Late Monday news in Bird World

8 August 2022

The condolences continue to pour into Poole Harbour for the loss of 5H2 due to the goshawk attack and to Loch Garten’s 1C1 to unknown causes. It is worse when the osplets are older and flying. The number of Osprey in the UK is very small compared to North America and the loss of these two chicks on significant nests took its toll today. Last year the osplets died due to weather issues when they were so little. This year we lost a wee one at Llyn Brenig, the third hatch at Loch Arkaig when its foot caught and it could not get under Mum during the worst weather. Siblicide at Loch of the Lowes. It is hard either way but raising chicks to fledge and then losing them is just tragic.

I have had many letters asking if Loch Garten is doing a post-mortem. Yes, they are! The cameras will be turned off during the removal of the chick and then turned back on. We have seen three ‘mysterious’ deaths this year on streaming cams of Ospreys -Big at Captiva, Molate at SF Bay, and now 1C1 at Loch Garten. I included Big because there was no confirmation of why she died. Molate was visibly unwell for a few days, just like 1C1. Is it the same? (It is unclear to me as to whether GG Audubon ever removed Molate’s body from the grid as fledglings Brooks and the Visitor continue to come to the nest. Speculation is a lung infection. I do recall Molate also had trouble breathing. Curious.

Elsewhere in Bird World, life seems reasonably stable but everything can change in a few seconds – without any warning – as was the case of H52.

The great experiment by Urmas and Dr Madis to save the Black storklets of Jan and Janika would have been significant if not for the loss of all the chicks on Eedi’s nest due to predation (possibly another Goshawk attack). There is one survivor, Bonus. Bonus is doing tremendously well. He is 78 days old today. Karl II and Kaia have found the filled fish baskets and the chicks are so full that when Karl II comes in with a delivery the four of them cannot eat all the fish. Yes, it is true!

Fledging could come at any time. Bonus is overdue but because of his delayed development due to stress and lack of food, he will fly once he is ready, not by a calendar. Kaia often leaves by 11 August so we are watching to see what will happen this year.

It is mostly quiet. Many of us are watching the females in the UK to spot on leaves when. Maya is still at Manton Bay in Rutland.

I could not get a good look at her face but this is that amazing female who raised three big girls with Blue 33 this year! She is the mother of Telyn at Dyfi.

1H3 has enjoyed a nice fish delivery today.

1H1 is screaming to goodness for Mum or Dad to get a fish on the nest for her!!!!!!!!! What a beauty.

All of the fledglings could catch their own fish. The parents do not have to teach them – 60 million years is hardwired into their DNA. The fledglings just do not know that they can do it! During migration they will have to begin to fiend for themselves.

These females are such characters. Blue 33 could hear his girl across the lake! “I want a fish now!” Blue 33 is one of my great loves as far as ospreys go. He is 11 years old this year and is ending his 9th breeding season. He has raised two sets of four osplets to fledge with Maya…They are a super couple in a realm of their own.

Remember that flapping fish that we thought had killed at least one of the little ones – they survived. All three nice big girls!

It is hot at the Dyfi nest in Wales of Idris and Telyn. Tomorrow it will be 30 C. Telyn is still here. She has been chasing off an intruder which appears to be annoying her to no end. I do not blame her. Now is not the time for an injury. Telyn will leave Wales and fly to The Gambia. According to Chris Woods who travels to The Gambia in the winter, he knows precisely where her favourite perch is. Brilliant. It is always reassuring to know she has arrived safely.

Just look at all the cameras.

Relaxing down by the Dyfi River.

Emyr Evans has posted a very interesting blog testing different hypotheses about the unringed visitor to the Dyfi Nest. It has some information about fledging ages and the start of migration. Thanks EE – we love the Dyfi Data!

https://www.dyfiospreyproject.com/blog/emyr-mwt/extremely-rare-visitor-unringed-fledgling

I see no word that Blue NC0 has left the Loch of the Lowes either. Both chicks have been flying for at least 3 weeks and they are doing some fancy landings and take offs from the nest. I was able to catch them on the nest today – one with a fish and the other screaming to Laddie LM12 (Dad) to bring another pronto! These males sure get a work out at the end of the season. No wonder their legs are so strong and muscular.

These two look to be in brilliant shape!

Mrs G is still here. She is on the perch to the left while Aran is on the one at the right.

Aran and Mrs G looking out on their territory from the Glaslyn nest. Aran is in the back, Mrs G, the oldest osprey in the UK, is in the front.

Fledgling eating a fish on the Glaslyn nest while Mrs G is at the nest.

I cannot read the Darvic rings but this looks like a different fledgling enjoying a meal earlier in the day.

I was also able to catch Seren and one of the chicks on the Llyn Clywedog nest in Wales. It is so rare to see chicks on the nest that I feel fortunate checking all of the nests and finding at least one today.

Dorcha and the two fledgling chicks were on Loch Arkaig! I did not see Louis but he is about bringing in fish.

This one desperately wants a fish!

They do not know that they are getting ready for the most challenging two years of their lives. If they live to get to the South of England or parts thereabouts, they will feed up. There are scores of birds that will be at Poole Harbour making their way to their winter homes. How many of them will survive? When we hear averages, it must be the entire raptor family, not just specific species. We know that the UK birds will either land on the Iberian Peninsula and winter or they will continue to Africa and winter in The Gambia and Senegal. I hope to get some figures for Ospreys only. It will be easy to get UK figures of 2 year survival – or thereabouts – as from the Dyfi note – all known birds have Darvic Rings except for a few nests in Scotland and maybe one hiding in Montgomeryshire in Wales. The figure is going to be low and it could provide us with more insights. Less than 1 in 3 I suspect.

Remember – send me the stories you remember about migration. I am particularly interested in the huge challenges these birds face. Get it to me by Thursday night. Thanks!

I peeked in at the Osoyoos and Fortis Exshaw nest briefly throughout the day. The heat dome is definitely hitting BC again but Soo and Olsen seem to be weathering it fine. I have also checked on Titi who has been hovering but has not fledged. Titi is in a very dangerous position if he cannot fly – he is literally the sitting osprey for that Goshawk that continues to fly around the nest! I wonder why he is not moving? We saw Nuppu try to beak her youngest to fly. Titi has no mother, only a sibling and Dad and he needs to work those wings and get out of there.

The latest updates on Victor came on 3 August. If you missed it, here it is. There has been nothing since. We must assume that Victor is continuing to progress. Treatments for heavy lead toxicity take a long time.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or posts where I took my screen captures: Finnish Osprey Foundation, The Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch Arkaig and the Woodland Trust, CarnyXWild, LRWT, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Wildlife Trust.

Sad news from the UK

8 August 2022

It is a beautiful sunny day with clear skies on the Canadian Prairies but it is raining tear drops in the UK this morning.

This is a very early posting – longer one for this evening – to acknowledge the loss and sorrow. The chicks at Poole Harbour made history when their eggs were laid, when they hatched, and then fledged. It is a great loss. Sadly, the Goshawks are also being reintroduced. Their are formidable enemies of the osprey if you have ever witnessed an attack.

H52 the osplet that was attacked by the Goshawk on the Poole Harbour nest has, sadly, died.

The attack that took H52’s life:

At the Loch Garten nest, IC1 passed away this morning after being ill for a couple of days.

IC1 watching IC2 return from a flight yesterday.

Condolences go out to both Loch Garten and Poole Harbour – to the Osprey families and all their followers. This is just tragic news in a growling list of young osprey deaths in 2022.

Thank you for joining me. I am so sorry to bring you such sad news.

Thank you for their streaming cams where I took these screen captures.

Late Sunday in Bird World

7 August 2022

It was a lovely trip to a small town on the Canadian Prairies to check out waterfowl – which turned out not to be Greater Yellow Legs – but, a small variety of ducks. What is so nice and relaxing is a single area around Crescent Lake and Island Park. There are walking and biking paths as well as benches to look out over the water and watch the ducks. It was beautiful and quiet, something someone living in a big city does not realize they need until they are sitting surrounded by the sound of hardly anything.

As it was nearing dusk, the water glistened with silver striations. The ducks were quite camouflaged. You could only spot them when they were moving. All of the bird ID technology available to me identifies this as a pair of Common Goldeneye. They were about 100 m or 328 ft away.

The duck in front with its wings raised preparing to fly is a female. She has a chocolate brown head, lighter grey breast. You can sometimes see a thin white collar.

This Eared Grebe was finding food and feeding this little one. It had two with it and this is a male.

This cute little female Wood Duck with her tear-shaped eye-ring did not seem to mind having her picture taken.

The Duck at the back of the group is a Northern Pintail. She almost fooled me but her bill is grey while that of the Mallard in the front right is orange. The Pintail does not have the eye line of the Mallard either.

Another American Pintail on the rock.

The American Coot came along and stood on one of two large stones at the edge of the marshy area. If you look carefully you can see the black ring at tip of the white bill. Coots have red eyes, long green-yellow legs and a charcoal grey plumage all over their body.

Mallards.

What surprised me the most was the fact that there were recently hatched ducklings! I started counting the months til they would migrate and began wondering what on earth. It is possible that they will not fly away for winter. There is a river called the Assiniboine that is south of Crescent Lake. There are several dozen ducks that remain on that river near to where my daughter lives in Winnipeg.

The way that the ducks camouflage themselves in the reeds was simply remarkable – just like the striations on the river in the evening when you cannot see them.

It was a lovely day away and it was nice to get home having the Crows complain that all the peanuts and cheesy sausages were gone!

It was nice to come home to have an update about the Poole Harbour Ospreys. Here is the official announcement if you have not seen it.

CJ7 and H51 along with Blue 022 have now been on the nest. These images are from the 6th.

H51 eating a fish.

CJ7 came in with a fish for H51. They will be careful of the nest now that they know there is a Goshawk in the area. Just like Ospreys are being introduced so are Goshawks. These Ospreys then will always need to take great care.

The family is not sleeping on the nest at night.

Annie and Alden certain are enjoying their quiet time when Lindsay and Grinnell Jr don’t pop out of a corner chasing them. This is a four-minute bonding ritual complete with many kisses! If this doesn’t put a smile on your face, I do not know what would. They start off with what appears to be a conversation or a long permission to enter the scrape and amp it up from there.

The Sea Eaglet chicks have crossed over that stage of beaking and bopping and are now teasing one another.

This is just too funny!

Then a beak kiss. Lady just takes it all in stride. Notice that their crops are rather full and squishy providing the perfect cropillow.

The pin feathers can be seen much easier on the eaglets today.

There were six feedings on the Black Stork nest in the Karula National Forest of Karl II and Kaia. The storklets have been jumping and hovering and preening as well as eating. In fact they ate really well today.

The storklings can tell that an adult is approaching with food. They begin their begging dance which helps to stimulate the parent to bring up the food.

Karl II delivers a lot of fish. The basket must have been replenished.

Bonus is 77 days old today. Under normal conditions, Bonus would have fledged. Urmas believes that maybe it is delayed development due to a lack of food. The longest recorded time to first flight for Black Storks comes from China at 76 days. Bonus broke a record! The record for earliest fledge is 56 days (Saxony). Generally the chicks fledge before the female leaves for migration. But will this happen this year? Kaia left on 11 August last year. When they leave we must send them positive thoughts – it is a long, long journey through an area of war. I wonder what the nature refuge at Odessa looks like? was it shelled? or just the port area?

Titi at the Janakkalan nest has been really eating and growing – he seems to have caught up with Boris in size in a couple of days. He has not fledged and both osplets hatched on the same day. I wonder if the difference in feeding – like that with Little Bit 17 and Bonus – has really impacted his development too? All of us were aware that Boris was getting much more but how much we could not easily measure.

Titi hovering.

I understand that Titi is now sleeping alone on the nest while Boris is perched in the trees – near Dad?

The Osoyoos Osplets of Soo and Olsen are still on the nest! Whenever you go away you hope that chicks do not fledge but — that can’t be controlled! You also hope to come home and have all safely in the nest just as it was when you left. The family continues to deal with the heat domes they have experienced. This is the second one. It is currently 36 F and will climb to 38 tomorrow. It seems Olsen is still able to find fish.

Love and Peace remain on the nest at Glacier Gardens. They should be branching soon. Love and Peace will not migrate. They will remain in Alaska where they will feed off the local Salmon just like their sibling, Kindness, from 2021.

If we want everyone to respect nature and wildlife we have to make an effort to educate them, to get them to ‘love’ and ‘respect’ the birds like we do, to get them to understand their challenges — and to get them involved. Port Lincoln Osprey just posted an event that is intent on doing just that!

It looks like Mum and Dad at Port Lincoln Osprey Barge could become grandparents this year. This is Calypso on the left watching her mate eat a fish…I presume he knows that he is supposed to feed her, right? Calypso was the 2020 hatch with Star. Star has not been seen. —— She is Ervie’s sister. Gosh, I wish there was word about Bazza and Falky.

It is a very foggy morning on the grounds of Charles Sturt University in Orange, Australia. You can just see the trees below the water tower where the scrape of Xavier and Diamond is located.

The fog goes away quickly. Diamond looks out over her territory. We should be having eggs in what? 3 weeks?

There is news that L3 is doing well with her flight training. That is great news. L2 has been hanging out with Big Red and Arthur learning more hunting techniques. I do not have an update on L4 but I am assuming that the soft tissue injury will heal rather quickly. The Boathouse was back on ‘Highlights’ so if you go there to check on the three osplets just make sure you look down at the left corner….Highlights often shows an empty nest! Good way to get a heart attack. :))))

Thank you for joining me this evening for a quick check up on the birds. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams, FB posts where I took my screen captures: Friends of Poole Harbour, Cal Falcons, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre Sydney Olympic Park, Port Lincoln Osprey Project, Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender, Osoyoos Ospreys, Finnish Osprey Foundation, Charles Sturt University falcon cam, and Glacier Gardens.

When feather loss is nothing short of beautiful!

6 August 2022

I am up writing this short blog after midnight. The weather has turned agreeable in a place where I desperately want to go and check out the shorebirds. I am not an early morning person like so many of my birding friends who rejoice in getting out to see the latest arrivals before 0600. Tomorrow, however, I plan to leave early for me which means…I need to check on our feathered friends on line sooner! I am also awake because of the worry over Poole Harbour and the attack. How is the family?

First of all ——– let’s have a shout out and a drum, roll. Stephen Basly understands that we will not be 100% certain that the fledgling photographs contain Little Bit ND17 without a clear view of THE BALD PATCH. It is only now that I want to thank ND16 because this is complete proof that our Little Bit is flying and is doing well. It is nearly three weeks since Little Bit was released. He is definitely eating – whether or not he is catching some of his prey or having it delivered is not clear and — is now utterly irrelevant. What a relief…Thank you Stephen Basly for keeping an eye out for this amazing juvenile for all of us.

I had a question and it refers to Finnish Osprey nest #4 but, in fact, it applies to all Osprey nests post-fledge. The reader was worried that neither parent had shown up on the nest with UNA.

We are going to begin to see the nests being empty for a lot more time than when they are occupied now. It is always worrisome. We do not know if something has happened to the parents and/or the chicks. More often than not everything is good. It is a natural progression. The adults initially feed their fledglings on the nest. Sometimes both parents bring food to the nest for the chicks…we have also seen this at the stork nests with Karl II and Kaia both feeding their four and also with Bukacek and Betty. At some point, the adults might begin feeding the fledglings ‘off nest’. Big Red prefers, after the eyases fledge, to only feed them off the nest. She first feeds them on a flat roofed building called Rice directly across Tower Road from the nest. Sometimes she gives in to feeding on the nest and Arthur likes to sneak food there! At some point the female disengages from feeding the fledglings. Dad takes over completely allowing the female to bulk up her weight and add some fat before she begins her migration. The chicks will continue to be fed by Dad. Then they will feel the call to fly and they will start a journey to a place they have never seen which will become their forever winter home. The males leave last – only once they are assured the fledglings have all departed.

The #4 nest is mostly empty now. I have caught UNA there a few times but no prey deliveries. The chick appears fine and can fly quite well. It does not appear that there is any cause for worry.

The absence from the nest might also lie with the fact that a Goshawk attacked it. Just as you will see that the Ospreys at Poole Harbour are stressed about returning to the nest – and have not so far.

Daylight is just coming to the Poole Harbour nest.

No one slept on the nest last night. None of the family members have been seen on camera since the attack including Dad, Blue 022, and the other fledgling, 5H1.

Here are two stills from the attack on the Poole Harbour fledgling who is eating a fish on the nest. In the first one you will see CJ7’s head and her talons extending in front of her from the top left. The fledgling kind of melts into CJ7’s image. You can see the intruder (dark shape) also on the left – at 0900 on the nest.

In the image below, from left to right: the fledgling 5H2, the goshawk staring at the throat of the fledgling. The goshawk appears to have at least one leg and talons in the side of the nest. Some people have thought that it had its right talon in the wing of the fledgling. That is not really clear from the image. That right foot might also be caught in the rim of the nest pushing the primary feathers of the fledgling outward. CJ7 is on the far right. It is possible that she has one of the talons on the left food catching the goshawk’s wing. The talons of CJ7’s right foot seem to be embedded in tip of the goshawk’s wing – but this could just be the camera angle. This attack takes place in a couple of seconds – not even a minute. Was the goshawk successful? That really is unclear. Everyone went tumbling from the nest. It is very hard to wait to find out what has happened.

MORNING UPDATE FROM POOLE HARBOUR: The fledgling 5H2 was located alive with an injury to its flank. It has been taken into care. Blue 022 and CJ7 were located and they are alright. They are monitoring for 5H1. Here are the announcements:

The latest news.

Camera glitches when the chicks are near fledgling cause a lot of stress. Thankfully the camera on the Boathouse Osprey platform is once again working. The change in the three osplets is remarkable. Dory looks so tiny next to Schooner, Slapjack, and Sloop. ‘H’ has reminded me that they are 49, 48, and 46 days old today. We are nearing fledge watch.

Soo and the chicks at the Osoyoos nest have weathered another day – thankfully not such a hot one but others are coming. The chicks have been fed and also practiced some self-feeding. We are some days away from fledge.

Fish deliveries continue on a nice pace at the Fortis Exshaw nest. The parents have been going on and off the perch today. If you watch eagles, you will know that ‘branching’ is the first step to fledging. I wonder if the adults are showing the osplets the perch for the same reason?

While Mrs G is both a grandmother and a great-grandmother, Glaslyn was so happy to announce that Mrs G current mate is now a grandfather. His female chick of the 2018 season KS1 (middle chick) has fledged two chicks this year at the Bolton Estate in Yorkshire with her unringed mate. Well done! Here is the official announcement:

What the announcement does not tell you is that this is the first time since 1800 that osprey chicks have hatched at Bolton! 222 years. Incredible. They made the news with photos of the two grand chicks.

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/environment/first-osprey-chicks-recorded-in-yorkshire-since-1800-hatch-at-wensleydales-bolton-castle-estate-in-landowners-dream-come-true-3795431?fbclid=IwAR2AJF2zV0GGoz3xTLz8-TwEqV77gAznHdTfS7sdCz8ehFRoPeV3EoWSzOQ

If you are waiting for the banding of QT chick on Taiaroa Head, it will now take place Tuesday August 9 – Australian dates.

The Mispillion Harbour Ospreys have been given names. The adult female is Della and the adult male is Warren working its way into the state where the Osprey nest is located, Delaware. The two chicks are Bay (eldest) and River (youngest) representing the Bay and the inlet where the two chicks were raised this year. Super meaningful names. Thank you ‘H’ for always going the extra mile to get this nest noticed – and the family loved.

Next year, ‘H’ is going to start a Facebook group for this wonderful Osprey family. So everyone remembers this nest – the Mum loves yellow! ‘H’ has dressed them up.

While Lindsay was resting on the ledge of The Campanile she had a visitor – Alden! Oh, how precious. Be sure to also check out moon_rabbit-rising Instagram’s account for recent photos of Annie hunting in the area.

Thank you for joining me this morning. Like so many of You I stayed up waiting for news of Poole Harbour. Wishing 5H2 a quick recovery! I am heading off to areas west to check on shore birds. I hope to have my regular report on Sunday. Take care. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cam, Tweets, or FB postings where I took my screen captures: Mispillion Harbour Ospreys and ‘H’, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Notre Dame Eagles, Fortis Exshaw, Osoyoos Ospreys, Audubon Explore, Birds of Poole Harbour, Finnish Osprey Foundation, and Cal Falcons.

Goshawk attacks Poole Harbour osprey fledgling

5 August 2022

CJ7and Blue 022with 5H1 and 5H2 on 23 July 2022

Goshawks seem to wait until the osplets have nearly fledged or fledged to attack the nest. We saw this at nest #4 when Nuppu’s osplet who had yet to fledge was knocked off the nest and is presumed to be predated. We saw Goshawk attacks last year ending in the death of some adult ospreys and older chicks.

CJ7 and Blue 022 made history in Poole Harbour first by laying eggs, then hatching, and then fledgling two beautiful Ospreys – 5H1 and 5H2. Everything seemed to be going well.

Then the Goshawk attacked the nest a few minutes ago. CJ7 was perched on a nearby tree and flew in to engage the hawk intend on taking one of her chicks who was feeding on the nest. The fate of the chick, 5H2, remains unknown as I write this as does the fate of CJ7. It appears – in slomotion – that CJ7 had her talon in the goshawk and the hawk had its talon in 5H2. The nest is empty. It is hoped that they were able to get free and fly away safely.

Here is the amount of time it took to disrupt this nest by the predator. You absolutely can’t blink it is that quick. It began at 20:12:40.

Someone on chat asked who would win the fight. Unfortunately the Ospreys talons are not made for fighting but I am certain -since CJ7 waited so long to have a family -that she will fight viscously. We wait and hope.

Birds of Pool Harbour are on site and checking the situation. It is dark and there is not word on the Ospreys.


In other news, ‘H’ sent me a note that the camera at the Boathouse Ospreys is now working again. Thanks ‘H’.

Monday morning in Bird World

25 July 2022

Oh, good morning everyone! Still some fledging going on in the UK, osplets getting their ‘legs’ in the US, another video of Little Bit…it is starting off as a good week. Fingers and toes crossed.

At the Sea Eagles nest in the old Ironbark Tree, Lady seems to have gotten into a pattern of feeding SE 29 and 30 every hour. Lady’s job at this stage of the eaglet’s development is to brood and feed the chicks. Dad is in charge of hunting and guarding the nest. The chicks will grow quickly. When they are 3-4 weeks old, Lady will stop brooding them at night and sleep perched on the tree. Fledging takes place between 75-85 days, normally.

So,, we must enjoy every moment of these two little white snow balls. What can we expect in weeks 2 and 3? You will continue to notice how their beaks are growing longer. It is hard to imagine but they will start to crawl out of the nest cup during week 2. You will also notice they have started to squirt their ‘ps’ over the side of the nest. No potty training for these two – it is instinctual. By week 3 they will be double their size at hatch and they will become interested in things around them. They will be eating bigger flakes of fish and pieces of prey and, of course, they will have mastered getting those bites into their beak from Lady much better than in the early days.

It is the most beautiful golden morning in Finland at the Janakkalan Osprey nest. The two chicks are sound asleep.

It is an equally beautiful morning in Mlade Buky, The Czech Republic as the sun comes over the distant hills. You can see the four storklets on the natal nest in the foreground. Now look carefully at the top image. In the middle ground, there is the finished ‘home’ that Bukacek was building for him and Betty. The storklets can flap all they want — and they are beginning to work those wings. It would be a little crowded there with six on that nest!

Sorry. It is so dark there but look carefully and you will see the adults in their own private space!

All four storklets at the nest of Karl II and Kaia in the Karula National Forest in Estonia are doing splendid. Like the White Storks above, these four are starting to work their wings as well.

There were only 2 feedings for the storklets on 24 July. From the discussion forum, it appears that the fish baskets need filling or some other bird species is eating them. It also appears that there is not enough fish in the natural sources… let us all hope that the baskets are filled and Karl II and Kaia find all that food and eat themselves and feed their four very large storklets.

The three fledglings of Ivo and Iiris are doing well although some of their take offs and landings need a little adjustment. Ivo is delivering really nice size fish to the nest and each waits their turn for another delivery if they missed an earlier one. The nest is located in Southern Estonia near Tartumaa. Nearby is a fish farm as well as a river and some ponds. It would appear from the deliveries that there is plenty of fish for this family of 5.

Ivo has enjoyed the head of this fish. He has a very nice crop. Thanks, Dad.

Another video of the area of the Notre-Dame Eagles – and a most welcome one. It shows where they are and where you can ‘view’ them without doing harm. The individual filming will point the camera to the trees. Squint – look hard. There is at least one fledgling on a branch. They say it is ND17! I sure hope so. It was great to see the three yesterday for the simple reason that 17 is eating somewhere…and flying around watching and learning from the parents …or there would not have been three. So very grateful. Thank you!

Carol Mandis-Beatle posted some images of the three ND eaglets on FB. I hope she does not mind if I share one of them. They were so cute..and they grow so fast!

Speaking of ‘baby pictures’. How many of you remember J3? He falls right up there with L4 for me — cutie pies – Big Red and Arthur’s kids at Cornell. Gosh, I would love to know the dispersal area of their eyases and would especially like to know how they are. You get attached and poof – gone.

J2 and J3 (J1 will be killed flying into the glass at the Weil Building) were best mates. They soared in the sky protecting their sister J1 when she was bathing in a puddle. They also soared together until one morning…J3 got into a thermal, soared high and was gone- out of sight forever. Then J2.

The pressure on BC Hydro to do something to help the Bald Eagles continues – and I am so glad that it is not losing traction. Two articles – one in the Times Colonist and the other in the Vancouver Sun.

https://www.timescolonist.com/local-news/eaglet-from-blended-raptor-family-dies-from-electrocution-5618079?fbclid=IwAR1rliqQwaRn6rVhdPyYF0mpEMqg8fRzL5Dr0K1PNQpqYbmmqzIOCbsiyQk

Malala has been coming and going from the nest. To check out her images please go to GROWLS FB page. You do not have to be a member of FB or their group to see the images.

‘H’ caught the trio at the Boathouse ‘Waddling’ this morning and made a YouTube clip. It is short and ever so cute…all are standing. Thank you ‘H’. That nest is getting rather small…

https://youtube.com/clip/UgkxtoqfzEvKNx_o0JQzGRwo4EMvhHpGn5WQ

In Poole Harbour, there was a moment when the nest was empty. Both chicks of CJ7 and Blue 022 have fledged!!!!!!!! 5H2 fledged this morning. Celebration Time. Like all others, they will, of course, chase the parents back and forth for food for a bit building up their flying skills. Hopefully we will have a few more weeks with the family before CJ7 heads south for her winter break.

5H2 has returned to claim a fish on the nest. What a lovely sight she is. Always good to see them return the first few times! Congratulations to everyone at Poole Harbour.

Skipping way across the pond, the sun made the nest golden at Osoyoos this morning. The chicks were beautiful! Olsen brought in a small fish at 07:16, the first of the day unless I missed something quite a bit earlier.

Alden has found a new loafing spot. He may have to change often if those two fledglings – and Grinnell, Jr in particular – continue to find him. It seems that all the nooks and corners of the Campanile at Berkeley are being visited by Lindsay and Grinnell Jr looking for Mum or Dad or both! Not much peace and quiet…it is beautiful, isn’t it?

Can you spot Alden?

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. It is hazy here this morning The garden birds have been awake for ever so long. The Crows have been at the bird bath cawing their heads off for more peanuts. They was them…and leave the shells in the water for their human servants to clean up! It is so funny to watch. I will try and catch some images for you today. Take care everyone. I hope that your start to the week is a good one. Hoping that we get another update on Victor’s progress soon!!!!

Thank you to the following for their FB posts, videos, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Cal Falcons, Osoyoos Ospreys, Poole Harbour Ospreys, GROWLS, Cornell Bird Lab RTH Cam, ND-LEEF, Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender, Mlade Buky, Finnish Osprey Foundation, and Sydney Sea-eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Sydney Olympic Park.

Little Bit with sibs in the forest and other brief news in Bird World

24 July 2022

What promised to be a lovely day at the nature centre doing the 4.5 km walk and checking on some little Coots turned out to be a run flat tire shredded by the time I got to a place where I could get a new one! Can you hear me growling??? As I waited for my new tire, I noticed something and it made me mad. In Winnipeg, glue traps were outlawed as of 1 July 2022. So why am I seeing stacks of these horrible killers on the shelves??? Letters have already gone out to the company and to several municipal offices. The products should be removed and destroyed responsibly. This is a plea by a raptor group that shows what glue traps do to birds – and other animals that get on them. It is horrible. Please do not use these.

The public attitude towards wildlife – including our fearless raptors – has changed over the decades. Perhaps it has not been as fast as some of us would want but, there is a growing awareness that we live in a world that is ‘connected’. The balance that we need to exist means that all living things have rights and are to be respected. It is no longer acceptable to shoot raptors and it is definitely no longer acceptable, as it was in the 1950s and mid-1960s, to shoot Bald Eagles for the $2 bounty. Cut their legs off, tie them up, you get $2! That would outrage us if we saw buckets of our beloved eagle’s legs on a dock! It is also no longer acceptable to tear down nests to build parking lots for stores. The more we learn and study and watch our beautiful feathered friends the more we understand that they are not so different as us as families. What is different is that their lives have been compromised by humans. In 2022, we know that we need to fix that but…we need everyone to understand and care for wildlife, to demand that utility companies and businesses who make huge profits undertake to be responsible stewards of our planet. That is why I am always happy to see a news story about the birds!

It is always good when stories about our beloved raptors make it into the news. California really is the gold star for keeping wildlife and their stories in the public.

One of the most loved nests is that of Louis – Lonesome Louis he was called before Aila came to Loch Arkaig. Now he is with Dorcha for their second year and the two surviving osplets were named by their fans – Willow and Sarafina. That made the news!

Continuing on with birds in the news and birds in the news who are making history is the story of the first fledge out of Dorset and Poole Harbour in over 200 years! Once again our hats are taken off in great respect to the team that worked on this translocation project. It worked thanks to CJ7 waiting for a mate and Blue 022 falling in love with her and returning this year to start a family!

To put a smile on everyone’s face, Kennth Kujawski filmed the 3 juveniles at the Notre-Dame nest. Here it is and it feels wonderful to see them all! Little Bit 17 is identified first – but all three are there. ND17 must be eating — and that puts tears on my cheeks.

There have been three fish deliveries so far to the Osoyoos Osprey nest today in British Columbia. Soo is trying to keep the babies cool.

Lady and SE29 and 30 are just waking up in the forest of the Sydney Olympic Park. Dad has lots of fish on the nest and the two are just cute little fluffy snow people with wings!

I am continually checking on the two osplets in Finland at the Janakkalan Nest. They are either sleeping or eating – good things to do as they prepare to fledge and fatten up for migration. Dad is doing a great job. I have not caught the intruder on the nest, have you?

These two look great!

Ever want a list of the names and images of all the eaglets at the nests in the Channel Islands but were afraid to ask? Here you go.

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/chil_eaglecam/meet-the-class-of-2022-t13084.html?fbclid=IwAR2a6B-K1vNfkgcu51Bu10nJYonvMwP0pdppzoiMFAPu2BdSoT6ox51e5cQ

Last but never least, Annie and Alden whose scrape is in UC-Berkeley’s Campanile, finally got some quiet time to bond in the scrape!

Continue to send warm wishes to the Osoyoos Nest. We want Soo to have so much fish that she cannot believe her eyes! OK. Maybe I am not being realistic. How about one large headless fish?

I will write more about BC Hydro but if you want to send a letter about how outraged you are that they do not take their responsibilities to the wildlife seriously, you can e-mail them at: connectwithus@bchydro.com

Chris O’Riley is the CEO! What we want is an immediate start to using poles with a clearance of a little more than 7′ on all new poles between the wires. They can retrofit the existing poles. They are a public company that needs to be mindful of their powerful and thus responsible position as a public utility funded by the taxpayers ——-who demand that they take seriously their role and protect wildlife that are injured by their poles.

Thank you for joining me today. All the nests seem fine as do the Crows, the Blue Jays, Dyson, and the rabbits in the garden right now. It is the flurry of eating before bedtime for all of them. Take care of yourself. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their FB posts and their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: The Raptor Trust, Osoyoos Ospreys, Finnish Osprey Foundation, Channel Islands Eagle Lovers, Cal Falcons, and Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Sydney Olympic Park.

Late Saturday in Bird World

23 July 2022

Oh, it turned out to be a cracker of a day in Winnipeg. Everyone woke to a forecast of rain and then the skies cleared. The paths at the nature centre were packed with smiling faces and everyone saying ‘hello’ or talking about the teenage goslings. It was fantastic.

Sleepy babies.

Teenagers – long necks and legs. Paying close attention to the adult’s instructions!

One lone America White Pelican in the middle of the lake — image cropped a great deal!

It continues to be quiet in Bird World. Seriously this is such a good thing.

Good news has come from the Pitkin County Open Space and Trails Ospreys. You will remember that the two gorgeous and almost fully feathered osplets on the nest were pulled off when Mum got her talon caught in monofilament line and nesting material. One died when it hit the ground but the other was saved by a passerby who knew what to do – and got immediate help! That chick was in very guarded condition at the time. This is today’s update and it is a little better.

5H1 made history today as the first fledgling Osprey in Poole Harbour, UK,, for 200 years. CJ7 and Blue 022’s chick really does love to fly. Here is a video of her landing on a subsequent flight….gosh, she is pretty steady on those legs.

The names of Louis and Dorcha’s two surviving osplets for the 2022 season have been released by the Woodland Trust. There were 2674 votes cast. The winning names are Willow for LW5 with 22.7% and Sarafina for LW6 with 20.5%. That was an amazing voting turnout. Thank you to everyone that took part.

That is Willow standing up. My goodness she is going to be dark like Dorcha. Stunning plumage.

Olsen had delivered several twiddler size fish and one nice one by 10:48 at the Osoyoos Osprey platform. He brought in another fish at 12:49. Thanks Olsen! Olsen appears to have a wee crop so he is eating. Remember it is like the directions for the oxygen masks in planes – put yours own and then help your child. Olsen and Soo have to eat in order to care for the chicks and keep their health up as good as they can in the circumstances of extreme heat. Soo immediately started feeding the two chicks. The rest of the day she has kept them covered when the sun was at its hottest.

Just a quick check on a couple of other nests. The juveniles have not been seen at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta but, there was a fly by this morning in the distance. Those nests sure do get lonely if you have been watching intently for months and then — everyone fledges, returns to the nest for prey drops after flying, and then…poof. Gone. Turn that love into making their world better! So instead of wondering if they survived, we can say with certainty that we have made improvements and a greater percentage lives to see their first birthday.

At the Two Harbours nest, you could hear Lancer squeeeeing at 14:47 as she flew onto the nest. She was so right. The adult flew in with a fish and got out of there really quick without getting its talons trapped. So nice to see you, Lancer.

I have been following the social media posts about the electrocution of Junior on Gabriola Island just off the coast of Vancouver Island in my country, Canada. The world watched the graciousness and the love that flourished on the Bald Eagle nest and their adoption of Malala, the Red-tail Hawk as a member of their family not as lunch. It touched the hearts of hundreds of thousands of people around the world.

The tragic death of Junior, the fledgling eaglet, Malala’s friend and nest companion, shattered us.

I have noticed that some FB groups are no longer going to post any news about Junior. Of course, that is their choice but, please understand that this issue is not small and isolated. British Columbia has the largest population of Bald Eagles in the world. We are not talking about just ‘fixing’ one pole on Gabriola Island, what we want is an undertaking by BC Hydro to amend the way they construct the hydro poles immediately so that the space between the wires is wider than 7′, the length of a Bald Eagle’s wing. No bird would ever die again.

Make BC Hydro live up to what they say – words mean nothing without action behind them.

Of course, retrofitting those on Gabriola Island is paramount. More about this tomorrow but, please don’t let the story of Junior and Malala pass when something else comes in the news. We have a chance to make progress and — let’s do it. Do not let this opportunity slip through our fingers.

I am trying to find out the time of Christian Sasse’s talk on the electrocution of birds. It is possible that it will be on Wednesday afternoon at 1300 or 1330 Pacific time but, I am not certain. If we want to help the eagles we need to arm ourselves with an understanding of the problem and the solution! Thank you, Christian, for educating us!

Here is the contact information for BC Hydro:

Images on the Notre-Dame FB page show 3 juveniles flying around the nest and landing on a tree near to the nest tree. It has been really stormy there and some branches have broken. It is shocking that anything is left of that old Eagle nest!

Thank you so very much for being with us today. Please take care of yourself. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their FB postings and streaming cameras where I took my screen captures: Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, Bald Eagles 101, Poole Harbour Ospreys, Friends of Loch Arkaig and the Woodland Trust, Osoyoos Ospreys, Explore.org and IWS, GROWLS, and ND-LEEF.

Saturday Morning in Bird World

23 July 2022

Oh, good morning everyone. I hope that your Saturday is starting off nicely. It is a day that my mother would call ‘sultry’ – high humidity and it feels like it could rain. The sky is a light grey with whisps of blue. Already the small songbirds are in the bird bath – enjoying the deck while the Crows are away! The three juveniles seem to have claimed two houses – ours and the one next – as ‘their’ territory. I continue to be fascinated by the fact that they are large in size but are just ‘babies’ learning to not stand on the hot metal and what is food and what isn’t. Of course, our dear Little Bit 17 is – I so hope – learning the same way. The juvenile Blue Jays are also here collecting peanuts under the watchful eye of Junior and Mrs Junior. They are now mantling their peanuts and beginning to learn ‘competition’ in an interesting way directed by Junior. That is, of course, another thing that happens after fledging. We saw it clearly at Port Lincoln Osprey barge last year. The three lads were as good as gold in the nest. Everyone marvelled and wondered why? Well, it was three males. But, oh, once they fledged- after a couple of weeks passed – and the competition for prey items intensified. I learned what the Australian term ‘dust up’ meant – a nicer term for a big brawl. Do you remember? This is Ervie and Bazza having one of their battles.

The little Merlin taken into out wildlife rehab centre and who had a successful surgery has made the news. It is a big thing -our wildlife centre doesn’t always make the news with its patients. Hopefully people will spread the word about ‘not’ shooting the raptors (or other birds and waterfowl).

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/merlin-pellet-surgrical-removal-1.6529811?fbclid=IwAR136exwIos-dkNBrk_TnmX3cDMlC7hnRnfNgy0Y5Swt0PZg8XKboL_utKM

It is thankfully pretty quiet in Bird World today. Big Red and Arthur watch over L2 and L4 from the light stands – a rare moment caught on the streaming cam as it surveyed the area around the nest.

Big Red is on the left and Arthur is on the right

The first of the historic osplets to hatch at Poole Harbour has fledged. 5H1 took to the skies this morning. It happened at 11:54. 5H1 flew for 15 minutes before landing perfectly next to Dad, Blue 022, on the nest rim.

The oldest chick, 5H1, is on the perch to the right. You can barely make out a feather of her tail.

She lands! H51 has been on and off the nest ever since having a good old time being a bird! Oh, do you ever wish you could fly?

The story of Junior’s tragic death is hitting other newspapers. https://www.cheknews.ca/gabriola-island-eagle-that-shared-nest-with-hawk-found-electrocuted-1064590/

The story of the nest and the untimely killing of Junior needs to be kept alive. The e-mails to BC Hydro need to flood their inbox in order for this human caused tragedy to be fixed so that it does not happen again. It is the only way that change will happen.

Christian Sasse will be giving a special YouTube talk – in his capacity as an electric engineer -on avian electrocutions. He does not mention the time. If you go to YouTube and search for Christian Sasse you can subscribe to his channel. In theory, you should get a notification of the talk. This does not always work but Christian archives the discussions also and that is much appreciated. We should all educate ourselves on these dangers so that you speak and write to authorities with knowledge and facts.

The news of the rescue of the osplet from the Delaware River in Pennsylvania has been all over the social media platforms. It is one of those great stories. The PA Game Commission got a call of a juvenile osprey in trouble. It had fallen into the water. They immediately act to save its life! The ranger found it sitting on a wall and returned the chick to its nest That is a story that each of us would welcome every day — action! Thank you!

There have been several twiddler deliveries to the Osoyoos nest this morning (it is now 0900 there). Twiddlers at 05:53, 06:11, and 07:44. Two fish of reasonable size landed at 07:40 and 08:09. That is a good start to the day. The high will be 33 C. Hot.

I am always amazed at how quickly the little black beaks of the White-bellied sea eagles grow. The two chicks are doing fine. Dad continues to have lots of fish on the nest and both are eating well! You can certainly tell by the fish juice that has rained down on their little heads!

Lady checks on them just as the IR camera comes on.

Plenty of fish – big fish -continue to come on the Jannakkala Osprey nest in Finland. No sign of the intruder wanna-bee Mum that was around the nest a couple of days ago. Dad must be grateful – he doesn’t have to supply fish for her anymore, just his kids. I have not heard if the Mum’s body was found. I will check for us.

I did not find any more information but I could be looking in the wrong place. I will continue to search out any news. What I did find was a very informative paragraph about the banding and nests of the birds in Finland. I was particularly drawn to the fact that platforms were placed in good environments for the Ospreys. Indeed, the available fish for this nest is remarkable.

You will recall that the Balgravies Osprey nest – a natural one – collapsed with a chick. That chick was saved and placed onto an artificial platform. This is the latest ‘great’ news:

Things are quiet and that is a great way to start the weekend. Victor is working hard and standing on his own. Don’t forget to send him all your positive wishes. If you are able, a $5 donation helps – small amounts grow into big ones. That is the Ojai Raptor Centre. They also have some amazing tote bags and t-shirts which sadly do not ship to Canada! (I am going to write and ask them about this). Lots of people are watching the Notre Dame nest for any sign of Little Bit 17. Send him all your love — we want so much for this worthy eaglet to survive. The only nest needing our love is Osoyoos – we need this heat spell to break for Olsen, Soo and the kids.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their FB posts, Twitter feeds, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Port Lincoln Osprey Project, Cornell Bird Lab, Poole Harbour Ospreys, GROWLS, PA Game Commission, Osoyoos Ospreys, Sea Eagles @Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre Sydney Olympic Park, James Silvie, and the Finnish Osprey Foundation.

Early Monday in Bird World

4 July 2022

Good Morning Everyone. I hope that you had a marvellous weekend and for those celebrating independence day in many countries around the world, have a fun and safe time.

With all the talk about storks, ‘L’ asked a question in the comments. Did I know what happened to the White Stork couple, Malena and Klepetan? Thank you ‘L’ – that is a great question and I bet many are wondering too.

Klepetan and Malena are the best romance story in all of Bird World. The intervention to save Malena’s life after she was shot by a man in Croatia is a testament to what love can move us to do for our wildlife friends.

If you do not know the story, before you read further, please watch at least the first one of these videos so you know the background to this truly remarkable story.

Perhaps the most famous stork couple in the world were Klepetan and Malena. Malena stayed year round with Stjepan Vokic in Croatia. As you will know from the video, Malena was shot and it was only through the gentle care of Vokic that her life was spared. What devotion to keep her, clean her, feed her, prepare the nest and fish for both adults and chicks so that Klepatan and Malena could spend all their time together.

For 20 years, Klepetan migrated back and forth from South Africa to Brodski Varos, Croatia. Malena died peacefully on 7 July 2021 of old age. She was 28 years old. Klepetan was by her side when she died along with her other faithful companion, Vokic. Malena was buried in one of her favourite places. Klepetan continued to come every day wondering where his mate was. They had been together for 20 years and had raised 66 storklets. Klepetan was fitted with a transmitter. He did not return to the nest he shared with Melana in 2022. Did he also die? or find a different nest with a new mate? I am hoping to be able to find the time and help to see if Klepatan’s transmitter is still working.

Want to help out Humane Wildlife Indiana? They have an extensive wish list on Amazon including a xylophone for chickens. I have learned through one of our readers, ‘L’ how important it is to have creative stimulation or enrichment for all of the animals in care. Who would want to live strapped to a perch with nothing to do? There are lots of things on the list from a few dollars to $30 or $40. Here is the link. It is good to see what the wildlife clinics are asking for. You can always help out your local clinic too – they always need laundry detergent, bleach, hand sanitizer, wipes, and those old clean towels I keep repeating…Even if you do not intend purchasing anything for the clinic, have a look. It is possible that you intend to get rid of items that could be used at your local clinic.

Here is the link.

https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/12TH5G1M7K4DC?fbclid=IwAR26cBDgVhsmN3_U_rzTCKHLaamk0zys4DS3eN8P0piyppMkdBox9oJs1Ms

So busy with Little Bit and the JJ storklets that some others get forgotten so I am also playing catch up this morning. The only surviving eaglet at the Fort St Vrain nest in Colorado, 46, fledged on the 1st of July. Congratulations everyone!

It is not just Annie and Alden bonding in the scrape! As breeding season in Australia gets closer, Diamond and Xavier are doing a lot of bonding rituals in the scrape – some short, some long. Oh, you are going to fall in love with little Xavier if you don’t know him already. Here is that video clip.

‘B’ sent me a newspaper article on the rescue of the US Steel Eaglet. It is a good read with one troubling bit – they state that he eaglet will learn to fly and be released in an area away from the natal nest. My concern is that they must teach that eaglet to hunt – just like Little Bit needs that training. In order to do that the eagles need a little of time, trained professionals, and specialized structures. It is expensive and time consuming and well worth it if neither wind up back in care. Thanks ‘B’.

https://www.post-gazette.com/life/outdoors/2022/07/03/bald-eagle-pittsburgh-pennsylvania-us-steel/stories/202207030127

I want to include a screen capture that ‘H’ sent me on Sunday. It is just a beautiful sunrise at the Boathouse Osprey nest on Hog Island, Maine. How stunning. Thanks ‘H’ for sharing this beautiful image with all of us!

The boathouse osprey cam on Hog Island is currently offline and is only showing highlights.

Two chicks on the Osoyoos Osprey nest on a misty wet morning. Let’s hope that dad gets a pile of fish on the nest today since the weekend festivities have passed.

There is a severe thunderstorm watch in the area of the Canmore Fortis Exshaw Osprey nest…send positive wishes to all!

There was also beautiful sunrise in Mlade Buky, The Czech Republic. Betty has flown in and is feeding those four great big storklings.

It is early morning in the Karula National Forest in Estonia. The four chicks of Karl II and Kaia are sound asleep. It is so good that Bonus, one of JJ’s chicks, has integrated so well into this family. It is Day 5 for Bonus.

‘T’ sent me an image of Karl II. Last year he discovered the fish basket that Urmas provided. It is about 9-10km from the nest and this year Karl II has been visiting the fish basket and bringing lots of fish to the four storklets on the nest. They are hoping that the herons do not find the basket as it will limit the fish Karl II will find.

This is the other nest where Janus, the middle chick of Jan and Janika, in Urmas and Dr Madis V’s experiment has been placed. It is doing well. Thank you ‘T’.

Takoda decided to come and visit the National Arboretum nest on Sunday. He has found his reflection in the camera. There are some great ‘selfies’ that Takoda is taking! Have a peek.

Some of you became very interested in what your country is doing to help stop avian electrocutions. Knowing what is being undertaken to help the birds is a good way to begin understanding what you can do to spread the word about the dangers and solutions. ‘A’ wanted to find out what Japan was doing and she discovered that there is a special institute working on this problem on the northern most island of Japan, Hokkaido.

“Birds of prey have the habit of perching on high places with a good view and will use tall trees as well as man-made structures such as streetlights and utility poles as perches. When raptors perch on utility poles or pylons, or when they are about to take off from a perch, they are electrocuted when their wings or other body parts come in contact with parts of the body that conduct electricity.

In Hokkaido, accidents involving electrocution of Blakiston’s fish owls, hawk eagles, white-tailed eagles, and Steller’s sea eagles have occurred to date. Electrocuted birds of prey may show severe burns and blackened feathers. Red spots called electric current spots may also be seen on the skin where the electric current was applied.

To prevent electric shock accidents, electric power companies install insulators on current-carrying parts and devices to prevent birds of prey from perching on utility poles. They also install safe perches on top of utility poles to prevent electrocution. The Institute for Birds of Prey Medicine is working to prevent electric shock accidents by analyzing electric shock accidents and consulting with electric power companies and other parties in order to develop more effective countermeasures in areas where electric shock accidents have occurred or are likely to occur.”

Thank you, ‘A’.

I wanted to see what work the Institute for Birds of Prey Medicine is doing and came across something very interesting. Fifteen years ago the use of lead (Pb) ammunition was outlawed in Japan. Today, lead poisoning remains a serious problem for raptors who accidentally consume lead pellets from illegal hunting in various places in Japan but the overall testing of raptors and discovery of those who have ingested lead has dropped significantly (lower than 25%). In comparison, the US Geological Survey discovered that between 2010-2018 (the end of the study) more than 50% of all raptors in the US had been poisoned by lead either in hunting or fishing equipment. The soft lead bullets that break into fragments have the worst impact on the raptors. Other lead fishing equipment can be mistaken by birds such as Loons who think these lead weighs are pebbles and eat them!

There is no nationwide ban in the US for the use of lead. California is the only state to ban the use of lead entirely. New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Maine have partial bans in fishing gear. In 1987, Minnesota banned the use of lead shot for waterfowl hunting. In 1991, a federal law in the US also banned lead shot for waterfowl hunting. The problem rests with the DNR who has lobbied against imposing any other lead restrictions on hunters. In April of 2021, three states – Maine, Minnesota, and New York introduced bills that would ban lead completely in all hunting and fishing gear. I am checking to see if HF2556 has been signed into law in Minnesota in 2022.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/02/220217141324.htm

Do you remember the ‘Old Warrior’? He was taken into care after being found on the side of the road lethargic. He went to A Place Called Hope, another great wildlife rehabber. His lead levels were measured at 49. Very extensive lead removal treatments resulted in the old eagle with the broken leg and beak being able to go into an outside enclosure. A Place Called Hope applied to the USFWS for a license to keep the Old Warrior as an educational bird. I reached out to A Place Called Hope and they said that sadly the lead issues had caused so much damage that the Old Warrior had died. He was a poster child of trying to beat the odds. There are other kinds of ammunition – stainless steel and copper. Lead is not the answer!

There has been some concern about Blue 022 at the Poole Harbour nest. He has now been caught on camera and all is well. The two chicks have been ringed and they are both girls! Well done Poole Harbour. Congratulations and relief.

At the Rutland Mantou Bay nest of Maya and Blue 33, 1H2 and 1H3 fledged this morning. All girls are flying about and there is definitely an empty nest! They will return to harass dad for fish, no worries.

Whew! You might need an extra cup of tea or coffee to make it through this today – sorry! Lots happening in Bird World. The kids up at Loch of the Lowes are starting to get the hover going, too. Thank you for joining me today. Please take care. Thanks to everyone who sent news, photos, or comments. They are always appreciated. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages or videos where I took my screen captures: The Dodo, HRT, Ft St Vrain and Excel Energy, Falcon Cam, Audubon Explore.org, Osoyoos Osprey Cam, Fortis Exshaw, Mlade Buky, Eagle Club of Estonia, NADC-AEF, A Place Called Hope (APCH), Poole Harbour Ospreys, and LRWT.