Saturday Morning in Bird World

25 June 2022

You will almost always hear that ‘the parents know where the fledgling is’. Certainly the eye sight of the raptors is acute. I remember someone saying at one of the Cal Falcons Q & A sessions that Annie might have actually ‘seen’ Grinnell get hit by the car. Tonight, the question on everyone’s mind is: do the Bald Eagle adults at the ND-LEEF nest know where ND16 is?

It is good to remember just why the term ‘eagle eyed’ came about and how the adults might be able to see 16 at a distance.

https://www.allaboutvision.com/resources/eagle-vision/

Mum landed on the nest tonight with a really nice sized fish. Little Bit was ready to chow down and then ND15 arrived. Mum hesitated. When 15 took the fish, she flew over Little Bit almost knocking it off the nest to land on the other side. ND15 really enjoyed the fish. Little Bit tried to steal and got a bite or two but appeared to understand fully the limitations of the space and did not push it. Of course, Little Bit 17 is hoping that 15 will leave something!!!!!!! Mum returned to the nest. They are really trying to lure 16 back to the nest with fish. That branch breaking would have been traumatic and extremely frightening. Is ND16 really close by?

Mum lands with that nice fish. Little Bit is right there at its head. Then 15 jumps down from the branch it is perching on. Rats!

Little Bit continues to smell and pick a bit at the fish but Mum is waiting. She wants 16 to show up at the nest. Surely fish would do that!

ND15 comes closer and thinks that it wants that fish – s/he didn’t eat that much in the morning.

Mum practically rips Little Bit off the nest when she flies to the other side. 15 is mantling the fish and Little Bit is right on the spot where the nest is breaking off some more. Lump in throat. Holding my breath. I think it had to be when the Mispillion Osprey Nest mum pulled her two chicks off the nest unknowingly when she flew off after an intruder that caused me to really worry for Little Bit at that moment.

That is really a nice fish. 15 is enjoying it and Little Bit is watching.

The problem with the nest is that it is so narrow that Little Bit can’t do any fancy ‘snatch and grab’ manoeuvres or he might fall off.

Oh, but Little Bit wants some of that fish. Just look. He is trying to go under 15.

Ah, look. Little Bit got himself a small bite and pulled back.

Mum is looking. I really do hope that the parents know where 16 is. If you watched the Redding Eagle nest this season, you will know that Sentry fledged first and wasn’t seen for four days (I think that is correct) and then he was back at the nest with everyone.

Is 15 finished eating the fish? Little Bit is keeping a close eye.

Little Bit moves in.

Little Bit is mantling at 19:49:56. If you are unfamiliar with the term, it is when a raptor spreads its wings out full dipping slightly downward to hide what prey item they have. It helps them protect their food from snatch and grabs. They are also saying, “This is mine! Stay away!” Of course, it doesn’t always work. I am sure glad Little Bit got some fish even if it was the tail.

Little Bit is all finished!

I wonder if there will be more prey deliveries tonight? Will the parents have a fish and fly around the area trying to get 16 to fly out and follow them? Is 16 a wee bit lost? Unfortunately, we do not know the answers to those questions. Fingers crossed 16 is back tomorrow! But, I really do not want to see Mum and the three kids at once. Just imagine.

Dad delivered ‘something’ to the ND-LEEF nest at 09:28. Little Bit was hungry and immediately went to grab it.

There are reports that 16 was seen doing a fly by. Watchers report that twigs from higher up have fallen on the nest breaking off small parts. The nest is certainly very precarious. I know that Lindsay Grossman and others are alert to this fact. The nice thing is that Little Bit’s tail feathers are growing longer! You can see from the image above.

It is beautiful at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta and Kana’kini, Sky, and Ahote but no one is home. :(((((

Everything you might want to know and some things you didn’t know you wanted to know in Rutland’s newsletter about the ringing of Blue 33 and Maya’s three chicks at the Manton Bay nest.

https://www.lrwt.org.uk/blog/guest-blog/ringing-manton-bay-chicks?fbclid=IwAR1yFS88wQov1sVZicXFG2fwFOXyVagOpmcxLlf2_DwmZf4PNOAdOAQS7aI

Takoda knows where the nest is and where the food comes in. He is perched up on a branch ready to leap down during the day and is sleeping nearly in the same spot during the night. Wish I could put this lovely strong nest at the National Arboretum under Little Bit for awhile – or fly in one of Ron Magill’s chair nests until Little Bit fledges.

Dorcha and the chicks are waking up. It is 04:28 am on the Loch Arkaig nest and the sun has been up for a bit. Louis will soon be bringing in breakfast.

You can now see that the two chicks are too big for Dorcha to brood.

Then it started raining. No breakfast fish yet. Dorcha has everyone under cover.

Rain does not deter Louis from fishing or flying for his family. He delivers a nice sized fish even though big drops are falling. Dorcha is delighted.

Everyone dried off in a couple of hours. Louis arrives at the nest at 07:15 to check on things. He will return with another big fish at 11:32:24.

Just look at the size of those two Bobs! Incredible!

It started off as a rainy day at Loch of the Lowes, too. Laddie had a fish on the nest and Blue NC0 has been doing some supplemental fishing when intruders are in the area. Today Laddie has delivered four fish – not all whoppers but 4 in total.

No wonder Telyn is sleeping on the Dyfi Osprey nest’s perch! The three Bobs are taking up the entire nest! Ringing this week – and names. Can’t wait. No problems at this nest – not one other than room. 🙂

No problems with Aran’s deliveries at the Glaslyn nest for Mrs G and the triplets. For those of you that are just starting to watch this nest in Wales, Mrs G is the oldest Osprey in the UK at approximately 22-23 this year. Iris in the US is 29 this year.

It’s now 19:41 and Dylan has brought in what is most likely the last fish for the day to the Llyn Clywedog nest in Wales. Everyone home. No problem with the Goshawk that I am aware of late in the day.

Wing flapping is the order of the day at the Manton Bay nest with its three big healthy girls.

Three little Bobs under Dory at the Boathouse Osprey nest on Hog Island, Maine.

Yesterday, ‘H’ reports that there were 9 fish delivered to the Mispillion nest – a combination of both Dad and Mum fishing with some small ones. That seems to be quite a bit of fish but perhaps not if they were so small.

This morning the two were sharing a lovely fish – being fed by Mum.

All three become distracted by an intruder. The bird on the left the largest was still eating and the one on the right had finished.

All of a sudden the osplet on the left attacks the one on the right. It appears that the one on the right looked it ‘directly in the eye’.

It is the osplet on the right that is going to finish this fight. How dare the other one attack it?! Dominance issues for sure. They are pretty equal.

‘H’ sent me the image below. Thanks H! It is pretty frightening when you see two osplets on top of a very high nest fighting.

It’s 11:08 and both have settled down. It looks really hot on the nest today. That could have set off the beaking. If you are wondering, — yes, one or both could go over the edge of the nest in this type of tumble. At the Port Lincoln Osprey nest, one chick was thrown off at the nest by the eldest at 66 days several years ago.

One of the intruders that attacked the Cape Henlopen State Park Osprey nest in Lewes, Delaware several weeks ago was back on the platform nest ironically watching for intruders this morning. I wonder if it is Mum that is coming around? She lost her mate, her three chicks, and her nest to this bird.

Electra was working on her nest at the Cowlitz PUD this morning. That just rips at your heart. Three beautiful babies this year all carried off by an eagle. Can’t imagine it.

I have not seen any updates for the Pitkin County osplet that was in guarded condition yesterday after being pulled off the nest when the female got her talon caught in fishing line. One of the chicks perished in the fall.

This is a brief look at what is going on in Bird World. I am keeping a close eye on the ND-LEEF nest. Little Bit 17 needs at least another week before fledging. Is that nest going to hold?

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. Take care everyone!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Pitkin County Ospreys, Cowlitz PUD, Cape Henlopen State Park Ospreys, Mispillion Harbour Ospreys, Explore.org and Audubon, Dyfi Osprey Project, Bwywd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and Scottish Wildlife Trust, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code and the Woodland Trust, CarnyXWild, ND-LEEF, LRWT, Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, and the NADC-AEF.

Late Thursday and early Friday in Bird World

23-24 June 2022

With all of the troubles in the Osprey nests, I missed that Chase & Cholyn’s only eaglet of 2022, Lancer, fledged on the 22nd. Here is a video of that first flight!

This is the very latest information from the Pitkin Osprey Nest.

This was one of the original postings if you are not familiar with what happened at this nest.

These poor Mums who have lost their chicks. Just like Mum at Pitkin, Electra at Cowlitz PUD continues to return to her empty nest after the Bald Eagle took all three of her very healthy osplets. Heart wrenching.

There are three beautiful osplets in a nest in the Ramuka Forest in Poland. They are a little older than the ones at the Pitkin Nest. Napi has just brought in a fish for Lotewka and the two chicks. The oldest hatched on 24 May and the youngest on the 26th of May. The oldest is 30 days old today (Thursday) and the youngest is 28 days. They are doing so well. Napi looks tiny next to those big chicks.

I was able to catch a late feeding at the Mispillion Osprey Nest in Delaware. You might recall that Mum removed her pretty yellow mesh and has replaced it now with a bright green-blue ‘something’. I want to say rope but it doesn’t look like rope. Anyone have any ideas? I hope that Mum removes this before any member of the family gets tangled!

When I did my last check on Little Bit 17 and the ND-LEEF nest, Little Bit was fine. Prey had been delivered and so far – fingers crossed – the nest is holding. ND15 had found another branch on which to perch but, to my knowledge there had been no sighting of ND16. When the branch broke that both 15 and 16 were on, both flew away. It had to be quite shocking and traumatic. As many times as I got furious at 16, I really do not wish for that lovely bird to come to any harm.

ND15 has found a strong branch on which to perch.

Little Bit is going to sleep duckling style. I just wish he would move away from that edge. I don’t know if it is lens distortion but it certainly appears to be leaning down as if it could give way. Optical illusion – let’s hope.

The ND-LEEF nest is looking more precarious where 17 was resting yesterday. Oh, I wish Little Bit would find a place to perch on a branch. Little Bit has beautiful wings and in days he is ‘old enough’ to fly but, his tail still seems not long enough.

Dawn is just breaking at the Dyfi Osprey nest in Wales of Idris and Telyn. The three chicks are old enough to sleep in the nest without Mum who is up on the perch with dad. they will be ringed next week!

The wee one – Bobby Bach is what he is called at this nest – will be 4 weeks old tomorrow. Big Bob will be 31 days and Middle Bob is 29 days. Ringing next week – the norm is 35-38 days but not later than the 43rd as they could bolt then. Telyn is giving all of them their lunch. Nice big healthy chicks.

It is a bit of a misty morning at the Loch of the Lowes. I can see the remnants of a fish left over from last night on the nest.

At one point, Blue NC0 was on the nest sleeping. It takes a lot out of the females during breeding season. Cornell Bird Labs estimate that by the times the chicks fledge the females will have lost 30% of their body weight. They also need to replace all that calcium. It is not as easy as it might look even in such a beautiful place. I have mentioned it before but I like to in case someone missed it – no one is allowed around the loch during breeding season, from 1 April to the end of September. That is so there is no disruption to the birds other than other intruder birds!

The two surviving chicks at the Llyn Brenig nest are quite small in comparison to the two at the Loch of the Lowes. Mr AX6 has delivered a morning fish much to the delight of Mum and the two chicks who seem to have really grown over the past couple of days. It isn’t a huge fish and it is alive! Oh, dear. Dad did not take any for himself – maybe because it was so small.

There are three little osplets at the Fortis Exshaw Nest in Canmore, Alberta. The wind is ripping through tonight. Thank goodness it is not as hot there as it is here. Rain is forecast over the next two days. I really hope that Dad can get fish on the nest with the wind and rain – so far he is doing well. The little ones are doing some beaking but this is pretty natural at this stage. We want to see it stop, however!

This is the link to this streaming cam.

Oh, those babies are so tiny at the Hog Island osprey nest in Maine. It is the home of Dory and Skiff. I mentioned the little one’s names yesterday but just a reminder that they are Schooner, Slipjack, and Sloop. Dory is a first time Mum. Fingers crossed especially when there are three!

Oh, they are just soooooooo tiny.

Skiff has brought in a fish for everyone – you can just see the peach and pink from the sun setting over the water. Cross your fingers and send good wishes to this family!

There are three little Bobs at the Osoyoos Osprey nest in British Columbia. Osoyoos is located close to the US border in an area that is known to be one of the warmest spots in our country. Last year the chicks died during the Pacific Northwest heat wave. Fingers crossed for this year.

Aran is such a great fisher. Him and Mrs G have one of the best locations – except for the intruders. Kids were sure happy to see that whopper today…and so was Mrs G – ever anxious to get at it! There will be some for her, too.

Someone asked if the males feed the osplets. Many do! Some of the males really do enjoy feeding their chicks. Some females will also fly out and fish once the chicks are big enough they will not be predated. Blue NC0 at Loch of the Lowes is a great fisher.

Here is Louis at Loch Arkaig feeding the chicks while Dorcha looks on.

The storklets of Jan and Janika are to be moved to a forest enclosure soon. They are still being fed by the remote ‘Dad’ and look at how well they are doing.

The four Windsbach kestrels are still with us. Europe is going through a real heat wave and they are huddled in the corner out of the sun.

They perk up when Mum comes in with their tea time snack!

Ahote arrives at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta early hoping to get in line for breakfast before anyone else!

Lancer is at Two Harbours waiting for breakfast too!!!!!!!

Checking on Ervie. His latest tracking shows no visits to the barge. PLO think he has gotten the message that he is not welcome! Did I miss another visit to the nest? Would love to see Ervie! Looks like he is fishing close to the shore. Puffers???

I would like to say that things have slowed down and are uneventful after the past couple of weeks of troubles. The tree at ND-LEEF is very worrying. The staff are excellent and they have been out looking for ND16. I have heard nothing about 16 being seen. 15 has been perched on another branch. It is 17 of course that is the worry. That eaglet fought so hard to live that it would be a real tragedy if the rest of that nest collapses before it can fly. I wish it would get up on one of the branches! Send real positive energy that way! In other news Lindsay has been up on the Campanile and that is a good thing. If you are wondering how long L3 will be in rehab, probably 3-6 weeks plus flight training. They should teach her how to hunt at the same time so that she is insured of success once she leaves the Centre. And they will probably band L3 and we will find out if she is a she or a he.

Take care everyone. I hope that you have a wonderful day. Thank you so much for being with me. It is pretty quiet in Bird World. I will be back tomorrow. See you then!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Cowlitz PUD, Explore.Org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, Ospreys Online-Ramucka Forest, Mispillion Ospreys and DDNR, Pitkin County Open Spaces and Trails, ND-Leef, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Fortis Exshaw, Explore.org and Audubon, Osoyoos Ospreys, Bywyt Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery, and the Woodland Trust, EMU, Windsbach Kestrels and PLO.

Monday in Bird World

20 June 2022

It was hot but -not like yesterday- and the weather reports says it is currently raining – again – and will do so for a few hours! The heat and the rain have done amazing things in the garden including causing the tomato plants to grow so tall that they will not have to be transplanted into bigger pots with bamboo poles. They are the same ones that I always plant that have more or less just sat there for 4-5 years with about a dozen tomatoes on each. I understand not, more fully, why the gardeners and their crew are always busy and often use machetes to clean up the lawns and beds in the West Indies.

I was looking for information for another nest and I came across a 2020 Zoom conversation about the ND-LEEF Osprey nest – home to Little Bit 17 this year. Some of you might be interested in the discussion – the first sighting of the nest, the size, how many ospreys in the area, etc. Those stats would have changed over 2 years but they are interesting and helpful. The conversation starts at 26:28. There are some audio issues at the beginning.

The three osplets at the Dyfi nest of Idris and Telyn will be ringed next week. The precise date will be announced one day prior. There is a guessing game going on as to the gender of the chicks on the Dyfi chat. Have a look, take a guess. It is all in good fun. The other day Idris brought in a Twaite Shad. The record catch of that particular species in Wales is 2 lb 2 oz. It is possible that Idris now holds the Welsh record! Hey – he’s fabulous – Daddy Longlegs. You gotta’ love him. Of course, he brought in another whopper not long ago.

BTW. Telyn is one of those Rutland gals that found a home in Wales. Manton Bay (Telyn’s Mum, Maya) has 3 girls this year we need some Welsh boys!!!!!!!! Although I think it is GGB on this nest. We will find out next week.

‘H’ introduced me to a new nest this morning by way of a question. I wonder how many are watching the Mispillion Harbor Osprey Cam at the DuPont Nature Centre? The nest is located on the Mispillion River and Cedar Creek on the west shore. There were four eggs. There are month old osplets on the nest currently- two of them. I cannot confirm what happened to the other two eggs.

‘H’ told me some wonderful stories about this nest – much appreciated! But the one about the piece of yellow material is just brilliant. Mum is apparently obsessed with it and it flew off one day and she went and retrieved it. She certainly isn’t using it to camouflage the chicks so why? Is it nice and soft and you don’t get poked with the sticks from the nest? It is quite a lovely colour and it is surprising how Ospreys get drawn to bright coloured items – Richmond -I think Rosie has broken him of bringing them to the nest and Jack – Harriet still contends with all those toys.

I did not know this nest before this morning. Never watched it. It is on the Mispillion River and Cedar Creek in Delaware – another nest in Delaware. The area is now protected so there is no development.

Dad brought in a whole fish this afternoon. Very nice. Most often the males will eat the heads. He must not be hungry.

Here is the link to their streaming cam.

Osprey Watch shows this population of Osprey nests in the area. Wow.

Laddie just brought in fish 7 to the Loch of the Lowes nest. He was unable to fish and not seen for 36 hours. It is assumed that he was busy getting rid of intruders other than an injury. There are definitely fish in the loch. Blue NC0 must be so full she will pop – I hope Laddie is eating those fish, too. Big and Middle must be too full to even move.

Dylan continues to bring in nice trout – his favourite I think – to the Llyn Clywedog nest. Those three Bobs are fantastic! Seren is quite happy with the deliveries, too.

There they are – 3 big girls with all their bling at the Manton Bay nest at Rutland of Blue 33 and Maya. All the chatter is their arrival in two years time looking for a mate and a nest in Wales. We will wait and see.

It is 16:58 at the Poole Harbour Osprey nest and Blue 022 has just brought in the 4th fish of the day to CJ7 and the kids.

I can see one nice chick’s head up there for the fish.

We have the names of Richmond and Rosie’s osplets. Here is the announcement from SF Ospreys today.

I continue to miss much that is happening at Llyn Brenig. Both of the chicks are still with us but this nest is plagued by intruders. It is unclear how much fish get delivered. The babes look good, though.

Poor Dorcha. It looks like her weather is the same as ours. She doesn’t always catch a break. Still, Louis is great to get the fish on the nest for all of them regardless.

Louis lands with another fish just as I took the screen capture above. Oh, how splendid. Full crops at bedtime.

I hope that Dorcha gets her own fish. That salmon looks good and she is one super mum. My goodness I have forgotten how many times she has been blown tail over head off that nest this season. She is fantastic. Kids are lucky to have her and Louis. Very lucky.

The Glaslyn nest is doing fine, too. Aran has brought in the tea time fish and you can hear the sheep bleating in the background. How idyllic. Mrs G and the kids seem happy.

Two little heads peeking up above that large nest bowl at Fortis Exshaw in Canmore, Alberta. After what happened at Patuxent, I am really starting to wonder if someone doesn’t need to check this nest after breeding season and secure that middle and fill it in. (It could be done now – the osplets will not jump out and it should be a quick temporary fill in).

Electra continues to visit the Cowlitz PUD nest in Washington State where the Bald Eagle took all three of her babies. Heart aches for her.

It looks like it is a beautiful Tuesday morning in the Sydney Olympic Forest. Lady is rolling the eggs and getting ready for the day. Still a few weeks to hatch. Dad has been busy bringing in fish, giving Lady a break and taking his turn incubating the two eggs.

I do not know how many of you saw this. Our dear Grinnell Jr spent the first night after fledging up in a tree. John Davis shot this footage and Cal Falcons posted it. He has since visited The Campanile and I am sure missing the sound of his ‘voice’.

The two worrying nests – Loch of the Lowes – and the ND-LEEF are fine today. Laddie has quite outdone himself and could have shared half that fish with Little Bit at ND-LEEF. 17 did a nice of the end of that fish this morning. I hope there is more later at the nest. Both ND15 and ND16 have branched. Ahote still seems to be the ‘star’ at getting prey at the West End. What a juvenile that third hatch has turned out to be. He is one to watch.

Thank you for joining me. I hope all of you are well. Stay safe. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Inside the Nest, Dyfi Osprey Project, Mispillion Osprey Harbour Cam, Osprey Watch, Friends of the Loch of the Lowes and Scottish Wildlife Trust, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, CarnyXWild, LRWT, Poole Harbour Ospreys, SF Bay Ospreys, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Postcode Lottery and the Woodland Trust, Fortix ExShaw, Cowlitz PUD, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, John Davis and the Cal Falcons.

World Albatross Day and other news in Bird World

18 June 2022

Everyone reading my blog loves birds —-that is what we have in common. We love great big raptors and tiny little hummingbirds. Some favour Ospreys because they eat fish over Eagles but, in the end, I do not think any of us would harm our feathered friends deliberately. Indeed, many of you care for birds, volunteer or work at wildlife rehabilitation centres, make donations, feed the birds in your garden, etc. Whatever you can to make their lives better. So, when you read the following article, you are going to get mad. I found myself remembering the two men who took the juvenile osprey chicks off the light stand (somewhere – it has gone out of my mind) and killed them rather than waiting til they fledged to change the bulbs. After you read this, take a deep breath. Then, if you live in the US, write to your local officials. I do often wonder if the people doing these terrible deeds – how would they feel if they were treated this way? Birds and animals are sentient beings.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jun/06/us-bird-flu-outbreak-millions-of-birds-culled-in-most-inhumane-way-available

Every June we have a problem in our City with tree cutters! While the City of Winnipeg is priding itself on planting 1 million trees, it has probably hired cutters to cut down some very old Maple trees that are not diseased or damaged. Do they check for nests? No. Last year, it was a battle with our public utility Manitoba Hydro and a Cooper’s Hawk nest. After lobbying by hundreds of us, Manitoba Hydro backed off and agreed not to trim the trees around their lines until nesting season was over.

Tree cutting should be limited to times when birds are not nesting. Simple. Write – scream – get your friends – if you see trimming going on and you know that there is a nest there!

There is still some anxiety at the Loch of the Lowes nest. Laddie LM12 did not deliver a fish to Blue NC0 until 10am. Big was unkind to Middle. What in the world is going on at this nest? 12 days ago Laddie brought in 9 fish. Oh, I wonder if he is not injured in some way and we cannot see it.

In contrast, Louis – despite the gale force wind and rain – has brought in at least 4 if not 5 large fish for Dorcha and the chicks today.

It really seems that there is something amiss at Loch of the Lowes. Again, is Laddie in some way injured that we cannot obviously tell?

Little QT chick is flapping her wings in the strong winds blowing over her nest at Taiaroa Head. Soon all of the fluffy baby down will be off those wings and our beautiful little fluff ball will look more and more like her parents, OGK and YRK.

The 19th of June is World Albatross Day. Of course, it is today in New Zealand and all other countries in different time zones. Many of you – and I – watch the Royal Cam Albatross Family on Taiaroa Head, New Zealand – YRK, OGK, and little QT. Did you know that OGK and YRK have been together since 2006? They are so lovely. OGK has melted my heart since the time he used to come and sit next to Pippa Atawhai.

I am forever grateful for the NZ DOC for intervening in the care of the chicks with their supplemental feedings, provisions against fly strike, and aid to them if injured. QT has had many supplemental feedings this season. While the cause is unknown, it could be warming waters and also large trawlers emptying the sea of the fish.

The Albatross Task Force posted 3 ways that 99% of the Albatross deaths could be mitigated. Here they are:

So how can you help? You can begin by purchasing fish that is not harvested using gill nets. Here is some information for those in the UK from the Task Force:

It is summer and there are parties and weddings. If you are going to use confetti – read this posting that showed up on my FB feed and think about using leaves for confetti. How brilliant and how sustainable.

Lindsay fledged early this morning at the Cal Falcons scrape on the grounds of the University of California at Berkeley. Here is younger brother, Grinnell Jr, looking out of the stonework wondering what it is like out there.

The hawklet being cared for by the Eagle family on Gabriola Island branched this morning. It is a beautiful scene when the Big Bald Eagle female feeds her ‘little baby’.

The hawklet has been given the name Malala meaning survivor. You might recall Malala Yousafzai, the young Afghan girl, who was almost killed by the Taliban because she wanted to go to school. Happily she graduated from Oxford after surviving. We all hope that the hawklet will live a long and prosperous life!

GROWLS is accepting donations for a new and much better camera. Christian Sasse said they they were sold an interior product -I sure hope they raise the funds. I wonder if this would ever happen again? It is rare – or it is thought that it is rare – eaglets adopting a bird as their own that has been brought in as a prey item.

Ferris Akel’s tour today ended up at the Cornell campus. He caught all of the family. Well done, Ferris. L4 has not fledged and people should not worry. There are eagles who have not fledged even though their siblings have for weeks. There is nothing wrong with L4. He is going to fly in his own time.

One of the Ls on Bruckner Hall. She will later fly to the top of the Rice building calling for prey.

Another L on the brick wall between the Soccer and Track fields.

The third fledgling on another building. I have always relied on the belly band to differentiate between them but it is impossible now unless I see them together. Gosh they are such gorgeous Red-tail Hawk chicks.

L4 was on the railing of the natal nest light stand.

The intruder couple at the Cape Henlopen Osprey platform in Lewes, Delaware were on and off the structure during the day.

Little Bit 17 had a good day. He is at the top of my list for checking followed by Loch of the Lowes. He had lots of raccoon and an entire fish to himself (minus a few bites going to 16), scrapes off the nest, and a little bit of Bluegill that Mum delivered at 15:57. So far four fish deliveries- 2 Blue gills, 1 salmon, and 1 small mouth bass (list by Jim one of the chatters – thank you). Those eagle-eye chatters also observed two PSs – fantastic.

At 19:39:48 Little Bit was eating the leftover bones with some meat on them by the rim of the nest. He was watching and when the older sibling finished, 17 made his move to get some of that. You can see the remains of the Raccoon being moved about on the nest.

Mum is in and all three were up at the table being fed. Oh, what a lovely image. I just wish she had a pantry full of fish and filled each of them up to the crown of their head.

Isn’t this just a beautiful image? Mom feeding her three eaglets – and knowing that each of them will fledge. One or two very soon.

Mum was still feeding them the remainder of that Raccoon when I last checked. Little Bit was loving it. He has eaten well today. Everyone is just elated.

Last thing today. Each one of us was horrified when the Bald Eagle cam and took Electra’s osprey chicks right off the nest. One of our readers ‘B’ lives very close to Lake Sacajawea in Cowlitz County, Washington. I asked her what might have changed to cause the eagles to go after the osprey nest. She gave the following information, “The rivers here are running high and probably muddy so fishing might be difficult. This has been one of the coldest, wettest springs on record in the northwest. Another day of rain today, temperature only 58° F.” Certainly Bald Eagles are opportunistic feeders – fish, road kill, etc. but the weather might have played a big part in this catastrophic event.

Poor Electra continues to come to the nest. She is still broody and probably in shock. Send her special wishes. This is so difficult seeing her there on that nest with three chicks doing well this year.

Thank you so much for joining me. It is a very windy evening but the sun is out. I managed to get a long walk in today (for me) and it is now time to go and check on all those weeds that grew over night. I will also be marvelling at all of the sunflowers that are growing in the garden thanks to the birds. I am leaving them and hoping that they grow high and then the birds can eat them in the fall. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Cowlitz PUD, Ferris Akel Tours, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and Scottish Wildlife Trust. Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery and the Woodland Trust, Cornell Bird Lab and NZ DOC, Albatross Task Force, Keeper of the Cheerios Blog, Cal falcons, GROWLS, Cape Henlopen State Park, and ND-LEEF.

Video of Eagle taking Cowlitz PUD osplet off nest —- without sound.

15 June 2022

Apologies for the first video posting. I did not realize that the sound from the Ferris Akel Tour was on it!

Very sad. Intruders are to be taken ever so seriously. That wee Middle Bob was so enjoying his fish dinner.

The nest at Cowlitz Washington had such tragedy last year with the hottest summer ever and little fish and siblicide with all osplets dying. These three were doing so well. Big Bob was getting those lovely juvenile feathers and everyone seemed to be growing with the nest being OK. Then this!

It has been a very bad year all around the world.

Thank you to the Cowlitz PUD streaming cam where I took my video clip.

Eagle steals osplet off Cowlitz PUD Osprey Nest!

15 June 2022

I was always cautious about watching the Cowlitz PUD Osprey nest after the death of the chicks last year due to the extreme heat, siblicide, and starvation. Tonight as I was listening to Ferris Akel’s tour of the Cornell Campus to see Big Red, Arthur, and the Ls, I received word from ‘C’ that an Eagle had taken a chick at Cowlitz. That was only a few minutes ago so it was approximately 1630-1700 nest time.

We must always keep in mind that intruders can, ultimately, be deadly. We have seen this too much in the last weeks. The parents have to protect their territory and if they leave the nest, anything can happen. Additionally, they are not able to hunt or fish. Chicks starve. Siblicide occurs. It is an extremely viscous circle.

This year there were three healthy fat little osplets on this nest. The mother was busy feeding them a fresh fish when the intruder flew over head. She flew off the nest.

This is just so sad. Here is the event as it unfolded.

Thank you ‘C’ for writing to me immediately.

Thank you to the Cowlitz PUD Osprey cam where I took my screen captures and video clip.

Tiny Little, Blue 35 and the fish – and other tales from Ospreyland 13 July 2021

I wanted to yell as loud as I could, ‘Go Tiny Little!’. There was a fish drop at the Foulshaw Moss Nest. Blue 462 had it in its talons.

Oh, what I forgot to tell you was that Tiny Little kept trying to steal that fish from Blue 462. Look at Blue 35 (mum) watching what is going on.

Tiny Tot finds the tail of the fish between Blue 462’s legs and trys to eat the fish from there! My friend ‘L’ says that Tiny Little is a ‘hoot’ – he is!

Tiny Little bothered his big sister so much that she moved the fish to the other side of the nest! But Tiny Little did not give up. He was more determined to try and distract Big Sister and grab that fish. Look how mum is watching everything that is going on. Tiny almost gets that fish a few times but he is not fully confident nor aggressive yet.

It must have been uncomfortable for Blue 462 to have Tiny right up there by his face. That is probably the point. At one point it looked like Tiny Little tried to grab the fish out of 462’s beak as he was pulling it off the bone.

Tiny Little pleads with mum to do something about that fish because he wants some of it and Blue 462 won’t share! Now Tiny Little didn’t do this just once, he went to speak to mum several times. There was, of course, no mention of Tiny Little finding that entire fish and not sharing it with anyone earlier!!!!!!

Blue 35 watched everything. What a smart mum she is! She waited and checked and then waited and when Blue 35 felt that Big Sis had enough fish, she walked over, took it, and flew away with it.

Here she is moving in to take it from Blue 462’s talons.

She pulls it over and once she has that fish secured she flies off the nest.

Why did she take my fish? says Blue 462. Tiny Tot is bewildered. He figures that is it for his bedtime dinner. Even Big Sis can’t figure it out. They stand there staring into space wondering what just happened.

Ah, Blue 35 wanted Big Sister off the nest. She took the fish and when the older sibling had left she returned to feed Tiny Little.

Ah, what a good mum Blue 35 is. She makes sure every one of her three babies has some fish.

When Tiny was full and off cleaning his beak, Blue 35 enjoyed a few bites of fish herself before Blue 462 flies in to try and get the precious fish tail! Mom starts feeding 462 again.

Wonder where 464 was? Did White YW give him a fish off camera?

Looks like Tiny Little won’t be sleeping alone tonight. Blue 462 is tired from all that flying! Both of these big babies have full tummies. Time to go to sleep.

As the sun was setting in Wales at the Dyfi Nest, Idris was out on his perch, Telyn was on the nest perch, and both Dysynnis and Ystwyth were on the nest ready for night-night as the train speeds by.

Over in the Clywedog Nest, Seren 5F was feeding Only Bob, Blue 496, his late night snack. He earned it today – he made a proper fledge this morning and he must be awfully tired. Gosh, this kiddo is big. Look at those legs!

As the pink of the sunset was coming over Loch of the Lowes, NC0 was on the nest watching her children, LM 1 and LM 2 as they flew around the loch.

Hopping to North America, Wattsworth and Electra were on the Cowlitz PUD Osprey Nest in Longview making a few nestorations. They lost both their chicks this year. The first to siblicide and the second to heat stroke during the 28 June extreme heat wave that hit the Pacific Northwest.

What will the Ospreys do as our planet heats up?

I don’t know if there are any repercussions on the Ospreys in Alberta from the smoke and fires to the west of them in British Columbia. Let us hope not. Legacy is growing and growing at the Red Deer Nest. It was hard to get a good image of her today but she had just finished a nice breakfast when I took this one.

And the two on the Fortis Exshaw Osprey Nest are progressing nicely as well. They are also growing really well now that the extreme heat is gone.

Kindness is 89 days old. She is on the Glacier Gardens Bald Eagle Nest up in Juneau, Alaska. She has been practicing her standing and is getting really good at it. Kindness is a ‘Northern’ Bald Eagle – not a specific species but because she is higher north in the Northern Hemisphere, she will be heavier and bigger than birds in the southern US. This is called the Bergman Allen Rule. Northern animals are typically heavier and larger than the southerly ones. This is related to the climate and physiological differences and their needs. The female Bald Eagles in the north, like Alaska, weight 4.5-6.35 kg or 10-14 lbs while in Florida the top weight for a female Bald Eagle would be 6.35 kg or 10 lbs. The males in Alaska are 3.62 -4.9 kg or 8-11 lbs while in Florida they are about 2.7 kg or 6 lbs. The average day for fledging at this nest is 89 days. (The average age for Bald Eagle nestlings in the rest of Alaska to fledge is 80 days). So we have some time yet with Kindness! Terrific.

Thank you so much for joining me. It was great fun with Tiny Little today. If you watch that nest check out Tiny Little’s rather ‘fat’ legs. Tiny Little is growing so much now that there is this notion that Tiny Little is a girl. Maybe we will find out one day. Take care everyone.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen shots: Glacier Gardens Bald Eagle Cam, Cumbrian Wildlife Trust, Scottish Wildlife and Friends of Loch of the Lowes, Dyfi Osprey Project, CarnyX Wild, Fortis Alberta ExShaw Osprey Nest, Fortis Alberta Red Deer Osprey Nest, and Cowlitz PUD,

Monday Nest Hopping – to keep my mind off Elsa

There were some lovely letters in my inbox today – articles and quesions – to keep me busy and to try and curtail me from checking on Tropical Storm Elsa every half hour. My friend Wicky – lover of books and hawks as long as they leave her songbirds alone – pointed my noise to an article in The New York Times by Margaret Renkl. Renkl is the author of Late Migrations, a fabulous book that I pick up often to simply read a single entry. Today in “Hawk. Lizard. Mole. Human”, Renkl speaks to the garden that she can see out her windows. She says, “How lucky I am to live in a home with windows. Against all odds – the encroachments of construction companies and lawn services and exterminators – those windows still open onto a world that stubbornly insists on remaining wild”.

Here is the link. I hope that you can open it. Renkl is a wonderful writer always leaving me appreciative of her love of our feathered friends and – others. Thank you, Wicky.

Like Renkl, I am grateful for my windows and astonished at what happens in a tiny bit of paradise inside the heat and concrete of a big and growing city. The birds have returned to the garden after the extreme heat. It is simply glorious seeing them splash around in the baths, having drinks, and sneaking off with some birdseed that looks like trail mix. The Blue Jays love the cashews and the berries and have gone through the large berry-insect-suet cylinder in a few days. There seem to be fewer insects every year. Is it the spraying of the caterpillars who eat the leaves off the trees? the greening of the lawns so that they look like they came out of a magazine, or the opposite where concrete is replacing grass? What are the birds to eat? Thankfully a growing number of people are willing to put the time and effort into helping them survive.

A lovely note came in from Finland, also, telling me about the ten Osprey nests. Thank you Tiny Toefan! I admit to not knowing enough about the Finnish nests but tonight while that storm is churning through the Gulf of Mexico towards Florida I am going to begin my education on these Ospreys. I want to learn more about them so I am just not an occasional observer. Tiny Toefan says that their Ospreys had a bit of a sad year. The attack of the Raven at the Satakunta Nest and the death of Alma spread quickly within the community of Osprey Lovers around the world. Our hearts broke for that dear family. Intruders, lack of food, and weather-related events have wrecked havoc with all the Ospreys this year.

Speaking of intruders, the UK nests are having issues with the returning two year old juveniles. They are all excited and flying about while the adults are trying to take care of their chicks that will soon be fledging. Today there were three intruders at the Glaslyn nest. All hatched at the Dyfi Nest. Z2 (Aeron, 2017) has chicks on the PC nest with 01 at Glaslyn. He quickly moved Hesgyn KA3 (2019) and Dinas KS6 (2018) along before they could do any lasting damage. Here is a video clip of all that action:

There were intruders at Foulshaw Moss Nest also. While watching Tiny Little get ready to stand up, in a quarter of a blink he was flat down like a pancake. For a moment I thought he had broken his leg – but, no – somewhere there were unwanted guests.

Did the adults teach them to do this? or is this 65 million year old instinct at work?

My friend, “R” also wrote today to tell me of another bird in the wrong place. It begs to ask how many instances of birds being where they shouldn’t are there? There is a Stellar’s Eagle in New Brunswick, Canada that should be in Russia and there were definitely birds out of location in Toronto earlier in the season.

The bird in England is a beautiful Black-browned Albatross. It should not be in the Northern Hemisphere! Imagine what a sight it was for those in Britain. I will follow up later on this story with more information. Thank you, “R”.

Here is the article. If it won’t open, try to copy and paste the URL in your browser. What in the world is this bird doing in England!?

https://www.thisisthecoast.co.uk/news/local-news/rare-albatross-sighting-on-yorkshire-coast/?fbclid=IwAR2lu8erfI5wv_J-I0gGdUvcJ2YM35wipWkXornJDTVtlAdiUgMs372NWRQ

In a swing through the Osprey nests, Tiny Tot is not on the Achieva Osprey Nest. She came in during the night and then left. The fireworks for the 4th must have been really disturbing to all the Osprey in that area. I am going to hope that Tiny Tot is down by the water catching fish to hold her until Elsa passes. She might also be looking for a place to hunker down til the storm passes. Again, because she is a fish eater and not an insect or nectar eater, Tiny Tot should be alright. It is the wind and flying debris if it gets bad. Well, it is worrisome. We can all image a hundred scenarios. I continue to run Laura Culley’s advice in my head – “worrying is nothing more than establishing an outcome in your mind before it happens. Don’t do it!” Need to put that mantra on repeat. Culley would tell me that these birds are much smarter than we are.

Electra has a huge fish that she is eating on the Cowlitz PUD Nest. It is good to see her eating well. She needs to regain her strength. On the other hand, it also makes me very sad. It would have been grand if that size of a fish came on that nest when the little tykes were alive. It might have made all the difference.

Give a shout out to the linemen of Fortis Alberta and to the streaming cam watchers who notified them that Legacy was tangled in monofilament line. They got there in time and saved her life. Legacy was so wound up in the line that she could not even lift her head to eat – and this was during the heat wave. She needed that hydration! The linemen responded to the call quickly. They removed the fishing line as well as the two dead chicks from the nest. Today, just look at her. Legacy is chowing down on a nice fish on the Fortis Red Deer Nest. There are still dark clouds but the rain has stopped and the nest seems to be drying out. That said the forecast is calling for rain tomorrow. The temperatures are in the 17 degree C range, a far cry from the extreme 40s C.

The two chicks on the Fortis Exshaw Nest at Canmore, Alberta seem to be doing alright, also. They are both being fed by mom. The skies are the same as those at Red Deer but they are calling for a thunderstorm tonight and rain tomorrow at the nest. Oh, stay dry little ones!

There seems to be a constant stream of intruders on the Hellgate Osprey Nest of Iris. It is prime real estate right next to the river and the fishing continues, despite the heat and low water, to be good for Iris. Louis has come and helped ward off the Dunrovin juveniles looking for a nest but sometimes, Iris has had to fend for herself The indignity of it all!

There are not enough good trees for the Ospreys and the placement of platforms has to be carefully evaluated because of all the territorial issues. It is confusing. On the one hand old timers tell me that Ospreys do not have territories but if you watch, Louis certainly claims this nest and the one at the baseball park as his even if he fishes in the same river as the other Ospreys. As more male chicks survive and return, careful planning will need to be undertaken for nests – if the water in the rivers and the fish stay sufficient to support a growing population of these fish eagles.

The predictions for Elsa are becoming more worrisome. Each change in the model sees it bearing down more heavily along that Southwest coast of Florida including Fort Myers up to St Petersburg. Please send any warm wishes you have that the system pulls more to the West as it heads towards Florida after Cuba.

Thank you for joining me today. Stay safe wherever you are and thank you to everyone who writes to me. I do try and get to answer your letters as quickly as I can and please know that I appreciate them. I learn something new every day from you! And thank you to all of you for simply loving the birds and doing what you can to make their lives better.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I grab my screen shots: Fortis Exshaw, Fortis Alberta, and the Cumbria Wildlife Trust and the Foulshaw Moss Osprey Cam.

Considering Electra

I have been thinking about Electra all day…and have spent several blogs trying to gain some insight into her behaviour on the Cowlitz PUD nest since her last chick died of heat stroke. She has spent more time at the nest today than yesterday when it was deathly hot. She food calls when she sees Wattsworth. She stands like a sentry. She spent the night at the nest.

I have been given examples of raptor behaviour when the eggs have been broken and the female continues in incubation mode because of her hormones. Many of you have also seen other raptors incubating eggs for long periods of time when they are unviable. That is one behaviour. But, I am going to go out on a limb and say that the behaviour displayed by Electra is different.

There are no eggs to hatch. How does an Osprey mourn? While I believe that Electra ‘understood’ the death of the first by siblicide, she returned to find her second chick had died – a chick with a crop and seemingly healthy. This just took me back to the situation on Captiva Bald Eagle Nest on Santibel Island this early spring.

Some of you will remember that traumatic event. Joe had brought a rat to the nest and had fed baby Hope and Peace. Peace died almost before anyone could realize how ill she was. Hope grew and only died when one of her blood feathers broke and she bled out. It was the rodenticide, the rat poison that did not allow her blood to coagulate. The father, Joe stood over the body of Peace in the Captiva Bald Eagle Nest in Santibel, Florida. Joe stayed with his baby until the corpses of both Peace and Hope were removed for autopsy. In the end, Joe was so traumatized by the events on the nest that his role as dominant male was usurped.

Joe is not the only male that has shown a response to trauma. Another good example is Romeo on the NE Florida Nest. When Juliette was injured by an intruding female and did not return, Romeo tried to take care of the nest. When he went to get food for the eaglet the intruder returned and took the chick. Romeo left and never returned to his nest.

What I am saying is that I do not think that we can always put behaviours of the birds down to ‘hormones’ or instincts. What Electra is doing is different than incubating and she is not brooding the chicks. She is standing over them, like Joe at Captiva.

We will never get into the mystery of precisely how Joe or Electra are feeling. My thoughts on this behaviour are simply my own observations based on deaths at other nests. I do not know how Electra has responded to the death of her chicks in the past and if this current behaviour is any different.

Other females have lost Osprey chicks and left the nest completely not to return. Landa did not, as I recall, return to the Urdaibai Biosphere Park in Spain after her last two chicks died of hypothermia this year. Others like Mrs G moved her dead chicks to the edge of the nest and she now spends time eating fish and being on the nest with Aran. Mrs G and Aran also accepted the community fish and those were brought to the nest. At other times an only chick dies and the mother has to continue to care for other little ones.

The response to tragedy is not always uniform and predicted.

Tiny Tot has had to deal with an intruder today. Jack owes Tiny lots of fish! There is also concern as Tropical Storm moves from the Caribbean to Florida early nest week. It should be dissipated enough to only cause 34 mph winds. I will keep you posted.

I want to close with leaving you something beautiful to watch. You might never have seen it before. It is a sight not seen in Poole Harbour, England for 200 years. Imagine. 200 Years. It is an Osprey doing a sky dance. This is two year old male 022 trying to impress CJ7. They will not raise a family until next year but 022 is extremely earnest in his desire to bond with CJ7 at the Poole Harbour Nest!

Thank you for joining me today. Take care everyone.

Thank you to the COWLITZ PUD for their streaming cam where I grabbed my screen shots of Electra and the chicks.

Nest Round Up: Wednesday, 30 June

The heat has not dissipated in British Columbia. It was 51 degrees C in Osoyoos. The Town has turned off the Osprey cam. All three chicks died from heat and it is hoped that the mother is now taking care of herself and rebuilding her strength. The pavement is boiling and you could, literally, fry an egg on it. It is hot on the Canadian Prairies but nothing coming close to 51 C. It is 31 C. Once, many years ago, my son and a high school mate of his and I were in Delhi, India. It was 46 C. You could hardly breathe. It was the monsoon and it was raining and the heat combined with the humidity was unbearable. We headed for the mountains and monkeys in Simla. 51 C is, of course, not typical for Canada in the summer! Not only have our beloved osprey chicks died but also many humans.

I am surrounded by books on my desk, some written two decades ago, warning about heat death. Newer ones like, The Uninhabitable Earth. Life after Warming by David Wallace-Wells, will scare people about what can or is coming. The world did not listen when the warnings came decades ago. Will we listen now? Stopping DDT use is a focused effort. The climate issues are interconnected with everything. It is complicated but needs some really insightful people to figure out how we can really help, if it isn’t too late.

The heat in British Columbia where one of my dearest friends lives is unbearable. Her pottery studio and wood kiln are close to the US border like Osoyoos. I worry for her as the trees get hot, the creeks and the well she depends on gets lower and lower. And, of course, our hearts wrench for the wild life. And then there are the fires.

For now, most of you reading this blog know how to help. Keep your pets cool. Rub an ice cube over them if you have one. Sprinkle them. Maybe skip the long walk and -and of course, keep those precious darlings out of the cars. Leave more water out for the birds. Shallow bowls work! The birds in our garden get many seconds that I have made. But one of their loves are quiche dishes. Don’t ask me why. Maybe they are shallow enough to wade and splash and drink at the same time. The Blue Jay family has been in the bowls almost all day. They have kept me busy running in and out but I don’t mind. The male really likes the little bird sprinkler! Extra treats have been put out too.

I have checked on Electra. She is coming and going on the nest today. Perhaps by Friday, the brooding hormones will be gone. The temperatures have dropped in Washington compared to BC but it is still hot and she needs to get her strength back. Laying eggs, incubating, and trying to feed chicks and yourself when there isn’t enough food will have depleted her reserves. Keep wishing she will find a cool place in the shade and catch fish! Honestly, she cannot count on Wattsworth. What is wrong with him?!

It’s about 2:30 pm and Electra has returned to the Cowlitz Osprey Nest. She stands over her little ones fish crying to Wattsworth. I started thinking about his name. If he were a wattage, it would sure be low. Like a 15 watter instead of a 150 watter. How many of us just want to scream out to Electra to give up on this really dead beat dad. Too many hungry dead babies.

I wanted to check in on some other nests and the first video that came up on YouTube was an old one of Father Stork and the chicks on the Mlady Buky Nest in Czechoslovakia. This is the stork family where the mother was electrocuted. The community came forward to feed the babies and the dad and well, they saved their lives. Lovely, generous people.

This was then:

This is now – these are the babies!!!!!!! Aren’t they just incredibly beautiful? It will not be long until they leave the nest. Father Stork and people of Mlady Buky – you did well! I hope that blessings come to all of you.

Speaking of storks. My son has travelled to Spain from the Caribbean and he sent me images of storks on the old railway station in Caspe. The Ebro River is full of fish including the gigantic Wells Catfish. He tells me that there are storks everywhere along this beautiful river below. He did see a couple of Osprey.

“Sunset in Ebro river / Capvespre a l’Ebre” by Sebastià Giralt is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Just look at that one nest on the far left – it is huge! That nest is really incredible.

The camera on the Black Stork Nest at Karula of Karl II and Kaia has been down since there has been a big thunderstorm. I cannot show you an image of the storklets. They are 31 days old today. From the forum in Estonia it appears that everything is OK. Karl II has brought in food five times and Kaia twice. If there is an error in the transmission system, then the camera will come back on line but if the problem is with the hardware, then it will wait. The fear of staring the storklets off the nest before fledge time is simply too great. The average time for the little ones to stay on the nest is 65 to 73 days so we are not yet at the halfway mark.

Tiny Little Bob on the Foulshaw Moss Nest of White YW and Blue 35 is continuing to try and make nest improvements. This afternoon she spent quite a bit of time working, sometimes upsetting Middle Bob, the male, while he was trying to sleep. It seemed that the sticks she required were always under him! Great Big Bob, also a female, prefers to exercise her wings!

Tiny Little is on the far left in the top image. She has been trying to get a stick from under Middle Bob, the male, with no luck.

It is a little warm here. Tiny Little is doing some panting to keep cool. Nothing like North American though.

Great Big Nasty Bob, the other female, is on the far right doing her wing exercises. I sure wish I could get Tiny Little and Great Big Nasty standing up next to one another so you could see the size difference! We all got fooled. Tiny Little is a girl too. In that image you would see a female at the top end of the growth scale and the other at the bottom. However, we are no longer worried about Tiny Little. She has a crop today and will fledge, maybe just a little later, like Tiny Tot at Achieva. I still like to check in on her every day to see how she is doing.

If you would like to watch this Trio while they get ready to hover, here is the link to the Cumbrian Wildlife Trust Osprey Cam. There is no rewind function. Click on the square at the right top to enlarge the image.

https://www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk/wildlife/cams/osprey-cam

Beautiful Tiny Tot has been on and off the Achieva Osprey Nest. As far as I know there have been no fish today but, of course, Tiny has been eating several large fish for the past couple of days, she is OK. My phone tells me that it is raining in St Petersburg, Florida is 29 C. That is hot! Not in comparison to the Pacific Northwest but the fish could be going down deeper and might not be caught til later in the day.

Tiny in the late morning waiting for fish delivery before the rains hit. Seems she will be waiting til it cools down maybe. We love you Tiny!

It is 5:21 nest time. The rain has come and gone and Tiny Tot is calling Jack wanting her fish! She is persistent and I am sure Jack will turn up with a nice one for her before dark – or maybe even after like the other day.

At the Osprey Nest in the Clywedog Reservoir in the Hafren Forest in Wales, Seren is feeding Only Bob – great Big Boy Bob – his late dinner. (20:50). Look at the size of that Osprey chick. Gracious.

The sun is setting and it is just gorgeous landscape. Just one healthy chick. Thanks so much, Dylan! You are a great dad! I often wonder what it would be like if there were only one healthy chick on every nest. Like most of you, I get terribly upset when the third hatches are beaten on and starving – or die.

The Two Bobs at the Loch of the Lowes Osprey Nest are waiting for NC0 and Laddie to come in with a nice big fish for the end of the day. The sun is turning them golden as it starts to fall behind the horizon. Oh, they are so big!

The evening fish came in at the Rutland Water’s Manton Bay Nest of Blue 33 and Maya. The male chick, 095 nabbed it! Won’t be long til fledge. The hovering is really good on this nest. Indeed, it can be a nail biter.

And then he wasn’t paying attention and he lost his dinner to his Sister!!!!!!!! There is no love when a fish dinner is at stake.

Idris is resting on his perch tree after delivering a really nice fish to Telyn and the Two Bobs. Life is good on the Dyfi Nest!

It rained heavy on the Red tail hawk nest of Big Red and Arthur on the Cornell University campus. It started just before 15:30 and lasted about half an hour. It was pouring and there were no Ks on the nest! I will keep an eye out now that the torrents have stopped. Those two will be soaked! Lucky for them they have feathers, layers and layers of feathers, and don’t need a rain jacket or umbrella!

Yesterday afternoon someone posted a short video clip of K1. She is so cute.

And have you ever wondered how much weight a Golden Eagle might carry? Eagles are opportunistic hunters. If they see something edible, they will not leave it. In this case it was a fox that was carrion (already dead). And this happened in really heavy winds in a storm:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1427226434164178/permalink/3091832501036888/

Wishing for fish for Tiny Tot and any of the other hungry babies out there. Also wishing for an Arctic Cold front to come pouring through for the folks in the extreme heat area.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Stay well, stay safe. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I get my screen shots: Mlady Buky White Stork Cam, Cowlitz PUD, Cumbrian Wildlife Trust and Foulshaw Moss Osprey Cam, Achieva Credit Union, Clywedog Osprey Nest and Carnyx Wild, Scottish Wildlife Trust and Friends of the Loch of the Lows, LRWT and Rutland Water Manton Bay Osprey Nest, Dyfi Osprey Nest, and Cornell Bird Lab and RTH Cam.

Credit for Feature Image to Cris Martin. Storks on old Rail Station in Caspe, Spain. 30 June 2021.