Oh, what a day!

21 June 2022

Within less than a week, we have seen two nest collapses – and I am thinking a third is coming at the Exshaw Osprey Nest in Alberta. The first was catastrophic with nest 2 at Patuxent River Park plummeting into the water. All three gorgeous older osplets were lost. Thankfully, the partial collapse at the ND-LEEF nest today at 15:43:25 did not cause that horrific sadness. ND15 had a forced fledge but he was ready to fly, thankfully, and landed in a neighbouring tree. ND16 went up the branch. ND17 stayed on the nest for some time looking down before officially branching. Both parents came with food – Mum with a raccoon (do they have a stash of these?) and Dad flew in with a salmon shortly after. Little Bit 17 claimed both but 16 took the fish and 17 polished off the entire raccoon. All is well. What was brilliant was the immediate response by staff to get to that nest. Hats off to Lindsay Grossman! and team. They are keeping a close watch on the nest.

Little Bit finished his racoon. He must be stuffed.

ND16 has come down to join Little Bit on the nest. Little Bit 17 flaps his wings. Maybe he will go up on the branch. His friend was ND15 – I hope he returns to the nest.

A couple of years ago when an on screen incident happened at a nest, it became readily apparent that there must be an emergency contact number under these streaming cams if there is NOT a 24/7 chat with a moderator that has that number. Things happen.

This morning the female at Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest brought in a matching decorating item for the nest. She obviously loves a particular shade of yellow and she must have read that monochromatic furnishings are in style! All kidding aside, the yellow mesh wire is dangerous for the two osplets – as well as the parents. They can get their feet caught. ‘H’ contacted the Centre with a number I provided and they know about the mesh but do not want to interfere. This, sadly, is the type of interference that is needed – it is like having fishing line in a nest. It is human caused. We need to hope that it all works out.

If you watch particular nests all the time, I urge you to find out the emergency number for the nest. USFWS offices will not help. If you cannot find a number below the information but there is a name of an organization, find their phone number. Also get out Google Maps and find the number of the nearest Wildlife Rehabber.

Last year when the chick went over the nest at Patuxent, people called the office of the park but they had closed. We left messages. We talked to Maryland’s USFWS – that is when I found out they will not necessarily do a thing. So find an alternative. Ask on line. Get clever. They don’t want all of us phoning them when a chick sneezes and this is why numbers aren’t posted. But the birds need immediate help -. Be a detective! And incidents most often happen after hours or on holidays. Seriously.

This nest should put a smile on everyone’s face. Telyn sees Idris – that fish is large enough to feed the family for a week. People in the centre saw Idris circling with it. What a guy. Great provider.

Been watching the nest but not put a guess on the chat about the gender of the three. You have a few more days. Dyfi is thrilled with the interest – it is a bit of fun. Here is the link to the nest!

Ferris Akel had a tour of the Cornell Campus this evening just to check on where the Ls were and see Big Red and Arthur. Ferris does a great job in finding the fledglings and I am terribly grateful that he is spending some of his evenings on the Cornell Campus so that we can see the babies. Here are some images for this evening’s tour. Enjoy. If you want to subscribe to Ferris’s tours, go to You Tube and search Ferris Akel’s tours and subscribe. If you have trouble, let me know.

Ferris found all of the fledglings and we got to say good night to Big Red and Arthur who are finished hunting and are going to rest for the night. Big Red was doing a lot of preening. She moults during the summer and in a week or so will be Big Blond – not Big Red! Enjoy the images.

Thank you for joining me this evening. Lots of nests did not get covered. So occupied with ND17 Little Bit. He is fine. He will get up on the branch if he needs to get off the nest. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: ND-LEEF, Dyfi Osprey Project, Mispillion Habour Osprey Cam and the DDNR, and Ferris Akel Tours.

Ivory-billed Woodpeckers, Hampshire Falcons and more in Monday Bird World News

9 May 2022

Oh, it is pouring down rain and, as such, is a great day to drink hot tea and read. A friend sent me an article from the New York Times. [ Thank you ‘WW’ for that]. I do have a subscription but, as of late, I just haven’t had the time to forage through the paper or, for that matter, read it at all, sometimes. I like Margaret Renkl’s writing style. Her book Late Migrations looks down at me from the bookcase and like her, I have stacks of books all around, some read, some waiting. Today, she has written an opinion piece on the Ivory-billed Woodpecker. It is a good – it is a hopeful read. That is something we can all use on a cold wet dreary day.

So apparently I can gift the article to you to read. I don’t know about you but good news is uplifting and I will take all of it that I can find including the discovery of a bird living in quiet isolation that was believed to be extinct. I just hope that thousands of humans don’t converge on Louisiana with their long lenses and ruin it! Seriously, it is important not to give away the locations of some nests and these would be one of those instances to stay quiet!

Did you know about the Peregrine Falcon scrape in St Mary’s Church in Hampshire in the UK? I didn’t! This nest has been here for a number of years. Listen to the discussion at the end to find out how the nesting birds were discovered.

The chicks are just slightly older -but not much – than Big Red’s. They are getting their itchy blood feathers. The scrape looks successful. Why do I say that? Look at all the ps on the walls!!!!!!!!!!

This is a great 51 minute talk about Peregrine Falcons by Ornithologist Keith Betton who is also the Country Bird Recorder for Hampshire. It is interesting.

There was a bit of a prey tease the other day at the Cromer scrape. They made a short video of it. Cute.

It is dinner time at one of Poland’s Peregrine Falcon nests – and it wasn’t a tease. Also notice – it is a nest! Just like the other one in the Polish forest, Dolina Baryczy.

It is evening – 20:21 – at the LRWT Manton Bay nest of Blue 33 (11) and Maya. We are definitely on pip watch but, if there is one, our Mum is not revealing it. Maya has been extremely restless since late last evening. Is she hearing her chicks? I feel like a very restless expectant parent!

I am not familiar with the Osprey nests in Finland but, last year, a lovely young woman wrote to me to tell me that they have ten nests. That is fantastic. This is the link to one of those. Last year the couple laid three eggs. All three hatched. The youngest died at the age of 2 days for an unknown reason according to the streaming cam information. There was not a threat from the goshawks so I want to continue to check on this nest. The location is splendid. Just look at the water with all the fish for the babies and parents.

The female is Manta and the male is Manu.

The eldest eaglet at the Pittsburgh-Hayes nest is getting closer to branching. She was up on the top of the nest rim called ‘The Baby Gate’ today. The others are just too curious and they will be up there soon!!!!!!! Just don’t go crowding one another knocking someone off!!!!!!!!!

Anyone still worried about L4 at the Red-tail Hawk nest of Big Red and Arthur? I sure hope not. There is the tiny one right up front having lunch! If he isn’t on the edge, he will climb over the others to get up to Mum’s beak. Partially this is because he eats less food but needs to eat more frequently than the older siblings. But oh, what a little cutie pie.

Oh, those wings look like soft cashmere. Wee one is tucked in under them keeping warm. Every chick has a big crop!

The weather in Scotland around Loch Arkaig has not been good. The winds have been very very gusty with rain. One of those gusts almost completely blew dear Louis’s mate, Dorcha, off the Loch Arkaig nest around 16:00 today. Unbelievable. It always frightens me when this happens. Last year and the year before, Big Red was almost blown off once with a chick holding on to her.

Dorcha recovered but gosh, golly.

Nancy is on high alert at the MN-DNR nest after a juvenile eagle stayed on the perch tree and another flew overhead. Oh, I wish they would leave her alone. She cannot go and hunt for her and E1 with these interlopers about. It is pretty clear that the success of the reintroduction of the Bald Eagles (and Ospreys) in the US has caused a lack of good territories and nests causing much of the disruption and harm we have seen lately. I would also include the Peregrine Falcon population in the California area. What is the answer? More artificial nests? the stocking of ponds for fish for the birds?

Alden may be shy of the chicks but he is keeping the pantry full for Annie and the two wee babes. Don’t they just melt your heart?

Seriously sweet.

Some much bigger birds in the Dale Hollow Eagle nest were both enjoying a nice fish today for lunch. Both of them are perching up on the nest rim and each is doing very well. Looking forward to their successful fledge!

The UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest cam is back up and running. Excellent news.

I continue to hope that there will be a new wee babe on the Manton Bay nest by the time I wake up tomorrow. All of the nests I have checked are doing fine except for the continuing intrusion at the MN-DNR nest of Nancy and E1.

Thank you for joining me today. Take care everyone!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: UFlorida-Gainesville, Ospreys, DHEC, Andover Peregrines, LRWT, Cal Falcons, MN-DNR, Woodland Trust, Cornell RTH, and Pix Cams.

Sunday News in Bird World

1 May 2022

Isn’t she gorgeous? Anyone who has followed this nest will know that this is Iris, the grand dame of Ospreys in the US.

Everyone loves Iris. Many are baffled about her relationship with Louis since her long time mate, Stanley, died. Each of us has an opinion about that relationship with Louis and many long for Iris to have another mate and raise chicks. I have always felt that she earned the right to a summer and a winter holiday.

Dr Erick Greene is one of the lead researchers at the Montana Osprey Project in Missoula, Montana. He has studied the Clarke-Fork River, the heat that is killing the trout, and the decline in the Osprey population. He knows everything there is to know about Iris and more.

Today he posted this message about Iris to help us understand what is driving the situation with her and Louis. Please read it carefully. Dr Greene points out that Louis is not the culprit – humans changing the environment are the issue. Something to think about not only in regard to Iris but also to other Osprey nests in the Pacific NW that suffered from heat last year.

Thank you Dr Greene for taking the time to inform us!

I love this image of Iris taken shortly after she returned from her migration in 2022.

In other Bird World news, Nancy brought in a very large fish to the MN-DNR nest at 11:22 and her and E1 had a good feed! This is a relief.

We continue to hope that Harry is off healing and will return to the nest. How sad for Nancy if her wonderful young mate of two years has been severely injured or killed. Nancy seems to be getting a time to rest. Maybe the intruders are gone. I hope that both her and E1 survive. I know she can handle this if there are no interruptions.

The four Ls at the nest of Big Red and Arthur are exceptional. L4’s eyes are not yet focused and it wound up beaking one of the older siblings who caused it to beak another. It is funny to watch. They do not hurt one another and everything will settle down once the little one, a week younger, gets its eyes clear and can hold its head straight. Meanwhile, Arthur continues to fill the pantry.

It is really hot on the light stand at the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest. The two remaining chicks on the nest are doing great. No problems!

The Decorah North eaglets continue to do well amidst worries in the region of Avian Flu. They are looking really good! This is great news.

All of the eaglets at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta on the Channel Islands have been named. 23 D is a male and is named Sky. 24 D is a male and is Ahote meaning ‘restless one’. 25 D is the female and she is Kana’kini. Lovely.

I found this great article that shows you what Dr Sharpe has to undergo to get out to the eagles in Catalina and do the work for them that he does – such as two rescues and banding in a period of ten days recently.

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20160602-a-man-who-saves-eagles-by-helicopter

I really hope you enjoy that article about Dr Sharpe. Want top see someone going well beyond for the eagles, Dr Sharpe is your person!

Thank you for joining me today. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams or their FB pages where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey Cam, Cornell Bird Lab RTH, MN-DNR, the Montana Ospreys FB, and the Montana Osprey Project.