Falcons and Football…and more in Bird World for Tuesday

22 November 2022

Good Morning to Everyone!

It has warmed up on the Canadian Prairies – and because of that the heating is not on as much and it is damp and cold. Believe me, we always grumble about the weather. It is to be 0 degrees C today! It will cause things to melt a bit and get all slushy – there is nothing worse than chills to the bone. It will be a good day to go to the pond and see if there are any of those Wood Ducks still hanging about. Images (sadly I do not have permission to share them – yet) have been coming in that are showing 50 or 60 Bald Eagles just south of our City in the trees alongside the Snowy Owls. It is quite incredible.

In the Mail:

There are times when we just need something to put a smile on our face. When I lived in Norman Oklahoma and went to the University of Oklahoma, it was impossible not to be an OU Sooners Football Fan. I can still smell the damp leaves in the fall covering the sidewalks on the way to the stadium. When ‘B’ found out about this, he sent me the most fabulous image. As we all remember – too well – there was a time in 2020 and 2021 when large gatherings of people were forbidden due to Covid. One of those was, of course, the popular football games in the US. So, the University of California at Berkeley, put up cardboard cut outs of viewers. Guess who got the prime seat? Look!

That is fabulous. Our own Grinnell. Alden is wonderful but there was just something about Grinnell that made him ever so special. It is hard to lose them.

Thank you ‘B’.

The other day Annie and Alden attended all the celebrations for the latest football game at Berkeley when the Cal Golden Bears beat the Stanford Cardinals 27-20. Our adorable Peregrine Falcon couple went up to the ledge, spent some time there recuperating (was it 3 hours?). ‘H’ sent me a link to the video of them sitting and leaving together that she made for us to enjoy. Thank you ‘H’.

Making News:

There is news coming in about the streaming cams and nests on Captiva Island -the Bald Eagle nest of Connie and Clive and the Osprey nest of Andy and Lena.

The Dfyi Osprey Project in Wales is reporting that there are two beautiful Red Kites on the Dyfi Osprey nest of Idris and Telyn. Aren’t they ever so beautiful? Just look at that plumage. I don’t know about you but I am simply mystified at how beautiful these raptors are – the falcons, the kites, the kestrels, the Merlins, and the Harriers. You can take the same colours and shake them up and each one is slightly different than the other. I have to admit that the Red Kites are quite stunning with those icy blue heads and amber eyes, bright chrome-yellow cere and short hooked beaks with its black tip. The terracotta or rusty sort of Corten Steel colour of the tails (reminiscent of the Red-tail Hawk) set against the dark chocolate trimmed with white is outstanding.

You can check on all the birds that use this nest by going to dyfiospreyproject.com

There is no rest for Dr Peter Sharpe of the Institute for Wildlife Studies. Those who watched the Channel Island’s Bald Eagle nests will remember Dr Sharpe climbing up to rescue Lancer at Two Harbours, getting a chick of the cliff at the West End, and going in and taking Victor to the Ojai Raptor Centre last season. He is now busy working on the cameras. Here is the announcement from the IWS.

Everyone is getting ready for the Bald Eagle breeding season. Speaking of that, Samson and Gabby were caught mating on the nest today just like Harriet and M15 were a week or so ago. Eggs should be coming shortly. Will there be holiday eaglets?

Philippe Josse reports that progress is certainly being made on the Notre Dame Eagles nest – the natal nest of dearest Little Bit ND17. Please join the FB group Notre Dame Eagles for up to date information on this family.

Terry Carman is keeping track of the Bald Eagle eggs on the streaming cam. Here is the latest report — and all bets are on Harriet and M15 having their first egg today at SWFlorida! If you are looking to track Bald Eagle laying, please head over to this great FB group. There you will always have the latest information.

Checking on the Australian Nests:

Zoe is 66 days old today. She could fledge at any time. She is doing some good hovering and has nailed stealing the fish when Dad brings it to the nest! And you know what? She is gorgeous. When the wind whips her crest up it accents those focused piercing eyes and that very sharp hooked black beak. The dark black eye line just makes her that more gorgeous.

The winds are at 26 kph right now. Gusty for our girl. I hope she does not get swept up when she is practising her hovering. Zoe is getting better each day at that hover but, still. We saw what wind gusts can do with Rufus. I prefer that they take off on their own!

In Orange, Xavier and Diamond seem to be having prey drops with Indigo. She is really doing well!

Look carefully over at the trees!

Yesterday Shines found Rubus on the ground next to the road and put the little fella back up in the Waddle Tree.

I have to admit that I am a wee bit worried about Rubus and that is only because there have been no reports of any feedings. That is not to say they have no occurred. Diamond and Xavier are cracker parents and I think they are decidedly trying to lure Rubus back up to the scrape. It is possible that he does not feel confident to fly. Has anyone seen Rubus flying since he fledged/fledged?

Some more photos of Rubus higher in the Wattle Tree.

Every once in awhile one of the parents goes up to the scrape. I think they are really trying to lure Rubus back into the box.

Xavier is keeping an eye over everything happening with his two fledglings from the ledge of the box.

At 1540 Indigo comes up to the scrape box prey calling, very loudly, and Xavier immediately takes off. Indigo stays in the scrape looking for prey amongst the feathers. Will Xavier return with something from the storage vault?

Indigo spent the night in the scrape box last evening.

I urge you to check out the wonderful website that has gone up at Orange. Cilla Kinross and her great team have put together cracker content and you can get up to date information on our falcon family there with their photographs.

That link is: falcon cam.csu.edu.au

No 12 The Red List: The Merlin

Merlin Falcon” by minds-eye is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

Oh, it is hard to imagine that this lovely little raptor is on the vulnerable list in the UK. But, if it is happening there, it is possible that there are declining population numbers elsewhere. Ruth Tingay, writing in Red Sixty Seven, describes the birds as feisty and dashing with their “rapid fire kek, kek, kek, kek, kek” that demands everyone’s attention. Tingay first saw Merlins in the wilds of the Hebrides, those remote islands off the west coast of Scotland. She then saw them again in an urban setting in Idaho and said she was shocked because she always associated them with great open spaces.

Look at the colour of the plumage! They are smaller than a Peregrine Falcon measuring at most 30 cm or 12 inches in length or the Red Kits who grow to approximately twice their size. The male Merlin has dark steel blue grey upper wings, tail and top of the head. The underwing – the primaries and the secondaries are the same dark grey barred with a lighter grey. There is a fine white eye line, magnificent rusty-orange with dark chocolate barring on the underneath, on the legs and the upper part of the wing. The deepest dark 70% cocoa eyes, a white beard and throat. The beak has a black tip fading into that grey blue and a yellow cere. The legs are chrome-yellow with deep black talons.

Merlins are described as “our smallest falcon, male smaller than the female, not much bigger than a Blackbird.” They live on the moors and open fields where they breed but travel to the south and the coasts of the UK for their wintering grounds. Here is their map.

Seriously adorable but, in the sky and hunting, they are formidable for the smaller birds.

Falcon” by Terry Kearney is marked with CC0 1.0.

The Merlin was a popular hawk of Mary Queen of Scots and became known as the Queen’s Falcon or Lady’s Hawks. Royalty and women of the aristocracy would use them to hunt Sky Larks. They are a fierce hunter capturing their prey from the air, high up meaning that they have to have a very calculated effort. They normally hunt small to medium sized birds bit have been known to take pigeons, ducks, and even plover.

Sadly, they are quickly losing their habitat, pesticides and secondary poisoning, and of course the shooting by the keepers of the estates where Red Grouse hunting takes place. Other causes of death are collision and cat predation. There are many other threats. Corvids, such as Crows and Jays, will eat the eggs and the nestlings if they find them and, indeed, Merlins do not build their own nest but reuse the nests of others including Crows. Larger Raptors such as Peregrine Falcons, Great Horned Owls, and even Goshawks are a threat but all others tend to steer clear of this small falcon because of its aggressiveness.

Climate change will impact this small spirited hawk. Audubon has set up a programme to try and predict the changes to its breeding habitat. As you can see they will be pushed further north to where it is cooler. With the polar ice melting and the seas warming, I wonder how long it will be cooler in the north?

Some new books have arrived and I will be anxious to tell you about them as I work my way through. For now I am trying to scout out all the birding sites on the island of Grenada in the West Indies so that I can – hopefully – send you some images of birds that are either old friends or new ones. My son will probably never invite me again! He gets another location or two each day – . I was told tonight to bring my gum boots and lots of mosquito repellent. So for dear ‘L’ who was worried that the newsletter might stop while I am away, ‘no’ it will not. You are all going on my birding adventure with me!

Thank you so much for being here today. It is so nice to have you with us. Please take care of yourself – and I will see you soon!

Thank you to the following for their letters, their posts, their videos, and their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: ‘B’ so grateful for that image of Grinnell, ‘H’ for her great videos, Captiva Island Eagles and Ospreys FB, Dyfi Osprey Project FB, IWS, Notre Dame Eagles, Bald Eagles Live Nest Cams and News, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Charles Sturt Falcon Cam and Cilla Kinross, the Falcon Cam Blog, Open Verse, and Audubon.org.

Thursday in Bird World

21 July 2023

Oh, it feels like another scorcher. Clear beautiful blue skies, not a cloud in sight, no rain, and 27 degrees C. It is a cooker. There are no birds flitting about – they are all being still in the shade.

I want to thank ‘B’ for alerting me to Little Bit’s release. I failed to do so in that posting and I am very grateful. Thank you ‘B’.

There is hardly anything left of the old Notre Dame nest in the park. It is going to be 33 in the area today. Let us all hope that Little Bit 17 – who was released back into the area yesterday – finds his family and is learning how to locate prey and eating well. Anything short of that would just be tragic.

Everyone at our local wildlife rehabilitation Centre was thrilled when a Bald Eagle that came into care was ready to be released today. This was an adult eagle and did not need to be taught to hunt prey but they did have to master the Flyway!

There he goes! Congratulations.

Sadly, a Merlin came into care after being shot in its shoulder yesterday. The vet at Wildlife Haven and the team worked tirelessly to try and give that little raptor a second chance.

I received word this morning that the Merlin is doing very well and the surgery to save its life was a success. It will now begin the long process of recovery thanks to all the volunteers, the donors who immediately chipped in for the costs of the antibiotics, etc. that will help this raptor recover. The wildlife rehabbers, vets, students, and volunteers as well as donors continue to be real ‘angels’ for all the injured birds. They do amazing things each and every day out of love – not our of any financial gain – because there isn’t any! I had a chat with one wildlife rehabilitation officer and she said that if everyone would take the funds they would spend for one coffee or one treat and put it in a jar and at the end of the month donate that money – every clinic would be able to do wonders towards helping centres across North America be able to help all the patients that come into their care even better.

Just when we thought that Avian Flu was waning, news from the UK and now from the province of Newfoundland in Canada says otherwise. Seabirds are dying by the thousands in eastern Canada. No doubt we will see a rise elsewhere. So very, very tragic.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/nl-seabirds-dying-avian-flu-1.6525180?fbclid=IwAR2qxyrUa7YAamJOmchw6xru2qdPes-2mJBDDAo60QQqZp8nOow2E6bq7F8

Mr Crow is training the three fledglings on what foods to eat – in our garden! We put out the makings of the sandwich and one took a leaf and dipped it in the water which got a frightful cry from Dad. They are making quite the ruckus. They are also ‘playing’ flying from chimney to chimney and back again. They look big and they are but their minds are ‘little fledglings’. Yesterday they were on top of the glass roof of the sunroom pecking away trying to get in. —–Of course my point is this. The male is actively teaching the three what to eat and where to find food!

This guy decided to dip his peanut in the bird bath. So cute.

Looking at me.

All three flew up to the neighbour’s chimney. (She puts out cat kibble for the feral cats but doesn’t realize it is the Crows that are eating it!) One stood on the metal top til its feet got hot. Mr Crow told them to stay put and they did – for about 10 minutes in the heat. I think they are now having a good old rest.

I wonder if the parents of Little Bit 17 will undertake this level of training? They have had all this time to work with ND15 and 16. Big Red and Arthur certainly spent weeks impressing on the hawklets where to catch voles and how to catch the squirrels. Oh, gosh, let us hope so and – let’s pray for good food sources for them.

At the Osoyoos Osprey nest where temperatures have been in the mid 30 degree C at ground level, Olsen has brought in one fish this morning. Mum Soo fed both chicks equally and had some herself. It is a good start to the day but it has to be difficult fishing for it is now 0936 at the nest. That first fish and feeding were 0816. It will be another extreme heat day at the nest. Keep your positive wishes going out to them.

The osplets are standing and look at the nice juvenile feathers coming in.

The fish has arrived.

Soo made sure that each got equal so no one is left out. Good for Mum. Her crop is sunken in – everyone really needs one good fish to land on this nest today along with a few small ones. Or could I wish for 2 big fish?

We are only 27 degrees C but, in the shade of the lilacs, the temperature is 18. There are dozens and dozens of small songbirds in there, sitting quiet, saving their resources and staying cool. Thinking of planting? Think of the birds. Plant native trees that will provide shade and maybe even some seeds for the birds and squirrels.

Poor Alden! Will Grinnell Jr find him hiding in the shade of the scrape?

Dad has two nice fish on the Sydney Sea Eagles nest for when Lady and SE29 and 30 wake up and want their breakfast fish.

The news out of Balgavies Ospreys is that the chick that was on the nest that collapsed, Blue 640, was placed on a new high platform and has fledged. How grand. No injuries from the nest collapsing — and immediately taken into care to see if all was alright. Parents are around. All is good.

At the Glaslyn nest of Aran and Mrs G, the last of the 2022 chicks, Blue 499, has fledged! Congratulations everyone. He flew back to the perch and slowly made his way down to the nest.

Dory keeping her three osplets cool today. It is currently 24 degrees C – not bad! Osoyoos would certainly take those cooler temperatures.

Fish continue to land on the nest at Jannakkalan Osprey nest in Finland. No shortage! Both chicks self-feeding – one continues to be better than the other but it will soon catch up. They need to get their technique down and hold the fish and pull up…it will come! The possible step-mum began to peck at the chicks again and has not been seen today. Both chicks are 46 days old today so close to fledging. A statement will be released about the Mum, Yellow ring band NTF after a search around the nest for her shortly.

Iris hasn’t been on her nest for some time. This morning at 0721 she paid a visit! Good Morning, Iris. Iris appeared to be looking around at someone or for someone while she was on the nest. She eventually goes to the perch and looks and then preens.

The one thing I did notice was that it was early in the morning. Iris normally fishes well before 0700. Why doesn’t she have a nice big crop? How is the fishing in the river lately? They are having the same heat as everyone else. 34 C for Iris today. Is she able to get fish?

Junior and Malala together on the nest. The female Bald Eagle has brought fish to the nest today and waited for her kids to show up. We know what has happened to Junior but where is Malala?

A letter has gone out to BC Hydro about the electrocution of Junior on one of their power poles. If you want to help, I urge you to write a letter in support. I could not find an e-mail contact on their site. If you stumble across it, please let me know. This is a great letter – have a read. Thank you, Anna Brooks!

I went to check on Soo and the chicks at Osyoos. She is desperate to try and shade them from the heat. She lost all of her chicks last year because of the heat wave. Send her your most positive wishes.

Thank you so much for joining me. People are working hard to try and help our raptors and all of the other species of birds and wildlife. Remember to leave water outside for them. It could save their lives. Please take care of yourselves. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their FB posts or their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: GROWLS, ND-LEEF, Audubon Explore, Osoyoos Ospreys, Finnish Osprey Foundation, Montana Ospreys, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Sydney, Bwywd Gwyllt Glaslyn, and Cal Falcons.