Little Bit ND 17 is released!

21 July 2022

While I was out counting ducklings and goslings early this morning, something was happening in Indiana. Well, actually, it happened yesterday but was not announced until this morning — and that was a good thing. Little Bit did not need to be disturbed by well wishers as he integrates himself back into the life of the eagle family at the park. This was the announcement:

His crop was nice and full and he flew well. I am very grateful to Humane Indiana Wildlife for getting to Little Bit 17 quickly when called. As they initially said – he would have starved to death within 24 more hours. As we know, getting wildlife help immediately is of the utmost importance. The wait caused unnecessary stress on this lovely eaglet who, according to his feathers, had a life of stress.

Sadly this beautiful eaglet who worked so very hard to live got caught up in the do we intervene? when do we intervene? how long do we wait? the parents will take care of the eaglet on the ground controversy. The decision to wait as long as possible almost cost this bird its life.

In Australia, those who watched the Sydney Sea Eagles last year will know the story of WBSE27. It was a similar one to Little Bit for those who do not know. The eaglet was not taught to fly or hunt by its parents and rushed out and about by the Pied Currawong. It was found on a sidewalk emaciated. 27 went into care but was released when its flying was good. But 27 had not been taught to hunt its own food. The second time it was found on a sidewalk emaciated and being attacked by local small birds including Pied Currawong. This time Ranger Judy Harrington insisted that the bird be taken to a specific wildlife rehabber (yeah for Ranger Judy) who would keep 27 until such time as she could fly high and strong and be independent. She was in care for a long time – more than 6 months. When she was released she had a GPS transmitter and was ringed. Now we know how well she is doing — and she is doing great!

This track map is from a week or so ago but each colour is a different day for 27 – where she flew and caught her fish.

This is what I wish for Little Bit ND17 — and I know that it is what you wish for him, too. Let us all join together and wish that Little Bit is taught to eat by his parents and that he survives. If he is found emaciated again, let us hope that the park staff will call for help immediately and insist that 17 be given flight and prey training and that he be released elsewhere – in a prey rich area. No hesitation!

If you go to the Humane Indiana Wildlife FB page you will be able to see the video of Little Bit 17 being released. Please thank them for their kindness in giving Little Bit 17 a second chance. They have done what was requested by the owners of the property where the nest is located. Just send positive wishes that his life in the family grows and that he is embraced and taught how to survive by his parents – . That would be the very best. Clearly from the announcement Little Bit is flying around with them!

I will have a more complete report on the activities in the other nests later. Thank you so much for joining me for this wonderful moment in Little Bit’s life — flying free in the wild for the first time. Send all positive wishes that he will learn to hunt, he will fly high, and he will always have a crop!

Thank you to the following for the material I used in this blog: Humane Indiana Wildlife and Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Sydney Olympic Park.

Late Friday in Bird World

08 April 2022

Just when I introduce you to Teo and Vita, a new cute female shows up on the nest the minute Teo arrives with a fish! This is the only Osprey nest in Latvia but it looks like there are floaters looking for mates. Maybe another nest is in the making???

I have not seen an image Of Karl II at the nest in the Karula National Forest but, Looduskalender says that Karl II is now in Estonia and could be arriving anytime. I hope the camera gets to working!

If you have not suggested a name for Annie’s ‘New Guy’, Cal Falcons is accepting suggestions on their FB page. On Monday, they will select the finalists from that list for voting. Give the ‘New Guy’ a great name associated with UC-Berkeley. I hope he continues to be a loving, kind, and supportive mate for our Annie.

Annie in the scrape 08 April 2022. 11:47. Incubating three eggs – 2 Grinnell’s and 1 of New Guys.

Speaking of Peregrine Falcons, did I mention that the couple in Manchester, New Hampshire have five —— yes, 5 – eggs?! They were laid on March 21, 23, 25, 28, and 30th. How in the world do they fit them underneath? So grateful that the scrape box is covered! Don’t want to see anyone cold and sick. This is going to be a great nest to watch!

Here is the link to that streaming camera:

After posting that WBSE 27 was released from rehab in Sydney, Australia, ‘B’ wrote and asked if there had been any sightings of Daisy the Duck and ducklings. I checked with my source and they said no sightings of Daisy. Boy did that little duck win over our hearts. Won’t ever forget her! If I ever do hear anything, I will be sure to let you know. This is precisely why my friend there has not sent us any images. We do hope that Daisy hatched some eggs and that her and the ducklings are safe and sound.

Staying in the Sydney Olympic Forest and Discovery Centre area. My source believes that the WBSE eaglet juvenile that landed on the WBSE a few weeks ago could possibly be WBSE 27’s younger sibling, WBSE28. 28 fludged and has not been seen after being chased out of the forest by the Curra. Oh, I loved the spunk of that eaglet. Well, that would simply be wonderful if this is 28. Of course the bird looks quite skinny and hungry to me – which makes me ultra sad. I hope it gets some fish and is safe and well. Life is so difficult for the first year birds. 28 was a sweetheart. Of course, this is just conjecture and wishful thinking on the part of my source and me. We know it wasn’t 27 because she was in care and 26 was euthanized. The plumage and the attitude make my source believe that this beautiful bird is 28.

I really appreciate it when you write and ask questions, send links to nests, or news worthy articles. There are so many and it is hard to keep up. As we all know, the Bald Eagle and Osprey populations – the Apex Predators at the top of the food chain – were almost completely wiped out due to DDT use. The numbers have been climbing back up and populations are healthy but, the regular counts are starting to see a drop in the number of eagles. As you know, I want to see positive change in hunting and fishing equipment including the ban of all lead. ‘S’ sent me this great article on the impact that lead ammunition is having on population declines and I wanted to share it with you. Each person that ceases to use lead when they hunt and fish ultimately help. One person at a time can make a huge difference! Believe it.

It is unclear how long the YouTube station will be broadcasting the nest of Eastern Imperial Eagles, Altyn and Altynai. This is only the second year that the Imperial Eagle cam has been streaming.

Last year, the couple laid their eggs on 13 April and 16 April. The first eaglet, a male, named Aydar hatched on 24 May. He was found dead under a power line on 6 September after fledging. The second eaglet, a female, named Aygul, hatched on the 26th of May. She fledged on 12 August. She is ringed and her numbers are black on silver АВ-0423-2Е on the right leg and a silver and green ring В-423 on the left leg.

Eastern Imperial Eagles were persecuted for years by humans and are one of Europe’s most endangered species. There are approximately 10,000 breeding pairs left in the world. They breed in northern European forests – from Central and Eastern Europe all the way to Asia. They live all over southern Europe and southern Russia. Some winter in Africa, India, and southeastern PRC. They do not like to live around humans and are vulnerable to deaths by unprotected power lines and, of course, habitation loss. Their plumage is a dark brown with a rufous tinge on their shoulders. The head and neck are often lighter in colour often casting a golden glow. They are extremely beautiful birds. The eagles lay 1-4 eggs and live on small mammals, reptiles, snakes, and carrion (found dead animals). They are large predators measuring from 72-84 cm or 28.3-33.1 inches weighing an average of 5.5 lbs for the male or 2.65 kilos and females being larger weigh from 8.1 lbs or 4 kilos.

You can see that beautiful plumage that differentiates these eagles from others such as the Bald Eagle. Gorgeous!

Eastern Imperial Eagle” by Koshyk is marked with CC BY 2.0.

It wouldn’t be Friday without stopping in and checking on Thunder and Akecheta and the triplets. Seriously, how could you not smile every time you see this wonderful eagle family in the Channel Islands. Two years without eaglets and then triplets – no fighting, just great civilized kids and wonderful parenting!

This is a great nest. The land is owned by the US Navy. The Institute for Wildlife Studies and Explore.org have a permit to run the camera. That permit specifies when they can go and do maintenance, etc. The US Navy could, based on the agreement, stop the camera from operating. They are the controlling authority. — Do not worry. Dr Sharpe and his crew are fine. I am using this nest as an example of who ultimately has control over what happens at this nest – the landowner, the US Navy. If it were on my property, like Lori Coverts at the Captiva Osprey nest, then she has control. Lori withdrew her agreement with the AEF and gave Windows on Wildlife an opportunity to run a camera and chat. Lori called in CROW when Big died of unknown causes. — Sometimes it is good to know the hierarchy at the nests.

The other nests seem to be doing fine. Both eaglets are eating at US Steel – fantastic. Still waiting for Aran to get to the Glaslyn Osprey nest in Wales and for the camera to up and running at the Karula National Forest for Karl II and mate, Kaia.

Thank you for joining me. I hope you have a lovely evening. Take care everyone. See you soon!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams or their FB pages where I took my screen captures: The Institute of Wildlife Studies and Explore.org, Sydney Sea Eagle at Birdlife Discovery Centre Sydney Olympic Park Peregrine Falcons Live, and Cal Falcons.

Sadness on the WRDC Nest and other Bird World News

Yesterday we celebrated the arrival of R3 on the WRDC in Miami-Dade County. The third hatch of Ron and Rita did not make it and died. It would be seriously impossible to tell what caused the death. The nest cup is so deep and narrow that it might have just been suffocated. We will not know for sure. Rita removed its body from the nest cup at 11:18 this morning and placed it along the rim of the nest at 06:00. It will probably become part of the nest unless Rita or Ron remove the body completely from the nest.

R1 and R2 are healthy and growing. Let us celebrate that! As you know I had hoped that R3 would not even hatch. It is always better to have strong healthy eaglets, fewer of them, than more not so healthy.

It is also wonderful that the adults continue to work on this nest. Spanish Moss is coming in to fill up the nest cup and make everything soft while branches are going up on the side. I was a little worried about these curious Rs climbing on what appears to be chicken wire like construction. Yes, just another worried auntie!!!!

Rita looking lovingly at her two surviving chicks, R1 and R2 after R3 passed.

At the time, I actually thought that R2 might have been dying but it was only in a deep food coma. Seriously, I almost panicked. Thankfully, both chicks are fine as you can see from the time stamp above. They have been eating a green parrot and fish.

As the day progresses, the heat comes on the nest. Rita is busy helping R1 and R2 stay cool. As we know from the heat wave going through the Pacific Northwest in May and June of 2021, heat can cause bird deaths. In Canada, many jumped from their nests to avoid being ‘cooked to death’ during that heat wave. It is currently 27 degrees C in Miami with a chance or rain. These two little ones are unable to regulate their own temperatures so the parents must help them.

Here is the link to the WRDC nest:

Anna and Louis are approaching pip watch and official hatch watch (is there a difference?) tomorrow. The KNF Wildlife staff posted this notice on their FB page this morning. Steve and Cody, the Rangers who maintain the cam, appear to be super excited. So am I!

Here is the link to the KNF nest. There is one egg for Anna and Louis as the second egg was broken by accident when Anna landed one day. They fledged their first chick last year, Kisatchie. Kistachie was the first eaglet to hatch at this nest since 2013. Incredible. It is a beautiful nest close to Kincaid Lake in central Louisiana and belonged to an elderly Bald Eagle couple that quit using it in 2013. Louis and Anna arrived and then last breeding season returned to take over the nest and raise their family. Louis is an excellent fisher! No shortage of fish. Indeed, last year this pair could have started a fish exporting business to other eagle nests as they had way too much food!

Here is the link to their camera:

Well, gosh. There are going to be a lot of little eaglets hatching in the next week. I could not even begin to count them but we have Captiva and, of course, my faves, Samson and Gabby up at NEFlorida.

It is windy and there are showers near the Jacksonville nest of Samson and Gabby today. It is currently 15 degrees C – wow. That is a whole lot cooler than Miami or Fort Myers who are both reporting high 20s today.

Here is the link to Gabby and Samson up at the NEFlorida Bald Eagle nest near Jacksonville. They are a great couple to watch. I put them and Harriet and M15 right up at the top of the ‘do not worry’ list. For those of you that do not know, this was the adult male, Samson’s, natal nest. He has great DNA. His parents were Romeo and Juliet. Samson hatched 23 December 2013. He returned with his mate Gabby after the 2018-19 sadness with his parents. The American Eagle Federation gives this account, “However, the 2018-2019 season was very different, as several large mature eagles disturbed the peace and tranquility of this nest. The expectations of the season ended in heartache as Juliet returned to the nest with an injury and was subsequently driven from the nest by a rival just days before the eggs were to hatch, leaving Romeo to do the work of two. When an egg hatched on Christmas Day 2018, a female eagle following Romeo to the nest swooped down and took the hatchling. This was not A2.” The A2 they are referring to is Gabby who later partnered with Samson. Romeo and Juliet raised 19 eaglets to fledge in 10 seasons.

Gabby and Samson raised two their first season, Jules and Romey. They fledged Legacy – one spectacular juvenile – last breeding season. I am really looking forward to this year. Can you tell?

It is hot on the SWFlorida nest of Harriet and M15 today. All I can say about E19 and E20 is that they are absolutely precious. Harriet is keeping them cool.

You can see that Harriet is shading them but the two eaglets have moved into shady patches on the nest, too. They are older than Ron and Rita’s chicks and are moving quickly around this large nest.

Down in Port Lincoln, Australia, there are wee showers. It looks like Falky did have the nest reservation. He spent the afternoon, all evening on the nest, and he will be there, hopefully, to get the morning breakfast fish in about 3 or 4 hours.

Falky and Ervie had quite the dust up yesterday. Falky might have thought Ervie was not going to honour his reservation departure time!

Falky decided to lay down duckling style late in the day.

It is hard to see him but he is on the nest, nearly in the same spot. For some reason they all stand or sleep there. Must be something magical about that space.

Just look at this beautiful fledgling. Se McGregor posted a recent image taken of WBSE 27 by the National Parks and Wildlife Services of NSW. Gorgeous. She is doing well. Let us all send warm wishes for continual improvement. Many rehabbers believe it takes two years to fully train an eagle that has not been trained by its parents. I wonder how long they will keep 27? I hope a long time til this bird is confident and strong.

Annie and Grinnell continue to bond and have total control of their territory. Cal Falcons posted an image of Grinnell with a large crop on the ledge on National Bird Day.

Other than the death of R3, things in Bird World are looking pretty good at noon on a Friday. It is -27 C on the Canadian Prairies dropping to -32 later today. That is exactly 54 degrees C different than the temperatures Harriet and M15 and Ron and Rita are experiencing in southern Florida today. That is a 129.5 degrees F difference! Whew. Temperature extremes.

Thank you for joining me this morning. I will continue to monitor the reservation rota at Port Lincoln! Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: WRDC Eagle Nest, SWFlorida Eagle Cam and D Pritchett, NEFlorida Eagle Cam and the AEF, KNF Eagle Cam, Port Lincoln Osprey Project, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Center FB Page, and Cal Falcons Twitter Page.

Oh, Tiny Little!

Oh, what a relief to go to the Foulshaw Moss Osprey Nest and see all three of White YW and Blue 35’s fledglings on the nest. Big Sibling 462 had the fish.

Of course, Tiny Little had her back of tricks open to try and get that fish and sibling 462 knows that Tiny Little is getting much better at stealing fish.

So, 462 decides that the best approach is to take off with the fish in talon! Meanwhile, 464 is at the back of the nest, only partly paying attention.

Tiny Little reminds me so much of Tiny Tot from the Achieva Osprey Nest. No matter what, Tiny Tot would dig around in the nest and find food. That is precisely what Tiny Little is doing right now. The first thing she eyes is a nice fishtail.

She eats all of the fish and horks down that tail like the pro at self-feeding she now is.

Then after digging around a little more, look what she finds. Wow. A great big piece of fish. Way to go, Tiny Little.

When she finished those treasures, Tiny Little began to move sticks around. Was this to pass the time? Or was it in search of more hidden treasure?

Both Tiny Little and 464 ‘think’ that a fish drop is imminent. They have seen an adult, and they are both food calling.

Each has tried to find the perfect position to get in close and take the fish from dad, White YW.

And now both have flown off the nest! That fish drop must have been made somewhere else, off-camera. It was so good to see all of them but, particularly, Tiny Little. She is looking really well.

News has come in from the Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation that this year’s chicks, eight of them taken from nests in Scotland, were successfully translocated to Poole Harbour. They were placed in cardboard boxes filled with moss and closed – kept in a temperature-controlled van. The party stopped in Staffordshire for the night. The chicks were fed then and fed again in the morning. They have all been at Poole Harbour for about a fortnight and will be released the first week in August. Let us hope that the birds that have been translocated return and help build up the population of Ospreys at Poole Harbour in the future.

Roy Dennis’s website is full of information. You should check it out when you have time. Roy Dennis is one of the main individuals responsible for bringing back the Ospreys and other large raptors to the UK. Here is the link:

There should be another hatch – WBSE 28 – today. Indeed, maybe Lady isn’t given up secrets, and we already have two soft little chicks. Meanwhile, WBSE 27 could not get any cuter. It is hard to imagine that this little soft ball of down will be a big sea eagle by October!

I did check on the Collins Marsh chick before things got hectic. By 13:13, the wee babe had at least three feedings. Oh, that was really wonderful to see. This is not a popular Osprey nest. When I look down and see ‘3 people watching’, I know precisely who those three are! This is an image of the last fish delivery around 13:00.

Despite two earlier feedings, our wee babe is happy to tuck in. So three feedings in one morning. That is sometimes better than what happens in an eight hour period on this nest. Yeah, dad! Keep it up. This wee one needs to really grow and begin to put on some fat, too.

Ferris Akel has been out finding that beautiful Roseate Spoonbill, and he has made another video of it fishing. In past images or videos, this gorgeous bird has been in the trees. Here that is for your pleasure:

The White Storks at Mlade Buky are doing fantastic. They come to the nest for food, but it also appears that they are now spending time off the nest doing their own fishing. Here are some images from the late afternoon.

There were always only two storks on the nest. The other one must be catching enough fish to try and be on the nest when Father Stork returns to feed.

They did a lot of preening.

They also did a lot of looking for Father Stork, but he did not show up.

One flies off to the left. That bird will fly over the rooftops and fly beyond the highway on the other side of the tree line about 3/4 from the bottom of the image.

Then the other one departs. What beautiful wings.

Tomorrow I will bring you some more news from the Gough Island Recovery Project to eradicate the mice and rats killing the Sooty and Tristan albatross chicks and adults.

The only news in my garden included the ‘usual gang’ was a Golden-Crowned Sparrow this morning. Not very exotic for sure, but since the heatwave came through, there are fewer ‘visitors’ to the garden despite plenty of water and food.

“Golden-crowned sparrow” by jimculp@live.com is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Thank you so much for joining me today. We will hope that Tiny Little landed another fish before the fishing stops for the day. Regardless she looks really great – and that necklace of hers is more prominent along with her stout legs. I hope you are all doing well. I will look forward to bringing you updates and news about the Gough Island Recovery tomorrow. Take care! Stay well.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screenshots: Cumbrian Wildlife Trust and the Foulshaw Moss Osprey Nest, Sea Eagle Cam, Birdlife Australia, and the Sydney Discovery Centre, Collins Marsh Nature Centre Osprey Nest, and the Mlade Buky White Stork Cam.