Monday morning in Bird World

25 July 2022

Oh, good morning everyone! Still some fledging going on in the UK, osplets getting their ‘legs’ in the US, another video of Little Bit…it is starting off as a good week. Fingers and toes crossed.

At the Sea Eagles nest in the old Ironbark Tree, Lady seems to have gotten into a pattern of feeding SE 29 and 30 every hour. Lady’s job at this stage of the eaglet’s development is to brood and feed the chicks. Dad is in charge of hunting and guarding the nest. The chicks will grow quickly. When they are 3-4 weeks old, Lady will stop brooding them at night and sleep perched on the tree. Fledging takes place between 75-85 days, normally.

So,, we must enjoy every moment of these two little white snow balls. What can we expect in weeks 2 and 3? You will continue to notice how their beaks are growing longer. It is hard to imagine but they will start to crawl out of the nest cup during week 2. You will also notice they have started to squirt their ‘ps’ over the side of the nest. No potty training for these two – it is instinctual. By week 3 they will be double their size at hatch and they will become interested in things around them. They will be eating bigger flakes of fish and pieces of prey and, of course, they will have mastered getting those bites into their beak from Lady much better than in the early days.

It is the most beautiful golden morning in Finland at the Janakkalan Osprey nest. The two chicks are sound asleep.

It is an equally beautiful morning in Mlade Buky, The Czech Republic as the sun comes over the distant hills. You can see the four storklets on the natal nest in the foreground. Now look carefully at the top image. In the middle ground, there is the finished ‘home’ that Bukacek was building for him and Betty. The storklets can flap all they want — and they are beginning to work those wings. It would be a little crowded there with six on that nest!

Sorry. It is so dark there but look carefully and you will see the adults in their own private space!

All four storklets at the nest of Karl II and Kaia in the Karula National Forest in Estonia are doing splendid. Like the White Storks above, these four are starting to work their wings as well.

There were only 2 feedings for the storklets on 24 July. From the discussion forum, it appears that the fish baskets need filling or some other bird species is eating them. It also appears that there is not enough fish in the natural sources… let us all hope that the baskets are filled and Karl II and Kaia find all that food and eat themselves and feed their four very large storklets.

The three fledglings of Ivo and Iiris are doing well although some of their take offs and landings need a little adjustment. Ivo is delivering really nice size fish to the nest and each waits their turn for another delivery if they missed an earlier one. The nest is located in Southern Estonia near Tartumaa. Nearby is a fish farm as well as a river and some ponds. It would appear from the deliveries that there is plenty of fish for this family of 5.

Ivo has enjoyed the head of this fish. He has a very nice crop. Thanks, Dad.

Another video of the area of the Notre-Dame Eagles – and a most welcome one. It shows where they are and where you can ‘view’ them without doing harm. The individual filming will point the camera to the trees. Squint – look hard. There is at least one fledgling on a branch. They say it is ND17! I sure hope so. It was great to see the three yesterday for the simple reason that 17 is eating somewhere…and flying around watching and learning from the parents …or there would not have been three. So very grateful. Thank you!

Carol Mandis-Beatle posted some images of the three ND eaglets on FB. I hope she does not mind if I share one of them. They were so cute..and they grow so fast!

Speaking of ‘baby pictures’. How many of you remember J3? He falls right up there with L4 for me — cutie pies – Big Red and Arthur’s kids at Cornell. Gosh, I would love to know the dispersal area of their eyases and would especially like to know how they are. You get attached and poof – gone.

J2 and J3 (J1 will be killed flying into the glass at the Weil Building) were best mates. They soared in the sky protecting their sister J1 when she was bathing in a puddle. They also soared together until one morning…J3 got into a thermal, soared high and was gone- out of sight forever. Then J2.

The pressure on BC Hydro to do something to help the Bald Eagles continues – and I am so glad that it is not losing traction. Two articles – one in the Times Colonist and the other in the Vancouver Sun.

https://www.timescolonist.com/local-news/eaglet-from-blended-raptor-family-dies-from-electrocution-5618079?fbclid=IwAR1rliqQwaRn6rVhdPyYF0mpEMqg8fRzL5Dr0K1PNQpqYbmmqzIOCbsiyQk

Malala has been coming and going from the nest. To check out her images please go to GROWLS FB page. You do not have to be a member of FB or their group to see the images.

‘H’ caught the trio at the Boathouse ‘Waddling’ this morning and made a YouTube clip. It is short and ever so cute…all are standing. Thank you ‘H’. That nest is getting rather small…

https://youtube.com/clip/UgkxtoqfzEvKNx_o0JQzGRwo4EMvhHpGn5WQ

In Poole Harbour, there was a moment when the nest was empty. Both chicks of CJ7 and Blue 022 have fledged!!!!!!!! 5H2 fledged this morning. Celebration Time. Like all others, they will, of course, chase the parents back and forth for food for a bit building up their flying skills. Hopefully we will have a few more weeks with the family before CJ7 heads south for her winter break.

5H2 has returned to claim a fish on the nest. What a lovely sight she is. Always good to see them return the first few times! Congratulations to everyone at Poole Harbour.

Skipping way across the pond, the sun made the nest golden at Osoyoos this morning. The chicks were beautiful! Olsen brought in a small fish at 07:16, the first of the day unless I missed something quite a bit earlier.

Alden has found a new loafing spot. He may have to change often if those two fledglings – and Grinnell, Jr in particular – continue to find him. It seems that all the nooks and corners of the Campanile at Berkeley are being visited by Lindsay and Grinnell Jr looking for Mum or Dad or both! Not much peace and quiet…it is beautiful, isn’t it?

Can you spot Alden?

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. It is hazy here this morning The garden birds have been awake for ever so long. The Crows have been at the bird bath cawing their heads off for more peanuts. They was them…and leave the shells in the water for their human servants to clean up! It is so funny to watch. I will try and catch some images for you today. Take care everyone. I hope that your start to the week is a good one. Hoping that we get another update on Victor’s progress soon!!!!

Thank you to the following for their FB posts, videos, and streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Cal Falcons, Osoyoos Ospreys, Poole Harbour Ospreys, GROWLS, Cornell Bird Lab RTH Cam, ND-LEEF, Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender, Mlade Buky, Finnish Osprey Foundation, and Sydney Sea-eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre, Sydney Olympic Park.

Late Monday and early Tuesday in Bird World

4-5 July 2022

Good Morning Everyone. It isn’t raining!!! The weather forecast was entirely wrong (so far). The sun is shining bright and it looks like it is going to be a fantastic day on the Canadian Prairies.

I mention Daisy the Duck quite often. It was Daisy that got me into loving ducks — despite the fact that I had a pet duck as a toddler – as an adult. She tried so hard – against the odds of a forest full of Crows and Ravens – to raise those little ones. I think it is why I am always out checking on the ducks at our local parks. But, today, I found a very interesting streaming cam and I thought I would share it with you. A female Wood Duck (oh, those females are so cute and sweet) has taken over an owl box and is sitting on eggs! Here is the link:

Fireworks. No one will ever invite me to their party! When we had our Canada Day celebrations there were fireworks set off 3 blocks away from the Peregrine Falcon scrape. I was equally upset and vocal locally – my comments could apply to any City.

Tonight, ‘B’ sent me a note about the fireworks and poor Takoda. 45 minutes later, they are still going off but are closer to the nest in the National Arboretum. Takoda is not the only wildlife impacted – every bird, every animal, every pet – and even humans – could have their hearing and/or breathing compromised. Tonight, I am ‘Miss Stick in the Mud’. At the same time I also wonder how much these big displays cost and how those funds could be used elsewhere. The US Government Accountability Office said that the display cost 19 million in 2019. Wow.

These are not silent fireworks either…just in case you were wondering. No, as ‘B’ said – it sounded like a battle zone. They started at 2109 on either side of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool and I still have screen captures near to 2200.

Someone may ask you ‘What is the importance of Raptors or Birds of Prey anyway?’ In 2013, the British Columbia government did a study on raptors titled, Guidelines for Raptor Conservation in Urban and Rural Land Development. Section 4.2 lists the benefits that raptors have for all of us – not just the residents of British Columbia. Indeed, there is a lot of wisdom in these 151 pages. Do look at section 4.2. It is quite interesting and not so long.

Checking in on the Black Stork intervention by Urmas, Kaia was caught on the camera finding the fish basket today. She returned and fed the four storklets who are growing and growing. Bonus appears to be fully integrated into the family.

You are doing great, Kaia. Look at those beautiful babies with those gorgeous black feathers. Just imagine. These four will take to the skies and fly all the way to the centre of Africa – and hopefully, return to Estonia.

The two chicks of Mr and Mrs AX6 at Llyn Brenig were ringed yesterday. One is showing off its new bling. Were we not just worried about these two in the cold rain last week and they were so tiny? Ringers think it is one female and one male. That gives the Welsh Osprey nests 6 females and 5 males so far.

Idris and Telyn have three big girls to feed and get off the ground. Some of the running jokes is that they are too heavy to fly! Pedran, Padarn, and Paith will do just fine. They will return in two years time looking for a Scottish mate, perhaps, or maybe they will check out any Rutland males that are about.

Aran and Mrs G have been keeping close watch over their territory today as it appears there are intruders about.

All of the nests seem to be doing very well. Dylan has brought a fish in and the three Bobs at Llyn Clywedog are being fed by Seren. It is a good way to keep one of them from taking over the fish – at least at the moment.

It looks like Blue NC0 has a nice crop – she looks so tiny compared to the two big chicks. So grateful that everything is going well on this nest after losing Little Bob. Should be two successful fledges soon.

Does everyone know Iris? the oldest Osprey in the world? She is, I believe 29 years old this year. Her nest is in Missoula, Montana and just look at that nest. Iris no longer has chicks. Her partner, Louis, since her devoted mate Stanley did not return, also has another nest in the baseball park with Star. Louis takes care of Star and her chicks. Every year Iris lays eggs and because one parent can’t do it all, the Crows or Ravens get them. Iris then spends the summer fishing, working on the nest, and taking care of herself. With the toll that chick raising takes on the female, this could be part of the secret to Iris’s longevity.

This morning Louis joined her early to keep intruders at bay but what interested me the most was how much work Iris has done on her nest. Just look at the amount of twigs! I wonder if Dr Green is going to gather up twigs from under the nest and have pens made as a fundraiser? The two I purchased from last year are beautiful and you can easily buy refills which makes them very sustainable.

Iris is a great fisher. Just look how strong she is. She has been working on this nest every day and it is so nice because we get to see her!

There is a lot of new nesting material arriving on the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest in Delaware. The kids were hoping for a nice big fish but it looks like new straw. Is Mum going to weave a basket?

I was interested in this image because of the dark bands on the tail. For Red-tail Hawks, you check to make sure that there are 5 dark bands. It is a simple trick to see if the chicks are near fledging. It seems to also apply to Osprey. These two are getting very close to being able to fly. Whether or not they will want to is another story.

At the Boathouse Osprey platform on Hog Island, everyone seems very happy with the morning feeding. Dory did a crack up job making sure all three were absolutely full – including Little Bob.

‘H’ sent a screen capture – so happy that the wee one had a bit of a private feeding filling up its crop. Yeah for Dory our first time Mum. Thanks so much for this great image, ‘H’. — Look at those little fat bottoms.

At the Osoyoos Osprey nest, it looks a little drier this morning. The kids have already had a small fish for their breakfast and are cuddled under Mum.

I don’t remember a pair of Cal Falcon fledglings that have loved to spend so much time together. It is such a delight to see Lindsay and Grinnell Jr play together – and what a welcome to relief to catch them on the camera of The Campanile.

Thank you so much for joining me today. Everything ‘appears’ to be quite fine in the nests that we have been watching. Fingers all crossed and toes, too, that it stays that way. Take care everyone — stay safe.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: NADC-AEF, Eagle Club of Estonia and Looduskalender Forum, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Dyfi Osprey Project, CarnyXWild, Friends of the Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Montana Osprey Project and Cornell, Mispillion Osprey Project, Audubon, Osoyoos Ospreys, and Cal Falcons.

Friday in Bird World – brief notes

1 July 2022

What a busy day in Bird World and sadly, another entry on ‘that list’.

I want to start by thanking one of our readers, ‘AM’. She left her home and pushed through all kinds of Canada Celebrations and a parade for an hour to get to the Osoyoos Osprey Nest the minute she learned of the chick’s fall. Sadly, the little one did not survive. ‘AM’ found a quiet restful place for him near the nest. Thank you ‘AM’. I also want to add that she went prepared with all the things needed to drive him to a rehabber – gloves, towels, a box, etc. Fantastic.

It is always tragic to find a wee one dead or badly injured. It was a big fall and unlike goslings or ducklings, osplets just don’t have the bounce. Sadly, we cannot stop the ospreys from bringing material to the nest but, we can urge farmers to use best practices and different baling materials. Dr Ericke Green at Montana Raptors (Iris) has been studying this problem for a long time and has found a different material for baling that is less problematic for the Ospreys — if farmers would only use it.

I am very thrilled to see all of the donations and thank you’s to Humane Wildlife Indiana. For all of you that pushed the staff at St Patrick’s Park to get help – through your e-mails, phone calls, and in chat, thank you. It takes an army of people to get help and you are a great army.

If you want to send a direct thank you to Delilah Ruiz, here is the e-mail: druiz@humaneindiana.org

Our beautiful Little Bit in care, thankfully. Tears.

There is, however, some really super news in Bird World. It comes from Cal Falcons. Annie and Alden were doing a courtship ritual in the scrape box. Alden proved himself to us over and over again as being very capable of taking good care of Annie and any chicks but – Annie had to really make that decision. Alden passed – and Annie and Alden are a couple. Yes.

Alden figured out how to overcome a physical limitation and he now has Annie and the best territory in San Francisco. I hope that their lives together are long and productive.

Looks like we are going to see the chicks doing a lot of moth chasing and loafing just like Lindsay did today! Isn’t she gorgeous? Look at those eyes and those feathers. I hope that we see Little Bit 17 get his feathers into good condition now that he has regular food.

You know. Human animals should watch some bird cams before they have children so they learn that everything one does makes an impression on children.

Other good news is coming out of Cornell. Here is today’s update on L3 who was taken into care a week ago.

“We received a brief update from the Wildlife Hospital today, reaffirming that L3 continues to do very well. The veterinarians will be performing additional radiographs in another 1-2 weeks to check up on the fractured coracoid bone, at which point they should be able to better predict a future timeline for continued healing and rehabilitation. They also shared that, based on body weight, L3 is likely a female. We will plan to post another update following the next set of radiographs — thanks for sharing all of your concerns about L3’s continued healing!” Thank you ‘SAH’ for seeing that L3 was found and was in care quickly.

Dylan has just brought in the last fish for the day to Seren and the three Bobs.

The three at Llyn Clywedog have been ringed. They are 553 a big female weighing 1710 grams at 40 days, 554 a male weighing 1485 at 40 days and 555 another male weighing 1410 at 37 days old.

The parents lose weight when they are busy raising chicks. Just look at how small Maya looks compared to the three big gals that her and Blue 33 have been feeding. Maya lost about 33% of her body weight taking the great care she did of her chicks.

Idris brought in another whopper to the Dyfi nest despite the rainy weather. Him and Telyn (Maya’s daughter) are feeding three girls, too.

It hasn’t all been rosy with the four Black storklets in the nest of Karl II and Kaia. At first Bonus was hissing at Kaia. That got better. Then the biological storklets were biting Bonus’s legs. Karl II has brought in a meal a few hours ago and things look good. Urmas needs to observe the nest closely so that the biological osplets do not get in a position of not having enough fish due to the size of Bonus.

Fingers crossed that all of this gets worked out. The biological three are looking for more fish and there is Bonus busting his crop.

I intended to include more but a kestrel has a broken wing about an hour and a half away and needs to get to Wildlife Haven – so I am off!

Take care everyone. Thank you for joining me. Donate if you can – even $5 for Little Bit. Every $ helps. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and FB pages: Eagle Club of Estonia, Humane Wildlife Indiana, CarnyXWild, LRWT, Dyfi Osprey Nest, Cornell Bird Lab and Cal Falcons.

Late Monday and early Tuesday in Bird World

27 June 2022

Latest news on Little Bit 17: This was posted by park staff:

10:54am 17 has been spotted on a low branch in the vicinity of the nest tree. Appears vigorous and healthy. As soon as searchers spotted him, he raised his wings & hissed. Searchers immediately left. 5:38 PMLJ ​We are celebrating!🥳🥳🥳

I am going to toss my 25 cents worth in here. Eagles hiss and go into a protective posture when they are banded. They hiss to keep humans and other animals away. We can definitely celebrate that 17 survived the night. That is fantastic. Still, it remains that Little Bit 17 needs to be observed and/or taken into care by a qualified rehabber. Eagles never show fear or pain. Everyone is right to leave him be. Chasing him would could cause a fatality. In comparison to the RTH chick that was force fledged off the Eagle nest in Gabriola, it was able to climb back up to the nest. This morning 15 and 16 are on the nest, there is no room for Little Bit and there is no indication that he is able to ‘climb’ or scratch his way up to the nest. Someone needs to be at a distance observing closely his movements and if the parents feed him. And, yes, did I say it ten times? A wildlife rehabber needs to come in and do a thorough check. They are the only individuals that can expertly assess his needs.

I don’t know about anyone else but it sure is hard waiting until tomorrow morning to find out if Little Bit 17 survived the night. If you are coming in late or catching up reading the blogs, Little Bit fell off the ND-LEEF nest at 15:45:12. The circumstances are confusing. Suffice it to say that ND16 had returned to the nest today and it was crowded with all three birds. 16 had pecked Little Bit and, perhaps in reaction to that, Little Bit wanted away from 16 and well, he fell. Whether or not 16 helped with that fall off the nest will be debated for eons. What matters most is that staff from St Patrick’s County Park in South Bend, Indiana were there immediately giving updates. One wildlife rehabber has Covid (from Elkart) and the second was out of office on Monday. I understand they have been notified and will help tomorrow, if necessary. Since Little Bit 17 is on the ground under the nest tree there is some concern about predators such as coyotes. Many of us hope that there are volunteers watching through the night so no harm comes. It is unclear if Little Bit 17 has any injuries. Will the parents entice Little Bit with prey and get it to fly? Can Little Bit fly or are there wing issues? We simply have to wait and waiting is hard! Because of the deterioration of the nest, it would simply be unwise to place him back on the nest. It could completely collapse at any time. Thankfully both 15 and 16 are both flying reasonably well. So….until tomorrow!

There is another fledgling eagle being closely watched by Dr Sharpe of the Institute for Wildlife Studies. This is Sky at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta. Dr Sharpe said, ” I’m aware that Sky seems to have an issue breathing, but it is not feasible to capture a free-flying eagle in the terrain around the nest. The stress to the bird in association with chasing it around for hours could also be fatal.” 

Do you know much about the history of falconry? My friend Wicky sent me this article that showed up in The New York Times. It is quite an interesting read.

The two chicks of Laddie LM12 and Blue NC0 were ringed on the evening of 27 June. This was the announcement from LOTL:

Loch of the Lowes reports that the Blue Darvic rings are LP8 (oldest) and LR0 (youngest) on the lower left leg identifying them as being Scottish birds. They could not determine gender – said it was too close to call or either small females or large males.

Everyone had a large trout compliments of Laddie at 0530 Tuesday morning.

The three at the Foulshaw Moss nest in the Lake District (Cumbria) in the UK were ringed yesterday. The streaming cam was off for most of the day. Here is a photo of the trio with one of the three showing their bling. No other information. Mary says that they will release information at the end of the week. Blue Darvic Rings on the lower right hand to indicate an English bird. Scotland puts them on the lower left. Numbers are 479, 480, and 481.

The close of the day at the Mispillion Harbour Osprey nest was really soggy. Kids are sleeping adult style instead of duckling!

They are having a lovely Tuesday at the Mispillion Harbour nest – thank goodness. Gosh they were so soggy on Monday. Nice.

It looks like wind is hitting the Dyfi nest of Idris and Telyn during Tuesday afternoon. The weather radar indicates that more rain is coming but it might just clip the area of the nest. No word that any ringing was done today for the chicks here at Dyfi.

It is extremely windy at Glaslyn and from the drops on the camera it has either been raining or is continuing to be wet. How miserable for Mrs G and the kids. The strong winds and rain were supposed to be gone by 1500 by they certainly are not!

It is wet at Llyn Clywedog as well. Poor Seren and the triplets. Soaked to the bone.

It is blowing and roaring and wet at Llyn Brenig also. Both adults on the nest helping with the two osplets.

Poole Harbour seems to be the place for beautiful skies, calm winds and no rain. Both CJ7 and Blue 022 were on the nest with their two osplets this afternoon. That is certainly a deep nest. We have only been able to see the tops of their heads but look how big now. Wow. There is a lot of change between those wee little babes and a 27 and 25 day old osplet. These hatched on 1 and 3 June. the other egg was non-viable. Just lovely.

Yesterday I mentioned the idea of an intervention. The head of the Estonian Medical University’s Vet Clinic, Dr Madis V and Urmas, the main Ornithologist in Estonia, believed that there was a chance to save the lives of the three surviving storklets of Jan and Janika. They removed the three off the nest and took them to the veterinary clinic where they devised as best they could with the resources they had an environment where they would not imprint on humans. They would also hear the sounds of the forest and be fed in a way as if they were on the nest. The three storklets of Jan and Janika continue to do well in care.

Skipping across the pond to North America, the three osplets at the Hog Island nest of Dory and Skiff are doing fantastic. First time Mum has figured out feeding and the three had a great breakfast. Skiff had the fish on the perch and was eating the head – the portion eaten by the males before giving it to the females. This ensures that the male gets fed too! He has to be in good shape to fish. You will also see whole fish brought to the nest and sometimes they are still alive and cause mischief or serious mishaps.

The Boathouse kids did do some beaking this morning. This should go away. There is plenty of food! When small they are struggling keeping their heads up and their eyes focused. Of course, we all know that this seemingly innocent playing is also part of a dominance strategy and can, in extreme cases, lead to serious issues on the nest. We should keep an eye on this behaviour.

The two fledglings at Cal Falcons are incredible. They are doing the cutest things and often appear to be together. From chasing moths like Alden showed them to playing tag, they are learning what it is like off the nest. ‘B’ noted that the moth catching was a great way to improve eye-talon co-ordination and he is absolutely spot on! Who would have thought? Alden turns out to be an amazing role model including his loafing on the ledge.

And here is the loafing by Lindsay!

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. We will wait to see the status of Little Bit 17 and Sky. Waiting is very difficult – maybe weeding my garden will help! But there is also a garden announcement. We were happy to discover and observe Little Red in his new home and to see the two baby squirrels. Last evening Junior (you will remember that Junior came to the garden with his parents for several years but the parents did not return this spring) brought 3 fledgling little Blue Jays to the garden to feed. They were so well behaved waiting on the cable line til they were told to move.

I could not believe how well behaved they were.

You get whiffs of the peonies all over the garden. They are so lovely and were planted in 1902 when the old house on this property was here – along with the climbing roses. They have survived nicely, thankfully.

Thank you so much for joining me today. I am elated that Little Bit 17 survived the night. He has no nest to go to. Did parents feed him? That would need to be directly observed. How are his movements? going from one spot to another? Needs an expert to really assess. I hope that he is 100%. We all do. It is so much better if the birds are raised by their parents when possible. Take care everyone. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: Arlene Beech, Explore.org and Audubon, Cal Falcons, Liz M and the EMU, Poole Harbour Ospreys, Llyn Brenig Ospreys, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, CarnyXWild, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery and the Woodland Trust, Dyfi Osprey Project, Mispillion Harbour Ospreys, Cumbrian Wildlife Trust and Friends of the Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust.

Late Saturday in Bird World

4 June 2022

It was a fantastic day on the Canadian prairies. Clear blue sky. Sun shining bright and everyone happy – even smiling and saying ‘hi’ on the trails. Sadly, the birds thought it was beautiful too and they must have all gone sight-seeing! There were some American White Pelicans – 7 to be exact – hanging out with 9 Double-Breasted Cormorant. A female Hooded Merganser. A family of Canada Geese! And many Red-wing Blackbirds protecting territories where there were obvious nests. It was still nice to be outside with the sun beating down even if there had been not a single bird in sight.

There were two females on nests and these three goslings with their parents. This place should be crawling with goslings – everywhere. The flood really did a lot of harm.

The Redwing Blackbirds appear to have sentinels that stand watch or follow humans trying to lure us to one spot or another away from the nests.

There has not been a lot of time to check on all the nests. I wanted to see if Little Bit 17 had any food. He had an entire fish to himself yesterday but he needs food every day! It won’t always get it, sadly. Not on this nest. At 19:02:47 a Bluegill at 19:02:47. Everyone sort of looked at Dad and the fish. Then at 19:04:57 Little Bit stole it! I cannot tell you if he got any fish to eat but he worked on it until 16 – the one who beaks him – stole it from him. Then 15 took it and Little Bit moved over by the porch and did the snatch and grab and got some fish. There could be another delivery later.

It is not a huge fish.

Little Bit was quick! And he took advantage of a good situation. It is too bad that Dad didn’t just block the other two!

16 has the fish and 15 is going to get it away. Little Bit is at the top left watching and listening. Little Bit knows if 15 gets the fish he will get some food.

There is a scab forming over the bad peck that 16 gave Little Bit the other day.

Little Bit is by the tree snatching and grabbing bites from 15 as 16 watches.

At 17:37 Little Bit gets the fish head and moves with it to the top railing where he feeds off it until 17:50! Well done Little Bit 17! You will clean that head of every bit of fish flake like no one else. So happy.

Janika has been regularly feeding the storklets. The last feeding was at 22:54:10. The four have eaten well today. I thought maybe she would stay with them during the night but she is off hunting for food. Urmas has not removed any of the chicks. Perhaps Janika can make this work! I hope so. I wish she would find the fish basket provided for her.

The last two eggs hatched for White Storks Bukacek and Betty at their Mlade Buky nest in The Czech Republic. I cannot help but think that the two smallest will become brood eliminations but, maybe not. That is a lot of mouths to feed.

At the Cal Falcons scrape, Annie and Alden have done the most amazing job raising these two eyases. They are huge – full of energy and life and absolutely healthy. We will be forever grateful that the Avian Flu did not manifest itself in the West so that these two can take flight. Their names could not be more perfect – Lindsay and Grinnell Jr.

Meals happen outside of the scrape now and the chicks run up and down flapping their huge wings. Seriously – look at that wing!

These two have great fun playing with one another. Have a look:

There is something so stunning about the plumage of juvenile Ospreys – the patterning, the beautiful black and white. I do think they are much more gorgeous than the adults. Don’t tell them! Middle has been working his wings since Big fledged.

These two have eaten well. Mum and Dad really filled them up yesterday after getting Big back on the nest for breakfast. And it is nice that the heavy rains forecast for Gainesville as part of the Tropical Storm did not materialize.

The five falcons at the Manchester NH scrape have almost lost all of their baby down. It is really something when food comes to the scrape. All are fed but oh, my what mayhem!

Aran and Mrs G are doing fine with the osplets. It is a wonderful streaming cam because you can hear rural Wales – the sheep bleating and the cows mooing. It is quite lovely if you live in a city like I do.

Despite the strong winds at the Dyfi nest, Idris and Telyn are keeping the osplets nicely fed and hunkered down. Bobbi Bach has really eaten well. He hatched on the 28th of May and is a week old today. Happy Week Birthday!

Poor Telyn. The wind has done a mess of her feathers.

When the third egg hatched at the Loch of the Lowes, I held my breath. It took Blue NC0 a few days to get it together to feed three. Now just look at them. Unbelievable. Lots of fish and this is what happens – fluffy little Osprey chicks with their soft grey down turn into Reptiles. Little Bob is not having any trouble. There he is in the middle of the pack at Mum’s beak.

All over England they are celebrating the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee but in Poole Harbour everyone continues to be delighted in the first three – yes, the third hatched – ospreys to hatch in Poole Harbour in more than 200 years!

In fact, of the birds translocated from Scotland to Poole Harbour over the course of a couple of years, three are now breeding. It has been an enormous success and a shout out should go to Roy Dennis Wildlife for his steadfast belief that you could re-introduce birds to a location by using hatches from another area (Scotland in this case).

You can read all about CJ7 and Blue 022 on Roy Dennis’s website here:

https://www.roydennis.org/category/latest-news/

Roy Dennis writes extensively about this project in his book, Restoring the Wild.

Big Red took a break from parenting to sit on the lights in the sun today. It is quite crowded on that nest now!

The light was not so good to see the eyases but it was good to show the dark bands on the chick in front of the light box. There are five clear dark bands on that chick. From the length of that tail in comparison to the bird to its right, it has to be L1. I would suspect that there are actually 6 clear bands. She is ready to fledge!

What a year it has been for Big Red and Arthur with four eyases on the nest! Even at 19 Big Red continues to surprise us and keep us in awe. She is an incredible hawk and hawk Mum!

Thank you for joining me for this quick look at a few nests today. Take care. See you soon.

NOTE: My Sunday report will come in the late evening.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Dyfi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Woodland Trust, Cornell Bird Lab and RTH, ND-LEEF, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, Poole Harbour Ospreys, Cal Falcons, Peregrine Networks, Mlade Buky Stork Cam, and the Eagle Club of Estonia.