that area. Be safe little ones! The recent revised forecast is for Elsa to be a cat 1 hurricane hitting the Tampa area around 11pm tonight. Prayers for all the birds.

Thank you to the Achieva Credit Union for the streaming cam where I took my screen shots of Tiny Tot and her family. Many thanks also to Raptor Tales Rescue for the images on their FB page that I used to show osprey chicks in care.

Bird World News: Rescues, a fledge, and a Hurricane?

I want to give a shout out to Fortis BC for helping the South Okanagan’s only birds of prey rescue centre, SORCO, retrieve two baby Ospreys from a nest in Penticton. People saw the babies hanging over the sides of the nest panting and looking very dehydrated. The parents were unable to feed them because of the extreme heat driving the fish to the bottom of the rivers and lakes.

The Osprey platforms are out in the open – in the direct sun – and the chicks took a real hit by the heat when temperatures in the area rose into the high 40s on Wednesday.

@ CastaNet News Kelowna
@CastaNet News Kelowna

The babies are being fed and rehydrated. SORCO says they are doing well. They will be kept in care for approximately six weeks. SORCO says they have rescued 23 raptors during the extreme heat wave.

Elsa is now a hurricane and is expected to impact Florida and the region of the Osprey nests in St Petersburg early next week. The National Hurricane Centre is advising everyone to keep an eye on the hurricane as it now develops and what happens after it passes over the Antilles. You can follow the news here:

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at5.shtml?start#contents

All of our eyes will be on that system now that it has strengthened from a Tropical Storm to a hurricane because of our beloved Tiny Tot at the Achieva Osprey Nest in St Petersburg. The hurricane is currently located over Barbados (the white circle in the purple area).

Electra did not spend the night perched on the Cowlitz PUD Osprey nest but she has returned sometime this morning before 7am nest time.

The female chick, Blue 095, at Rutland Manton Bay has fledged today, 2 July, one day after her brother, Blue 096. Here is that flight:

It is definitely getting harder, at first glance, to tell who is who on the Foulshaw Moss Nest in Cumbria where Tiny Little Tot lives on the nest of White YW and Blue 35. Indeed, Blue 35 is testing the kids self-feeding skills today!

The male claimed the fish that arrived and didn’t do a bad job with the self-feeding. Tiny Little was right there hoping he would share! or feed him!! I do hope Blue 35 feeds Tiny Little today and doesn’t just let the bigger ones grab all of the fish.

The last time I saw Tiny Tot on the Achieva Credit Union nest she was waiting for a fish delivery. K1 and K3 had been fed and were over together on the Rice Building. So all is well in Ithaca.

Take care everyone. That is our early morning nest round up for Friday, 2 July.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I get my screen shots: Cumbrian Wildlife Trust and the Foulshaw Moss Osprey Cam and the Cowlitz PUD.

Featured image is FortisBC and SORCO going up to rescue osprey chicks in Penticton.

K1 fledges, K2 taken into care and other news in Bird World. 22 June 2021

Before I even begin to write about everything that is happening on the nests, I want to show you an image of a gorgeous bird. Elegant even. Did you read that right. Did I just say that an Osprey was elegant? If she were a human, she could be a model on the Chanel runway. The perfectly symmetrical white V running from the top of her beak over each eye, the black mascara running through her eyes spaced evenly on both sides of her head, her stance, the beautifully elongated body, the turning of her head to look back, and the inner confidence.

Tiny Tot radiates all of those and more.

The image below shows Tiny Tot on 4 April. Sibling #2 would not let our wee one get near the food. There s/he is hungry. She had not eaten for over 2 days. Tiny Tot is almost falling off the side of the nest so that #2 will not peck his head or twist his neck. All it wants is some fish. Sibling #2 will actually keep eating when it is beyond full just so Tiny cannot eat.

Here is Tiny Tot a little later after Diane started bringing in catfish. Notice his/her little legs are filling in, the wee tail and the cute little bottom has some fat on it, too. Things turned around once Diane started bringing in her big catfish – and once she knew that Three was going to survive.

Tiny Tot survived by being clever, being patient, watching at every detail, and assessing the situation before acting. We can all learn a lot from this beautiful survivor.

There is another little bird struggling to survive on another nest. It is hard to imagine how the two Bobs on the Cowlitz nest in Longview, Washington will fare. I think that Electra is going to have to forget about who does what on the nest and go out and fish. She has proven that she is an excellent fisher – just like Diane. The chicks at Cowlitz are hungry. Electra is hungry. And today the more aggressive chick kept the other from having any fish at one of the meals.

It really reminded me of the position that Tiny Tot was in. There is the poor little thing cowering over at the rails. Even when the other had stopped eating, it would not allow the submissive chick to eat. The same behaviour as sibling #2 towards Tiny Tot.

There had to be another fish delivered later because when I checked again both had crops albeit the dominant chick’s was bigger. Indeed, more than twice the size of the other. But, I won’t complain. Both ate. I wish beyond wishing that Electra would go out and fish and turn this nest around.

Speaking of hungry, the Golden eaglet in the Bucovina, Czechoslovakia nest was so hungry. Yesterday, it ate a leg bone but bones do not provide hydration. Today, Lady Hawk posted a video of the eaglet eating the roe deer with its mother. I can only imagine how hungry both of them were. It is my understanding that there had only been 1 or 2 tiny birds brought to the nest in a five day period. It reminded me too much of Klints and Spilve. One of the things that the streaming cams teach us is that life is very challenging for our wildlife. In this instance also, humans need to learn to not interfere when there is an active nest.

Here is the video of Mom delivering the little deer to the nest:

And Lady Hawk just wrote to me and told me that Dad had brought a hooded crow for Mom to feed the little Golden eaglet. What fantastic news – both parents are well and hunting! Relief.

Speaking of relief. The little hawklet of Big Red and Arthur was taken into care this morning after K1 fledged at 8:27:31. There were no issues and K3 didn’t even notice. Well, I was certainly wrong on that. Was sure that K3 would fledge first! Here is the video of that smooth fledge of K1 – just like she had been flying all her life. She is 51 days old today. This is the latest fledge on this nest ever. Here is the video:

K2 has rhe best veterinary care a bird could ever hope to have! They will return her to the care of Big Red asap if that is possible.

Wow. The eaglet has food, the retrieval of K2 went well, K1 flew like a pro and so we wait for that cute little feisty one, K3 to leave the nest in Ithaca, New York. Thanks for joining me today. There is definitely some good news on the nests.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I get my screen shots: Achieva Credit Union, Cowlicks PUD, Cornell Bird Lab and RTH, and to Lady Hawk aka Sharon Dunne for her video and her kindness.

K3 looking out to the big world:

A Hop and a Skip through the Nests

Thanks to one of the chatters on the Achieva Osprey Nest, I found out that the two chicks and Electra did have one fish delivery today. Thank you Burky! I had missed it and was feeling pretty horrible for those little ones because the rain is just pouring down at Cowlitz.

It wasn’t a big fish. In fact, it could have been the leftovers from yesterday’s big fish. I don’t care. It was fish for this hungry family. What really bugs me is if you look at the water. Monty got to be famous because he was an amazing male osprey taking care of his responsibilities. He even went out in Storm Hector to fish! And Louis at Loch Arkaig fished at night for his three chicks and Aila. What is wrong with Wattsworth?

Those sweet little babies were cold and hungry. Electra eats off some of the old skin and begins to feed them. Today, their little buttoms look fatter because of all that fish they had yesterday.

I have to continue to remind myself that the chicks had big feedings yesterday after more than 24 hours without food (it was nearer to 36 hours). They have had one feeding today. Yes, they are hungry but they will survive unless they get cold and the rain hangs on. Tiny Tot went days on a hot nest without food. Tiny Tot has thrived but that was first due to Diane going fishing and making sure he was fed. Something happened on that nest that changed Diane’s attitude towards Tiny. Was it his second instance of charging at the older siblings? or was it his persistence at trying to find ways to eat? Tiny is a survivor.

This nest at Cowlitz needs food and it needs more twigs – a lot more along the sides so these babies don’t fall off. Was really proud of Electra yesterday when she kept eating and feeding the babies and holding on to that fish. She seems to know Wattsworth well but, still she has to depend on him to get them fish. She cannot leave her babies and let them get soaked. Their feathers will not keep them warm and dry yet.

Speaking of Tiny Tot. That kid hit the fish jackpot today. Jack has brought in three fish – THREE -. The first one was at 7:40:36 and the last one was 5:16:48. I can’t imagine what lit a fire under Jack but Tiny Tot is really enjoying all that food.

Here is Jack delivering that last fish. Tiny has earned it. The adult intruder was about today and Tiny got them off and away from the nest.

If you look closely you can see the big crop that Tiny already has. Wow. Three fish in a day. It has been a long time since Tiny had that much food.

Tiny wasted no time eating that fish. He is really aware that there are other Ospreys around and he doesn’t want to have it taken away. Oh, Tiny, you are going to sleep so well. I hope the two Cowlitz kids grow up as strong and remarkable as you.

I was not going to go and check on the Golden Eagles in Romania. The fact that a camera was installed on an active nest and that event frightened the father away does not sit well with me. That left a single mother and a chick. Still, I would love to see some success on this nest so once in awhile I check in. That mother is really a huntress. There is another fawn on the nest for the chick!

Just look at the crop on that little eaglet. Now that is what I wish for the Cowlitz Kids – so full of food every day they are about to pop. This eaglet is so lucky that predators haven’t been around while the mother is hunting.

Father Stork at the Black Stork nest in Southern Estonia seems to love to aerate the nest. Every time I check in he is doing some kind of nest maintenance. What a guy you are Karl II.

Things are stepping up at the White-Bellied Sea Eagle Nest in the Sydney Olympic Park. Dad and Lady have been doing nestorations for more than a month it seems. It looks like they are finalizing those. Dad is bringing fish to Lady and mating has happened. Now everyone is just sitting back and waiting for that first egg from this beautiful pair of WBSE.

Thinking about the Sea Eagles and that precious 26 from last year made me also begin to think about two other nests in Australia that will be ramping up for breeding season, too.

Solly from the Port Lincoln Osprey Barge, hatched in 2021, has given Osprey researchers a lot to think about with her satellite tracker. She is 267 days old today. On 11 June, she flew north from Eba Anchorage to Laura Bay. It must have been a reconnaissance flight as she returned to Eba that evening.

Meanwhile Mom is eating a fish on the barge at Port Lincoln.

And, wow, I said two nests but no – it is three. How could I have forgotten about the Collins Street Peregrine Falcons in Melbourne?! That is shameful. Those three girls – triplets – all born on the same day within hours were amazing. I have no idea how their little dad kept up with them. It is just a fantastic nest to watch. I love falcons! When the camera is up and running you will hear about it. There are four videos from last year posted on YouTube. Just Google CBD Falcons. Here is one of them. It is rather long. You can skip through it if you like or watch the entire thing. Aren’t those girls so cute looking up at mom?

Oh and the last is Izzi, Xavier and Diamond at the scrape box on the old water tower on the grounds of Charles Sturt University. It is a research project of Cilla Kinross. We are lucky enough for her to share the cameras and the daily lives of this great couple of Peregrine Falcons.

Yesterday, Diamond accepted prey from Xavier. This is a big deal – kind of like a marriage in the land of falcons. Xavier had made two previous failed attempts – today’s worked. Here is a short video of that prey exchange:

That is just a hop, skip, and a jump around some of the nests that we don’t always cover. As the fledges take place in North America, the action is just starting in the Southern Hemisphere. There is a lot to look forward to.

Thank you for joining me. Stay safe, stay well.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I grabbed my screen shots: Achieva Credit Union, Cowlitz PUD, Eagle Club of Estonia, WBSE Eagle Cam, BirdLife Australia and the Discovery Centre, Port Lincoln Osprey Project, and Asociatia Wild Bucovina. I would also like to thank the PLO for the FB page and the screen shot of Solly’s tracking map.

The Migratory Bird Acts – do they really protect the birds?

It has been a little over a week since the furor erupted at a local park in our City when a public utility company was clear cutting trees near a Cooper Hawks Nest. The outpouring of anger by residents and concerned citizens paused the clear cutting until fall when there would be no active nests. A victory for the birds!

Several of us were pretty certain that the migrating birds were protected under the Canadian Migratory Birds Convention Act of 1994 – an act originally passed in 1917 and updated in 1994 and 2005. But, we were wrong. Raptors are not protected under the federal act. They are protected by the Wildlife Act of Manitoba!

As Tracy at the Manitoba Peregrine Falcon Recovery Project reminded me:

The original Act was written to protect birds that migrated between Canada and the US and  were either a) beneficial (songbirds eating agricultural pests or waterfowl which were hunted) or b) harmless to humans (puffins for example).  Birds of prey – dead or alive, whole or their constituent parts – are generally protected under provincial and territorial Acts.  In Manitoba all vultures, eagles, ospreys, hawks, falcons and owls are designated as protected species under the Wildlife Act – the Act protects them, their nests and habitat.

As I sat reading Tracy’s words, I began staring at two books on my shelf. The first one was Rosalie Edge. Hawk of Mercy. The Activist who saved nature from the Conservationists and Winter’s Hawk. Both paint a picture of wanton killing of birds, not protecting them. Rosalie Edge will use her influence and money to establish a protective area in the United States called Hawk Mountain. She will take on Audubon and all the men she knows who love sport hunting and the bagging of raptors. What a woman. Hawk Mountain is the site where the thermals are so good and birds migrating from eastern Canada and the US pass through to get to their winter grounds. You can visit Hawk Mountain and you can go there and help count migrating raptors. Google it.

Rosalie Edge was a very special woman. She was not afraid of going against the establishment. Rachel Carson has often been given the credit for sounding the early alarm against DDT in her book, Silent Spring. In fact, it was Edge that was raising concerns fourteen years before Carson. Edge was a leader in seeing the need to really conserve the birds and protect them against humans.

The book is a good read. It shows the real attitudes towards birds at the turn of the century – the impact of sport hunting. Edge had the strong constitution to take on some of the most powerful men at the time and win. Hawk Mountain remains today a place of refuge for the migrating birds and, of course, my dear raptors. I am actually including provincial wildlife acts of Canada at the bottom of today’s blog. If you wish to read The Migratory Bird Act of Canada (MBAC) it can be accessed by Googling.

So lesson learned: When demanding protection for raptors in your province, you need to go to the provincial wildlife acts which I have included below!

I went to check on Little Tiny Bob at the Foulshaw Moss Nest in Cumbria. He has been getting stronger and growing the past few days. He also appears to have gained some confidence – a very good thing. We saw that in Tiny Tot as he began to get so clever in order to get food. Blue 35 has been doing really well feeding the trio. I am really proud of her and White YW keeps the fish coming in.

All of the Bobs were full. Little Tiny Bob just wanted to go to sleep and there was enough fish for mom to have a good meal, too. Any food insecurities seem to be dissipating on this nest. Yes! That is a good thing on a sunny Sunday afternoon.

Tiny Tot was waiting on the nest and hoping for a fish drop early this morning. Jack did not disappoint. He arrived with a fish at 7:40:36.

“Thanks, Dad!”

Jack took off and left Tiny to his fish. Tiny continued mantling. He knows there is an adult intruder in the area and he doesn’t want to loose his fish.

Sadly there has been no fish delivery at the Cowlitz PUD nest. Those babies have gone through all that food they ate yesterday. They were starving. They are once again food begging. Electra called out to Wattsworth for a long time. She left the nest and I thought she was returning with a fish for the babies but she wasn’t gone long enough – she came in with bark. Of course, Wattsworth had to come sniffing around. What a lazy Osprey! I guess Electra will have to leave the babies and go fishing again today if they are going to survive.

The babies were cold and crying for food.

No sooner than Electra had that piece of wood on the nest than Wattsworth appears thinking it was a fish. Does he have another family? Is he just a lazy osprey? Yes, I do believe that birds have individual characteristics. Or is he just completely inept? Reminds me too much of Louis and the way that he treats Iris on the Hellgate Nest. Thankfully the Ravens took Iris’s eggs this year before there could be any starving chicks.

While it is true that this nest needs some rebuilding on the sides, it surely needs fish to keep the babies alive so they actually need the crib sides!!!!! Wattworth – go fishing! You make me disappointed.

I always check on Tiny Tot, Little Tiny Tot, and the Ks every morning. This time I took a deep breath. I could only see one of the Ks at the very far end near a good spot to fledge. My mind was racing telling me that they are not ready to fledge yet. I had counted the rings on K1s tail and concluded that and yet, where are they??!!!!!!!!

At that moment I remembered that there is a second camera at the Cornell site. Well, it made me feel a little better. There all three of them were but one of them is over where Big Red has been standing – on the fledge ledge. It is going to be soon. Better watch these kids while there is time!

Thank you for joining me today. Send warm wishes, as always to those wee ones who need warmth and food – the Cowlitz Kids.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I grab my screen shots: Achieva Credit Union, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Cowlitz PUD, and Cornell Bird Lab RTH. Thank you to Tracy at the Manitoba Peregrine Recovery for pointing out the difference in the wildlife acts.

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Here is the wording for the Canadian provincial and territorial laws:

Birds in Canada are protected under provincial and territorial statute in addition to the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994. Please consult the legislation of the relevant jurisdiction before making any decisions regarding the protected status of a bird species in Canada. The following links are provided for convenience, but may not be current.

This table provides information on legislation of other jurisdictions regarding migratory birds in Canada.

Province/TerritoryLawURL
British ColumbiaWildlife ActBritish Columbia – Wildlife ActDesignation and Exemption Regulation: Schedules A and C
AlbertaWildlife ActAlberta – Wildlife ActWildlife Regulation, Schedule 4
SaskatchewanWildlife Act, 1998Saskatchewan – Wildlife Act (PDF; 155 KB)The Wildlife Regulations, 1981 (PDF; 216 KB)
ManitobaWildlife ActManitoba – Wildlife Act: Schedule A
OntarioFish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997Ontario – Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, 1997: Schedules 3, 7 and 8
QuebecAn Act Respecting the Conservation and Development of WildlifeQuebec – An Act Respecting the Conservation and Development of Wildlife
New BrunswickFish and Wildlife ActNew Brunswick – Fish and Wildlife Act
Nova ScotiaWildlife ActNova Scotia – Wildlife ActGeneral Wildlife Regulations
Newfoundland and LabradorWildlife ActNewfoundland and Labrador – Wildlife ActWildlife Regulations: Schedule B
Prince Edward IslandWildlife Conservation ActPrince Edward Island – Wildlife Conservation Act
NunavutWildlife ActNunavut Wildlife Act: Subsections 6(2) and 6(3)
Northwest TerritoriesWildlife ActNorthwest Territories – Wildlife ActBirds of Prey RegulationsWildlife General Regulations: Schedule General
Yukon TerritoryWildlife ActYukon Territory – Wildlife Act : Schedule H

Late Friday snippets from Cowlitz, Achieva, and Foulshaw Moss

I cannot but think that something terribly wrong is going on at the Cowlitz PUD Osprey Nest in Washington State. The two chicks, already undernourished, are crying out for food with their heads bent over in the middle of the nest. Electra is not there. Wattsworth has not brought in any fish. Perhaps something has happened to him but Electra has proven that she is a good fisher and she literally has two starving babies. They should be growing with fat little wings and bottoms and that is not happening. Why has she not gone to catch something?

It is 16 degrees C and partly cloudy where the nest is located. Thank goodness it is not the high temperatures in Florida right now or elsewhere in the United States. The Ospreys depend on the fish for their hydration but these days are critical for the wee ones. These two should have feedings every few hours – should have had since they were born – but haven’t.

For those who watched the Achieva Osprey Nest you might well remember the physical state that Tiny Tot was in at this stage. This can be turned around. Right now it would help if Electra would bring in a big fish for these two.

Electra is back on the nest brooding the two chicks. She is loudly calling Wattsworth. I wonder if something has happened to him? has he been injured like Aran was at Glaslyn and unable to fish? has something worse happened? Still, I would hope that Electra would go out and fish. It would be 7:40 pm there Friday night. If she does not go soon it will be too late. It is difficult to remember precisely when these two had something to eat. It was sometime yesterday. This is very, very disturbing.

I have seen no food today. There are the two little ones thinking Mom has returned with fish – but, sadly, she has nothing for them.

In St Petersburg, Florida, Tiny Tot got his fish. At 8:19:06 – after he had been food calling and watching – he took off from the nest. Jack must have flown by with a fish and made a drop for Tiny away from the nest. Maybe the adults will slowly wean Tiny off of getting fish on the nest.

In the image below Tiny Tot sees one of the adults with a fish. He is calling out loudly.

He immediately takes off to go and chase them and get that fish!

Tiny Tot returns at 8:49:29. The little bit of sunlight is quickly disappearing. Tiny Tot is not giving up any secrets as to how much of a crop he has or hasn’t. However, he was gone for approximately thirty minutes. He eats a lot faster than he did when he was younger so that could have been a nice size fish.

Tiny moves up to the perch at 8:54:27 where he will spend the night. Good Night Tiny. Happy Fish Dreams!

Meanwhile, Little Bob at the Foulshaw Osprey Nest is hanging in there. He had a really good feed today. Let’s hope this nest stays civilized and that none of us have to worry about this wee tiny tot again. Just look at the size difference between him and Big Bob the old meanie.

Thank you for joining me on this quick check in with these three Osprey nests. I wish there had been better news coming out of the Cowlitz Nest. Send all your warm wishes their way. It just feels like something has happened. Wattsworth wasn’t great at bringing in massive amounts of fish but he was delivering. It would simply be a tragedy if he is injured or has been killed. The fortunes -good or bad -on the nests can change as quickly as you can snap your fingers.

Thank you to the Cumbrian Wildlife Trust for their streaming cams where I got the shots of Little Bob and his two siblings. You can view them here:

https://www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife/cams/osprey-cam

Thank you to the Cowlitz PUD for their streaming cam where I grab the still images of Electra, Wattsworth, and the two chicks. Here is the link to that nest:

And thank you to the Achieva Credit Union in St Petersburg Florida for their streaming cam where I get my stills of Tiny Tot. Here is that link:

Tuesday Nest Hopping

Well, dear Tiny Tot did return to the Achieva Credit Union Osprey Nest this morning. Made me feel all joyful! He was on the perch and a bird buzzed him at 12:09:58. A full seconds later Tiny Tot leaves the perch. Was he in hot pursuit? Or was he just fed up being annoyed? The adult intruder had been on the nest earlier, too, when Tiny Tot was not there but it seems to be the Mockingbird that was a nuisance. Small birds love to annoy Big Birds. And how much longer will Tiny come to the nest? I wonder.

That adult intruder comes in every so often just to check things out. When Tiny arrives, it leaves! Tiny has made an impression – don’t mess with Tiny! Good.

Here comes Tiny heading for the perch at 11:07:27! You don’t see the adult Osprey – it took off the minute it saw Tiny arriving. Jack really does need to agree on a hefty amount of fish for this little one for securing the family nest all the time. :)))))

Oh, it is so nice to see you, Tiny Tot.

Tiny Tot is on the perch. If you look to the right and slightly up you will see the nuisance bird flying away from the nest.

Tiny flew off at 12:10:28 to the left.

Across the continent, Rosie is on the Whirley Crane nest in Richmond, California, with the trio. The chicks were banded on 4 June.

Isn’t that just a gorgeous location for a nest? Richmond is a great provider. This is their fifth season as parents. Rosie will stay around til the trio are well and truly fledged and independent then she will migrate. Richmond does not leave the area in the winter so he will be there helping the fledglings if necessary until they leave the territory.

Those white storks in Mlady Buky are really growing. Just miss a day and they look all grown up! And look how clean and dry they are. This is one of the best feel good stories of this year – it really is. I would love to wake up every morning and be surrounded by people who care about all living things.

Look carefully. You can see the throat pouch in the image below. Remember storks make a lot of sounds but they do not have vocal chords like songbirds. Instead, they clatter their bill together very, very fast and the noise resonates in this throat pouch making it much louder – like an amplifier.

Looking at how quickly these three are growing made me realize that I also need to check on Karl II and Kaia’s three storklings. They are the Black Storks in a nest in Southern Estonia.

Here is Kaia looking down at the three of them. Oh, I am so hoping that enough food arrives on this nest so that the little third hatch will survive. Kaia is a new mother and Karl II’s old mate, Kita, laid 5-7 eggs and they could not feed them all. Kita was known for tossing one or two of the small ones off the side of the nest. It is understandable when there is a food shortage but it looks like Karl II might have this under control and if Kaia only lays three eggs then they might fledge all their storklings without hardship.

Karl II and Kaia take turns feeding and watching the storklings. That is Kaia above. She has no bands on her legs – makes her easy to recognize. Those long legs help her wade through the long grasses and water in search of food.

Here comes Karl II. See his band. Kaia moves off the nest for her break to eat and forage for food for the storklings. So everything is just fine on this nest also. So far the day has been good for the birds I have checked on.

Taking turns.

In Wales, the camera operator gave everyone a good tour of the landscape that is the territory around the nest of Aran and Mrs G. For those of you unfamiliar, Mrs G is the oldest Osprey in the United Kingdom. She is 21. Her and Aran lost all three of their 2021 hatches due to Aran being injured while protecting the nest. He lost some primary feathers and could not fish. The community provided a fish table. Everyone ate but the wee ones not having food for 48 hours meant they could not be saved. Aran and Mrs G are getting their strength back and Aran is now flying much better. They are a strong established couple and will return next year from their African migration to try again.

Isn’t this just the most idyllic setting? There is a beautiful pond, an old stone fence along with cows and sheep. You can almost ‘hear’ the landscape!

All the rain made the Welsh countryside emerald green.

Now look carefully. Can you spot the Osprey?

Gorgeous landscape around the Glaslyn Osprey Nest.

The Two Bobs at the Rutland Manton Nest look almost as big as Maya and Blue 33 (11). Looks like it is time for some fish!

Blue 33 brings in a nice fish for Maya and the lads.

Now this image is really making me happy. The other day Idris got one of those mesh bags that holds produce – like oranges – caught on either his talons or a fish. It got into the nest with Telyn and the two Bobs. Thankfully no one was injured. The staff were watching it closely and if necessary, they would remove it. Otherwise they were going to wait to remove the mesh when the Bobs are banded at the end of the month.

Here is an image of the Two Bobs and the mesh the other day. You can imagine how worrying this was for everyone. You can also see the flat crops of each of the osplets, the down off their heads and the feathers growing in, and their deep amber eyes. They are in the reptile phase and for some, this is not so attractive as when they have either their natal down or their juvenile feathers. They really do remind us that Ospreys were around 50 million years ago – and as my son tells me – scientists only figured out that dinosaurs had feathers a few years ago so are they birds? or dinosaurs?

Another way that humans endanger wildlife is not disposing properly of our rubbish.

And this is today. Oh, what a relief. I hope someone finds that mesh and disposes of it properly.

Mesh is gone fron the Dyfi nest! Yeah.

Wattsworth has brought in a really nice fish to Electra on the Cowlicks PUD Osprey Nest in Washington State. I sure hope she takes the time to feed each oproperly. There was an awful lot of aggression on this nest yesterday and I am going to put it flatly on Electra for the lack of feeding when she had fish in hand on Sunday.

Wattsworth delivers a big fish – now feed your babies til they are bursting Electra!

And speaking of little bobs – oh, my. The third hatch at Foulshaw Moss of White YW and Blue 35 is really a wee lad. Everything is fine as long as food is not around but there is also a lot of aggression and it seems that there needs to be more fish delivered. Come on White YW!

Bob Three is really so tiny. He is cuddled up with sibling 2 having a nap. Of course sibling 1 is so big that it wants all the food but – Bob 3 is still here with us today and that is a good day in my books.

Wee little hatch 2 at Foulshaw Moss Nest in Cumbria.

The only child of Dylan and Seren is just in fish heaven. Growing up with no competition, s/he will need the parents to help it understand how to survive in the wild – the fight for the fish! I wonder if they will do that?? Certainly Bald Eagles train their only eaglets by pretending to be surrogate siblings. Samson did a wonderful job with Legacy on the Northeast Florida nest in Jacksonville.

All that chartreuse is moss. The first time I looked I thought it was another mesh bag. Is it just me or does this nest need some tidying?

And my last check in, the two Bobs up at Loch of the Lowes with Laddie LM12 and Blue NC0. Gosh. They are looking good, too.

It is so nice to stop in and find that everyone seems to be doing alright on a Tuesday. No telling what Wednesday will bring but for now, these birds are surviving.

I want to thank ‘S’ for writing to me and telling me that Tiny Tot had returned to the nest. It is much appreciated as are all your letters. Tomorrow I am going to explain something I learned today – the difference between the Migratory Birds Treaty of 1917-18 and the Wildlife Protection Acts of each individual province including my own.

Thank you for joining me. Smile. It is a great day.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen shots: Mlady Buky, Eagle Club of Estonia, Scottish Wildlife Trust and Loch of the Lowes, Dyfi Osprey Project, LRWT and Rutland Water, Clywedog Osprey Project, Carnyx Wild, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Achieva Credit Union, Bwyd Gwyllt Glaslyn Wildlife Trust, Cowlitz PUD, and Golden Gate Audubon.

Is Tiny Tot gone forever?

Today might well turn out to be a sad day for everyone who grew to admire and love Tiny Tot, the third hatch of Jack and Diane at the Achieva Credit Union Osprey nest in St Petersburg, Florida.

The day began as it normally does with one exception – Tiny guarded the nest but there was no fish delivery.

Indeed, there was no fish delivery to our little Braveheart until 7:06:05 pm.

Tiny mantled the fish. There were no intruders or sibling #2 about. Jack took off immediately after Tiny had that fish in its talons.

Tiny ate the fish on the nest. The other day he had moved it up to the perch pole to eat but, tonight he decided to stay on the nest. After eating the fish, he flew up to the perch post. He appeared to be ‘antsy’ – it is the only possible word I could use to describe him. He scratched his legs, flapped and unflapped his wings and generally looked like someone on edge. He certainly wasn’t his usual relaxed self when there are no intruders around the nest.

Flapping and unflapping.

At 8:32:30, Tiny Tot flew off the perch.

This is the last shot I have of him. He is a blur.

Any other time, Tiny Tot would have returned to the nest for the night but tonight, he did not do that. This is the first night that he has not slept at the natal nest. It might not mean anything. He might have decided to roost in a nearby tree. There is always, however, the chance that he will not return to the nest tomorrow.

Stay posted. I will be checking on Tiny Tot throughout the day. I will also be checking on the pair of White-Bellied Sea Eagles whose nest is in an Ironbark Tree in the Sydney Olympic Park. They have finished their nestorations and people are hoping for an egg by the middle of the month! Wow. The Pittsburg Hayes eaglets are getting ready to fledge and the pair at The Landings continue to get more height. There is some concern about the bonking that has started on the Cowlitz Nest. Electra needs to fill those two up when she has fish on the nest, not let Wattsworth remove it. As well, the little one on the Foulshaw Moss nest in Cumbria is having some issues. All of that tomorrow.

Thank you for joining me. Stay safe and well.

Thanks to the Achieva Credit Union for their streaming cam. That is where I took my screen shots. Your camera has brought joy to so many this season!

Tiny Tot. The Reigning Achieva Nest Champion

Tiny Tot had just received his breakfish when a juvenile came on the nest wanting that fish. Tiny Tot was not having it. Is this the same juvie that did take a fish one day? Hard to tell. There are supposedly thirty Osprey nests in and around St Petersburg so there could be lots out hunting for a free meal.

Tiny Tot has really earned his street fighting stripes on this nest. He was valiant fighting that juvie off while keeping that fish tight in his talon.

Tiny Tot had just finished his fish and had taken a short breath and all the action started again. This time it was him against a juvenile and and an adult.

Tiny Tot leapt from the perch to battle that same juvenile intruder. You can tell the juveniles easily because they have white tips on all their feathers. Then the adult intruder joined in.

Tiny never gives up and at 10:11:26 he is victorious and both of the intruders are dispersed, for now. Yeah for Tiny!

I wish Tiny had a Darvin ring on his leg. This is one Osprey that really needs to be followed. There he was almost starved to death, fighting for morsels of fish, going without for 12 days of food in total between when he hatched and he began to get regular feedings from Diane. He is a ‘tiny’ three that grew into a magnificent bird just like Z1 Tegid of the ‘white egg’ over on the Dyfi Nest.

Z1 or Tegid is a 2016 hatch. The famous Monty was his father. It goes back to that same old ‘survival of the fittest’. Everyone thought that Z1’s older sister would be the survivor. She died shortly after she hatched. Z1 returned from his migration and has raised his own chicks on a nest in Wales for the last two seasons, including this one. Isn’t he a really handsome bird? Notice the whiskers under his chin? If you followed Tiny you will know that he had whiskers, too. My friend, ‘T from Strasbourg’ used to laugh about Tiny’s whiskers. She is the one that told me about Tegid. So..it seems that these last hatches can become real street fighters since they had to endure and survive such abuse on the nests. That is a good reason never to give up on them. It is also a good reason for banding. You can see Tegid’s Blue Darvin ring with Z1. He is easily recognized.

There are just so many positive reasons to ring the birds and that way we would know for sure if Tiny returns in a couple of years and claims this nest as his with his own mate. Personally I think he would be able to ward off Jack.

Ah, but today we celebrate. Tiny Tot got to eat his morning fish and in two separate incidents he defended this nest – first against a juvie and secondly against a juvie and an adult. Wow. Cheers all around for Tiny Tot.

Thanks for joining me this morning. It has cooled off a bit on the Canadian prairies and we got some rain – much needed. I hope everyone is well. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to the Achieva Credit Union where I grabbed my screen shots and short videos and The Loch Arkaig FB page where I grabbed the shot of Z1.

Bird World Headlines: Tiny Tot defends the nest again, Fauci makes his first aerial prey exchange, will little Zuri survive?

Just when you think everything is going to be ‘normal’ in Bird World and there will not be any drama, it turns. Honestly, those parents of Tiny Tot’s should be giving him a life lease for the Achieva Credit Union nest since he is the only one protecting it. If you are beginning to think the adult intruder returned, you are right! At 1:00:18 Tiny Tot starts alarming and flapping. Nothing gets by this little one. He watches and looks every direction – he continues alarm calling and flapping his wings.

At 1:30:51 Tiny Tot is up on the perch.

And then Tiny Tot flies back to the nest. At 1:39:36 the adult intruder tries landing on the nest. Tiny Tot thwarts their effort getting them off balance.

The adult tries but cannot make landing on the perch. Tiny Tot was successful.

The adult gets their wings and legs together and flies between the nest and the perch. Looks like they are going to go around again. Tiny Tot is alarming at them.

And off she goes.

Tiny Tot is alarming, mantling, and flapping its wings at the same time. He means business. That adult is not going to land on his nest.

Here comes the intruder.

This time around the adult intruder makes a successful landing on the perch. They do not try to attempt a landing on the nest with Tiny Tot there.

The adult perches calmly. You would think by looking at them that they belong to this nest but they do not. It is Tiny’s.

The stand off between Tiny Tot and the adult intruder we on until 2:50 when the adult intruder decided to fly off the perch. Tiny Tot took flight and is chasing that adult out of the territory of the nest! The image below shows Tiny in hot pursuit of that adult.

Tiny Tot is now on sentry duty like his dad, Jack, the other day. Good luck Tiny!

Every day Tiny Tot’s talents for defending the nest have been tested. The third hatch of Jack and Diane is really gaining valuable experience and so far he is doing well. What does the adult intruder want? the nest? or to try and steal one of Tiny’s fish deliveries from Jack?

At the 21:00 feeding on the Urdaibai Nest, Zuri had its beak open wide with the other two siblings. I wish Landa had fed the little Zuri straightaway. I fear that it doesn’t have the energy to stand up yet.

Sadly it appears that Zuri didn’t stay turned around with its beak wide open for Landa. Zuri had some food five hours earlier before the rain. It is really unclear what will happen to this little one.

It is still cold and damp and that will be the last feeding for the day.

This is so incredible. You have to see it rather than seeing screen shots. The video is 51 seconds long and it shows Fauci, the first eyas of Annie and Grinnell to fledge, taking its dinner from its parent in mid-air. Watch how Fauci flies afterwards and look at the parent. This kid is amazing! And just so you know – he watched his parents but this is the FIRST time Fauci has ever done a prey exchange! Way to go Super Star Fauci!

https://fb.watch/5UZd5WLGfQ/

Thank you for stopping in on this brief report on Tiny Tot, our little Braveheart, Fauci, and little Zuri. For Tiny, the day started out so well with an early fish delivery and now the afternoon Tiny had to defend the nest. He did an amazing job. And across the United States in California, Annie and Grinnell’s eyases are learning all of the tricks to being a Peregrine Falcon, the fastest bird in the world. Poor little Zuri doesn’t have a lot of strength. Warm wishes go over to Spain for this little one to make it.

Thanks to the Achieva Credit Union for their streaming cam where I grabbed these screen shots.