Early Thursday in Bird World

4 August 2022

Good Morning Everyone! I was not going to write my newsletter until the end of the day but some of you might wish to know about the banding of the Royal Cam chick. There is a bit of other news as well. Both chicks at the Loch Garten Osprey platform fledged today – so every osprey chick in the UK has now fledged. Fantastic. I am getting notices that the cameras at the SWFlorida Bald Eagle nest of Harriet and M15 and the NEFlorida Bald Eagle nest of Gabby and Samson will go live in two weeks. Wow. Time is speeding by. Those cameras will turn on just about the time we have Osprey and falcon eggs in Australia.

The little fledgling Blue Jay has decided that it is time that I get some more peanuts outside for the three of them! Too funny. These wee ones can be quite loud when they want to be. They are getting their beautiful blue crests. I believe this is the smaller of the three – a little female -. She has that developing crest raised up high because she is excited! They are so cute and so animated.

The NZ DOC rangers will be banding the chicks on Taiaroa Head today. Here is the announcement by Ranger Sharyn Broni posted by Sharon Dunne on the Royal Cam FB page. There is no mention of the time. There will be an archived video of the banding of QT if you miss it!

I know many of you are anxious to also find out about the naming of QT. They may mention how this will be done this year. On line voting took place during the pandemic but this might change now.

Here is the link to the camera:

An Osprey rescue in Scotland that warms our hearts. You might have to keyboard the URL if it doesn’t give you an automatic link. It is the story of the collapse of the Balgavies Osprey nest mentioned a few weeks ago in my blog – this one has pictures!

scottishwildlifetrust.org.uk

The youngest chick on the Janakkalan Nest has yet to fledge. Titi often remains on the nest now that Boris is flying about for longer periods of time. With intruders and goshawks in the area, it is dangerous for Titi not to be flying.

Boris arrives in the bottom image to protect the nest. Hopefully s/he will take care of its sibling.

This brings me back to the mystery of why a normally wonderful Mum on a Finnish Osprey nest would attack her children. Nuppu on nest #4 attacked her youngest who had not fledged and the eldest who had fledged (much less) last week. Humans wondered how this loving mother could turn on her children. One of my readers ‘L’ suggested that it might have been to get the youngest to fly. Nuppu, knowing that a goshawk was in the area, wanted both of her chicks off the nest and flying free to lessen the threat of predation. I spent some time asking several osprey experts if this could be the case and they said, ‘absolutely’. The youngest did not fly and was predated when the intruder came to the nest. The eldest flew. So, there we are – the mystery of the physical attacks was to get the second chick off the nest and flying. Nuppu wanted to save her chicks, not harm them.

The only surviving fledgling on nest #4.

I do not understand why Titi on the Janakkalan nest has not flown yet. S/he has been doing some exercising of the wings. Hopefully soon!!!!! This is the nest without a female so Boris has taken on the job of security when Dad is not around.

The Sydney Sea Eaglets are doing fantastic. The tips of the wing feathers are beginning to show. You can see them coming in on both chicks – look carefully at the wings.

You will notice that the time between feedings is a little longer. That is because the eaglets can eat much more at a sitting than when they had just hatched and needed a few morsels of fish every 45-60 minutes from dawn to dusk.

SE30 even did a little beaking of 29 yesterday. Nothing major but it was cute when it sat up and gave it a bop.

Both had nice crops! Fish will not be stacked on the nest so much now because it could cause predators to become interested in the nest and the eaglets. They are not big enough yet to be out of danger. They need to be 28-30 days old.

It is raining in Orange and Diamond arrives at the scrape box on the water tower soaking wet! But with a full crop. Looking for eggs in a couple of weeks.

The high temperature for the day will be 23 C at the Osoyoos nest. What a change! A nice fish arrived early on the nest and Soo fed both of the chicks. They made it! Olsen and Soo you should receive a reward – you did fantastic in your strategies to protect the two osplets. Just look at them.

Right now the camera is fairly clear at the Fortis Exshaw Osprey nest in Canmore, Alberta. We can get a good look at those three good looking osplets! We are on fledge watch for this nest. At least two are flapping and starting to hover. It will not be long.

Karl II delivered a number of fishes just a few minutes ago to the four Black storklets in the Karula National Forest in Estonia. So far all is well. The storklets are hovering and jumping and practising their perching to prepare for fledge.

A portrait of the three females at the Loch Arkaig nest this year. From left to right: Willow, Sarafina, and Mum Dorcha (unringed). When we talk about the females having beautiful necklaces have a look at these three! Gorgeous.

I am not sure I have ever seen three females with such elaborate necklaces. Dorcha is really influencing the genetics at this nest. Bravo!

A blast from the past. The four Peregrine Falcon eyases being fed at the CBD-367 Collins Street scrape in Melbourne. Time is ticking away. The camera will be up and running in September. Just in case you forgot how incredibly cute little falcons are!!!!

Thank you for joining me this morning. Things look pretty good in Bird World. Take care. See you soon!!!!!!!!!

Thank you to the following for their posts and their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Friends of Loch Arkaig and the Woodland Trust, Eagle Club of Estonia, Fortis Exshaw, Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre Sydney Olympic Park, Osoyoos Ospreys, Charles Sturt Falcon Cam, Finnish Osprey Foundation, CBD-367 Collins Street Falcon Cam, and Royal Cam Albatross NZ.

Late Thursday in Bird World

30 June 2022

UPDATE ON LITTLE BIT 17: Message from Humane Indiana Wildlife. ” Hello! We will post an update on ND17 tomorrow. Today was stressful for him, as you can imagine, but he is doing well and receiving much needed care.”

I am feeling some comfort in the news that Little Bit ND17 was taken to Valpo to the Humane Indiana Wildlife clinic for a thorough examination and assessment at 11:40 this morning. This is the best news Bird World has had in a couple of weeks. ——–And in the update ‘much needed care’ indicates that getting him to the clinic was the right decision.

I know that the St Patrick’s County Parks staff could never have foreseen the events that would transpire at the ND-LEEF Bald Eagle nest this season. There is an expectation of stability – business as usual – but as many know, we live in very unstable times. And so it was with the nest. The second hatch ND16 took exception to Little Bit’s existence. The aggression, the deterioration of the nest, and then Little Bit’s 60 foot drop to the ground would never have entered the minds of park staff as spring arrived in South Bend, Indiana. But, it did happen. I am grateful that they were able to get Little Bit 17 removed from the bushes and taken to the Valpo clinic. IDNR has stated that not all rehabbers will take birds now because of Avian Flu – so thank you Humane Wildlife Indiana, too.

We wait to hear how our little eaglet is doing tomorrow!


The Dyfi Osprey Project has published all the information on the ringing along with the video of the ringing and weighing and another earlier one of nest aggression attributed to the fact that all three were females. There is a map showing the rivers and a pronunciation guide to the chick’s names after those rivers. It is a good read. Have a look. This is the kind of information that becomes so useful about the nests. Here is that link:

https://www.dyfiospreyproject.com/blog/emyr-mwt/bendigedig-ringing-2022?fbclid=IwAR2OAkzY88lJjf-QaZNhY8Tyvx1AfH_NW6U15ayNz_tvyLlU50BYQhVJdQo

The ringing video is a really good one to watch. They are so careful and the chicks just pancake and stay still. It takes no time. Those colour Darvic rings with their numbers tell us so much information about these amazing birds and their life journeys.

There is also images and information on the ringing of nest 1A at Kielder. This nest had four babies ——yes, I did not get that wrong – 4. I did not mention it but once because I was so afraid that something would happen to little 4. There is a picture of him in there at 1000 grams. His big sister is 50% heavier at 1560. The other two were males. The ringers could not determine the gender of little 4 because he is so small for his age. I hope he proves mighty.

I have been working on and off on a couple of stories about wildlife rehabilitation clinics. They are our go-to when it comes to getting care for our wildlife in need. Each is special in its own way. Some specialize in certain animals and will not take birds. Because of the spread of H5N1 Avian Flu this year, many will not take our feathered friends. So, a bit of a shout out to Valpo for taking Little Bit. They need your support whether it is with your time, volunteering, with a few dollars or a truck load. Every bit is appreciated. Believe it or not, old clean towels are always wanted!!!! So, while we wait to hear about Little Bit 17, I will spend a little time showing you what I did today.

This afternoon was a day to spend at our own rehabilitation clinic. It is the only wildlife clinic in Manitoba with a full time vet, operating room and diagnostic equipment and it is run entirely by donations and volunteers.

Wildlife Haven is not unique. Every facility – those that many of you know by their names – CROW, The Audubon Centre, A Place Called Hope – operate entirely on donations and the generous time offered by volunteers.

I have been working on a blog about 2 other wildlife centres that I will finish up shortly. I was moved to tell you a little bit about our facility because the first thing the Rehabilitation Manager said was, “99% of the injuries to wildlife are human caused.” Everything that we do has the potential to harm the animals that share this planet with us – it can range from kidnapping bunnies from their Mum, to road accidents, taking wildlife in our houses where they imprint on humans, to wind turbines, sticky or glue traps – the list as you know is endless. I am grateful that there is a big campaign to let people know that fishing line is dangerous. It is that time of year when people should be using non-lead fishing tackle, barbless hooks, and helping to clean up the shores as well as taking care of their own area where they fish. I had no idea that so many bunnies arrive at the care facility. Over 900 right now!

Tip regarding rabbits. If you see a brown circle on your lawn and remove the grass covering and see bunnies, do not think that their mother has abandoned them. Take 2 thin sticks and criss-cross them over the top. Go back in 24 hours. If the sticks are moved, the Mum has been in to feed the babies. If the sticks have not been moved, then take the babies to a wildlife rehabber. Put a towel in a box with a lid and holes for air and carefully transport them to the closest facility.

Our centre has been in existence since 1984 but it has only recently been able to have full vet facilities. The amount of rehabilitation work that they are able to do has increased with generous donations for flight and hunting training. That requires trained staff and intense dedication and it is precisely what Little Bit 17 will require. He is missing that by not being with Mum, Dad, 15 and 16. So he is like WBSE28. We want Little Bit kept so that he is able to successfully live in the wild and what I have learned from our local team is that this is a long slow process. It doesn’t happen in weeks. 6 months or more for some birds.

Our wildlife facility, Wildlife Haven, is determined to educate the public through open house days as well as taking the ambassadors to the schools. Start young, teach the children to love and care for the welfare of animals. So every week on Friday they will have what is called a Raptor Rendezvous Day. It was fantastic to see so many people with children at the first event. They also sponsor Open Houses and try hard to let people know how much effort there is in caring for the wildlife patients. From 5 am to 7pm, songbirds are fed every half hour. They constantly need volunteers to do this. The middle of the summer is the most crucial time. Some volunteers are trained in ways to enrich the lives of the raptors that will spend all their lives in the centre. Eagles get bored, too!

So today they introduced three of the ambassadors that help educate the public on how to respect wildlife and what to do if they find an injured animal. They were a Swainsons’ Hawk, a Great Horned Owl, and a Great Gray Owl. The Great Grey Owl is the provincial bird of Manitoba.

This is Avro. He is a light morph Swainson’s Hawk. He was hit by a car. The accident caused him to be blind in his right eye. Losing that one eye meant that Avro is unable to hunt and provide for himself in the wild.

There are lots of Swainson’s Hawks that come to the southern part of our province to breed in the summer. They migrate to Argentina in the winter. Avro is 18 years old now.

Uma is a very small Great Horned Owl. Uma’s nest was in the yard of a family that watched. They noticed that Uma was much smaller than the other owlets and it appeared ‘different’ to the other siblings. It was determined that Uma was under developed due to a lack of food — just like Little Bit 17. Uma was also missing an eye and its beak was out of alignment. Uma would never be able to survive in the wild.

Great Horned Owls are very plentiful and they adapt to all manner of environments from the forests of northern Manitoba to the deserts of Southwest United States and beyond. They have excellent hearing – a kind of shallow disk or satellite-shaped face. The tufts on their heads are neither ears or horns. The ears are on the side of the head, like all raptors, and they are covered with feathers. The tufts are feathers. You can see that Una lost his right eye. He is fed rats every day. He can fly and has a enclosure that is large enough for him to do that. Owls hunt from dawn to dusk and mostly within an hour of each of those times of day. They will hunt during the day time to feed their young, if necessary.

You can see the misalignment of the beak in the image below. Imagine trying to tear into a squirrel with that beak.

This is Zoe with Una. She gave an amazing presentation and answered every question and more.

The last ambassador today was Ash the Great Gray Owl. Ash was orphaned and his rescuers took him home to live with them. As a result he imprinted on humans and not owls. This means that Ash believes she is human, not owl. Despite Ash being in excellent health he will never be able to live in the wild and know what it is like to fly free and hunt.

With its excellent hearing, a Great Gray Owl can detect a mouse under 60 cm or 2 feet of snow. Incredible. In the image below you can see the fur covered legs and talons that help the Great Gray in our cold winters.

It was a great afternoon and came on a day to really think about the important work that these people do.

What can you do? Well you can volunteer or you can donate. Want to do something else? Talk to people about caring for the wildlife on our planet. Let them understand how important it is to get them to care quickly if it is needed. Put on window strips to stop bird strike. Talk to people about putting poison on their lawns. Have that chat about fishing line with people you know and the need for lead free equipment. Take a shovel in your car. When you see road kill, pull over. Of course, be careful but move the road kill off the road and away from it. Vultures, hawks, eagles, and all manner of wildlife will find it and it will be cleared down to the bone within a few hours. Put out bird feeders and water…..lobby for protective wind turbine blades…the list is, sadly, endless. Educate yourself and talk to the experts at your local wildlife clinic.

Several of the streaming cams are set to go offline today. One of those is UFlorida-Gainesville. We will look forward to joining Mum and Dad in the new year! Big and Middle are doing exceptionally well.

Tomorrow is Canada Day. I will be posting a short blog in the morning. I hope that some news of Little Bit will be available. I will also try to check on other nests that we are watching closely including Osoyoos, Boathouse, and FortisExshaw that have wee ones in the nest.

Thank you for joining me. Thank you to everyone who cares for our much loved feather friends and to everyone who worked hard and believed that Little Bit 17 needed to be assessed. It is a bit world out there with many polarizing opinions and intervention is one of those. Take care. See you soon.

Thank you to Dyfi and Kielder for their ringing updates on their blog that I included here today – and to Wildlife Haven for all they do.

Late Wednesday in Bird World

29 June 2022

Everyone that watches the ND-LEEF nest loves Little Bit 17. They also like 15 and 16. Everyone associated with the park where the nest is located is trying to deal with the situation of ND17 as they can. It is best to keep in mind that no one yet – as far as I can determine from the public correspondence on the chat and FB – who has the expertise to determine if 17 is alright has examined him. The operative word is examined – not observed. If I fell 60 feet and pretty much stayed in the same spot and hadn’t moved for 3 days and had not had a good meal for at least 4 days – well, I would hope that they would get medical help not just observe me to be healthy and say it is best to leave me alone.

That is the issue at hand. 17 has not moved from where he was Monday morning and he has not eaten for at least 4 full days. If he was vigorous and lively he would be all over the place not sitting in the same place. He cannot fly. 16 and 15 returned to the nest where the parents wanted them to be to be fed. That nest is falling apart and 17 cannot get up there. Will someone just step back and get a wildlife rehabber – a licensed one – or a volunteer of the rehabbers to pick up 17 and take him to a clinic to be x-rayed and assessed? He can be brought back if he is well. The parents will not abandon him. I pick up wildlife for a clinic and transport the birds (mostly ducks where I have to muck in a pond but often songbirds) to their site as they are busy treating other animals. All clinics have volunteers that do this and we/they are trained in taking great care in picking up and transporting the patients.

Enough. I wish the world was full of individuals like Dr Sharpe and his team at the Institute for Wildlife Studies. Gosh…I bet he would even do a phone consult!!!!!!!!!

The nest continues to deteriorate. Those parents will have it back up and in fine shape for next season once these season’s three have left the territory. It is surprising how fast a nest can be built! I was amazed at how quickly Richmond and Rosie rebuild their nest on the Whirley Crane in the Richmond Shipping Yards even while the Crows kept taking the sticks that they would bring in. Eagles can do that too.

There are holes popping up on the nest everywhere! What is doing that?

I wonder what the ratio of female osprey chicks to male will be in the UK in 2022? They endeavour to get every osprey chick ringed. I am so impressed.

Foulshaw Moss released the information on the banding of the three chicks of White YW and Blue 35 in their blog this morning. One large female – 1.8 kg or 1800 grams (only 30 grams less than the largest ever female at Dyfi) and two males.

https://www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk/news/over-100-osprey-chicks-have-been-tagged-cumbria-2001?fbclid=IwAR2iHrOucTYXV7P1O_1MTveU0uhQpmyn0nzMiWeXaAPINSSVGqJy0YRkC00

In the blog they mention the 100th chick ringed – that was Tiny Tot, Blue 463. So small that no one thought she would survive but with the great care by her Mum and the tricks she played to get Tiny fed (removing the fish on the nest, letting the big ones fall into food coma and returning it to feed Tiny Tot).

Blue 35 feeding Tiny Tot after the two big siblings are fed and going to sleep.

The three chicks on the Glaslyn nest of Aran and Mrs G were ringed today. Mrs G kept guard and she is still watching and waiting for every human to get far away from the nest. Here is the information from the individual that ringed the chicks:

Yesterday the three chicks of Idris and Telyn were ringed at the Dyfi Nest. There are three girls. Their names are after Welsh rivers and lakes. A vote was taken and it was agreed that the names should all use the same first letter. The letter ‘P’ was chosen to honour a long time Dyfi supporter, Posh Pete. The chicks are: Pedran (7B0), weight 1695g. Padarn (7B1), weight 1790g and. Paith (7B2), weight 1830g. Paith sets the record for weight at ringing on this nest but ironically she has the shortest wing span.

Chloe Baker put together this chart to compare.

It is really a good thing that Idris is a good fisher with three large girls to feed plus Telyn and himself!

‘H’ mentioned her frustration at trying to find information on the streaming cam sites. Many have nothing and the FB groups often do not have the history either. I have often addressed the need for an emergency phone number if something happens at the nest but few places will post phone numbers for fear of getting inundated with worrisome calls. Many of the nests are on sites where there is no continuity of staff. I have found, however, that the UK sites have excellent websites. Many – if not all of the nests – are associated with a nature centre that does have dedicated staff and volunteers who try to keep information up to date and accurate.

I want to take this opportunity to give a shout out to the Dyfi Osprey Project – they have all kinds of information under the streaming camera plus a very informative website with a family tree that I have placed on my blog in the past. Here is that information under the streaming cam image:

Out of all that information I am particularly pleased to see Intruder no 7, Blue KCB. This is why information and ringing is important. You can track and establish a history of the birds and their success. Tegid is one of my third hatches of 2020. It was not his sibling that beaked and harassed him but an adult female, Blue 024, an intruder. No one thought he would make it. Well, he did return and this is his third year to have chicks. The fact that he had a chick in his first clutch return as a juvenile at 2 years is fantastic. There is something about this fighting to survive that makes these birds fierce. There is also good DNA. Tegid is Monty’s son and KCB is Monty’s grandson. The dynasty continues.

Do you watch the Theave Osprey nest in the UK? Those chicks were ringed and there is one female, one male, and the other can’t be determined. Nice healthy osplets.

Today is the anniversary of the Osoyoos Osprey nest sadness of 2021 when all chicks died due to the heat wave in the Pacific Northwest. The three this year are doing so well and Olsen has been bringing in some nice big fish. Please send positive blessings to this family that this continues.

It is blowing like crazy in Canmore, Alberta. I wish those three chicks would pancake in that nest but it seems they like it! Mom returns and broods them so all is going to be well.

A reminder now that outdoor picnics are around, parties, weddings, anniversaries and celebrations of all kinds – make the confetti out of leaves (seriously awesome) and leave the balloons out. The raptors will thank you.

Ferris Akel had Arthur and the three Ls on camera tonight and he had seen Big Red but could not get to her. Arthur caught a bird or birds and one of them was delivered to an L. The other two really would have loved that bird delivered to the coop.

Mantling to protect its prey. Look at the tail. How many dark bands can you count? That is a tail that is long enough to help this hawk fly very well, indeed.

Two cutie pies. Big Red and Arthur have the most gorgeous chicks.

The chicks went over to the Fernow railing and they are hunting.

It was a breezy cool day here in Manitoba. Today it was nearly a 5k walk around all the trails and a discovery of a very quiet duck and some growing ducklings.

I took the longer path around the entire nature area and found this beautiful male Blue-winged Teal in a very quiet pond hidden by lots of reeds. These ducks arrive in Manitoba in April and will be migrating south in October. They are here to breed and sadly, it was a bad year because of the flooding for the eggs of the ducks and geese. They eat pondweeds and aquatic invertebrates as well as grass seeds on the top of the water.

American White Pelicans were flying overhead.

The Canada geese and goslings were preening after a nice swim.

It was a lovely day. When I got home Mr Crow was waiting for his tea time snack. Looks like Tandoori Chicken was a big hit.

I see no word on the Pitkin Osplet that fell off with its sibling and was in guarded condition.

Thank you to everyone who wrote in with additions to the memorial list. Please, if you know of birds that are on streaming cams and have perished this year please let me know.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or web pages or FB groups where I took my screen captures: ND-LEEF, Chloe Baker, Cumbrian Wildlife Trust, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Dyfi Osprey Project, Osoyoos Ospreys, Fortis ExShaw, and Ferris Akel Tours.

Late Sunday-early Morning in Bird World

26-27 June 2022

There are people all around the world sending good wishes, saying prayers, lighting candles – wherever their beliefs take them – for Little Bit 17 and his nest. Each of us wants the same thing – for the nest to hold out long enough for ND17 Little Bit to fledge. If it lasts longer and he gets prey drops there from the adults – well, that is the whipped cream and the cherry on top of what has been a very difficult season for this third hatch. It was not very often Little Bit caught a break but he learned skills that ND16 might not still know – and it is those skills that will help Little Bit out in the big world.

I made 3 video clips because watching it happen is so much easier than my narration. An adult lands on the nest with a really nice sized fish at 20:11:38. Little Bit immediately mantles it and then 15 flies down to the nest. It is difficult to imagine having enough room on that nest for all three never mind the dust ups. I thought both might go off the nest wings tangled.

There is a dust up over that fish between 15 and Little Bit 17. In fact, there are a couple. Here is a 30 second clip of one of those.

Little Bit 17 gets his fish! ND15 will fly off the nest. Watch carefully and you will see that 17 gets a nice size portion of fish. He will have sweet eagle dreams tonight.

Nothing was ever easy for Little Bit 17. He continues to be a great inspiration to so many of us. He never gives up, never. If you go to the streaming cam it is at 20:28 that Little Bit gets the fish. At 20:30:54 ND15 leaves the nest.

If you are interested in the growing population of Ospreys in the San Francisco Bay area, Tony Brake gave a Zoom presentation on this very topic this morning. Here is the link to the archived Zoom presentation.

https://fb.watch/dUWIGxeq32/

This is the latest tracking of our favourite Eastern Osprey, Ervie. PLO notes that he still flies by the barge but it appears he understands he is no longer welcome. How sad for Ervie!!!!! Believe me when I say that I hope Ervie stays right in that area and that when Dad and Mum no longer need that barge that he moves right in – just like Samson did at the NEFlorida nest of his parents Romeo and Juliet.

Karl II has been to the nest he shares with his mate, Kaia, in the Karula National Forest in Estonia. He has brought breakfast. Just look at these cubby little storklets – OK, not so little. They have certainly began to do that amazing ritual to get the adults to let go of their fish. Incredibly beautiful.

And a feeding from the step-dad Toru for the three storklets of Jan and Janika who are in care at the Vet Clinic. There was a plan to move them outdoors but it seems that the complicated care that the trio require is difficult to find a place for them. It is the busiest time for the ornithologists as they are not only caring for wildlife but also ringing the birds. It is not clear but perhaps a temporary outdoor area for them can be built at EMU.

It is another wet cool morning in Wales at the Dyfi Nest of Idris and Telyn. Telyn his huddled with her three osplets who would love to be small again so they would fit under Mum and be toasty warm.

Just look at those beautiful amber/orange eyes. Penetrating. When they are adults they will be yellow. (Exceptions apply like Monty who kept his amber eyes).

Mrs G looks like she is not as drippy wet at her Glaslyn Valley nest as Telyn is at Dyfi.

It might be utterly miserable outside but it appears that Dylan is the first of the Welsh males to get a fish on the nest. Seren is busy feeding those big Bobs.

Oh, Dorcha looks a lot drier at her Loch Arkaig nest in Scotland than poor Seren. It is nice to see Dorcha and the nest drying out. She has had a rough time of it this breeding season with the weather – snow, pelting rain, wind – gale force winds – and then losing Little Bob.

Louis brought in lots of fish on Monday for Dorcha and the chicks. Just look at Big Bob’s crop!

Blue NC0 flew in with a fish for the two ever growing and big Bobs. She does not appear to be wet – although she could have dried off before arriving at the nest with the fish. Or she got a hand off from Laddie. At any rate, there is fish on the nest early and that is a great way to start the day at Loch of the Lowes.

Laddie brought in a decent fish early in the morning but has been contending with intruders all day. This is a popular place for Ospreys and sadly NC0 and the chicks are sometimes hungry because of his territorial duties.

The Foulshaw Moss nest is having the chicks ringed today so the camera is off line.

Check on the ND-LEEF nest. The first prey delivery for Little Bit 17 falls off the nest. At 08:17:34 Dad arrives with a possum.

That arrival prompts 15 to fly in and take it away from Little Bit.

All three are on the nest including ND16 who was seen but not on the nest that I know of since fledging. That is good! I have no idea how this nest is holding up with all this activity.

Little Bit 17 gets to spend some time with his buddy 15. Sweet.

Another prey drop just now. It looks like 15 got it but 17 is snuggling up to get some. I don’t think Little Bit 17 got any of that meal unless it was some scraps. He is going to be very hungry today after loosing that first prey item overboard.

ND16 is on the nest at 13:00 with Little Bit. Must be very tired from all that flying and happy to be home.

Cilla Kinross – whose name you might know from Xavier and Diamond’s scrape in Orange, Australia posted a very cute video clip of the three falcons of Eve and Milo at the University of Montreal this morning. The eyases have names – Red ring is Vega, Yellow is Mira, and the Black band is Sirius.

Two weeks away from fledging. Here is the link to their streaming cam:

For Kestrel lovers, there are three chicks at the scrape in the Dordogne in France:

Cal Falcons has just posted a very cute video of Lindsay hunting moths at night. My goodness Alden has had such a huge influence in this moth hunting!

Lindsay did this on the 21st and in the video below the top one she returned today – the 27th of June to hunt moths, too.

Thank you so much for joining me this morning. It is much appreciated. Please take care. See you soon!!!

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams for the screen captures and/of videos used in this blog: Cal Falcons, Cilla Kinross, Faucons UdeM, ND-LEEF, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Post Code Lottery and the Woodland Trust, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, CarnyXWild, PLO, Emu and LizM and Faucons Crecerelles Dordogne.

Lindsay fledges, Little Bit 17 gets a whole fish, and other news in Bird World

17-18 June 2022

I really wish that I could send Louis and Dorcha some of our fine weather. This nest gas endured treacherous weather – horrific weather. Weather that you would never wish on your worst enemy. The only thing they haven’t had is _ _ _ _. Starts with an ‘S’ and ends with a ‘W’. I am not going to say it in case it happens. (I think they had that early on but not recently). Poor thing. Dorcha can hardly hold on and she is trying so hard to protect those precious babies.

You can’t see it in the image but the rain is pelting down and the wind is gale force. Not just blowing hard. Gale force.

The pounding rain has stopped for now at Loch Arkaig. I can hardly believe it – Louis has brought in a fish just after 0500. I hope the wind does not blow Dorcha off the nest like it has done on another occasion. She is trying hard to feed the Bobs and have some fish herself. Gracious.

Someone said they need to move to the other nest where it is more protected. Maybe they will after this year at this one!

Laddie LM12 brought in a super nice fish for Blue NC0 and the two osplets. It is early, early in the morning and this is brilliant. The day is starting off just great at the Loch of the Lowes.

Oh, it is such a nasty Saturday morning at the Dfyi nest. Idris hasn’t even left to go fishing yet. Everyone is wet – Telyn and the chicks are hoping the promised rain will not happen! It sure is beautiful and green but I would not want to visit western Scotland and Wales in June – all that rain and cold down to the bone.

Aran is away fishing. Mrs G is flying off for a break and the trio are sort of waking up. There is a fish already on the nest.

Dylan has brought Seren a fish for the family’s breakfast. It looks like it is a really rainy cold day at Llyn Clywedog. Sun please!!!!

Maya and the three Bobs at Rutland are waiting for Blue 33 to deliver breakfast! The question on everyone’s mind is: when will they ring the Bobs? Oldest Bob is 40 days old today. Ringing needs to take place before 45 days if it is just the Darvic Ring. If it is a satellite pack too, then from 40-45 days. Will they ring them on Monday?

There is good parenting DNA running through CJ7 and Blue 022. First time parents. Blue 022 shows up at 04:22 to give CJ7 a break and then he is off to get the breakfast fish. What a beautiful couple. I should note that it is incredibly foggy at Poole Harbour this morning.

The fog is lifting. Let us hope that Dad gets a fish soon.

It is a beautiful Saturday afternoon in Port Lincoln, Australia. Both Mum and Dad are on the barge. Does anyone think that they might actually lay their eggs earlier than last year? We will wait to see.

So why do you think that Lindsay doesn’t want Grinnell Jr looking out the stone work?!!!

You see Lindsay wanted to fledge first —— and that is precisely what she did! Lindsay landed on top of the library!!!!!

There was a lot of activity on the ND-LEEF nest this morning and one incident, right at the start of the morning, made all of us just drop for a few minutes. A prey delivery came in at 08:09:22. The adult flies into Little
Bit in the middle of the nest and then ND16? lands on Little Bit. All of that caused me to hold my breath for a moment ——along with anyone else watching closely at that time.

Little Bit was just minding his own business on the nest with 16 over at the rim and 15 up higher in the branches.

Adult arrives. You can see Little Bit behind and under the left wing and chest of the adult.

That is 16 on top of Little Bit. That little yellow foot on the right under 16 belongs to Little Bit.

Just look. Little Bit’s entire wing has been pulled over. Oh, gosh. My heart is sinking by now.

Gosh. Little Bit seems to have had everything that could happen – happen – to him. Here he is out sniffing around wanting to make that steal!

Little Bit gets that prey item and is still working on it when at 10:06:50 a fish is delivered. 16 gets it but walks away. 15 doesn’t even come down to eat and 17 takes that fish!

16 left the fish to moved up to the parent like it wanted the adult to feed it. Can you imagine when Little Bit looked over and saw that whole fish!!!!!!!! It is at the bottom right of the ‘1 Foot’ indicator.

Little Bit ate almost the entire fish. He walked away with a little left that 16 took.

I would say that Little Bit deserved that fish after what happened with the first delivery. He also deserved it because he has worked so bloody hard eating all the scraps off the nest and dried fish and Raccoon. What an amazing eaglet he is –so glad that he was not injured earlier.

At the Cornell Red-tail Hawk nest, L4 is on the fledge ledge. It is windy.

L4 is really getting some air.

Ospreys have been arriving and one has been moving sticks around the Cape Henlopen State Park nest that say the adults dead or disappear and the three chicks starve last weekend.

Everything looks good at the Glacier Gardens nest of Liberty and Freedom. the wee ones had their breakfast and are napping with Mum.

There was some excitement at the Redding nest of Liberty and Guardian. It ‘appeared’ that Star had fledged but later it was confirmed that it was Sentry flying off and then he returns chasing Liberty who arrives with a fish.

At the National Arboretum nest of Mr President and Lotus, one of the adults is keeping a close eye on Takoda who is running up and down the branch on the right hand side. It is windy. Will today be the day for Takoda to fly?

Ahote and Sky are on the natal nest this morning at the West End nest of Thunder and Akecheta. The adults will know where Kana’kini is and they will often now deliver prey off the nest to the fledglings if they are elsewhere.

Sky has been doing some great hovering but has yet to take that first flight.

If you haven’t voted for Richmond and Rosie’s two 2022 hatches, here is the announcement. You have 2 days to do so and it is free. Join in!

The little hawklet living with the Bald Eagles on Gabriola Island has branched! Well done!

There are so many nests to cover but that is it for this morning. We could see some more fledges Saturday afternoon. Congratulations to everyone at Cal Falcons – to Annie, Alden, an Grinnell – and to Lindsay for her first flight. It is OK to fly now Junior!!!!!

Thank you so much for being with me today. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: GROWLS, Cornell RTH, Cal Falcons, LD-NEEF, Cape Henlopen State Park Ospreys, Explore.org, SF Ospreys, NADC-AEF, Glacier Gardens, Port Lincoln Ospreys, Friends of Redding Eagles, Poole Harbour, LRWT, CarnyXWild, Bywyd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Dfyi Osprey Project, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, and Friends of Loch Arkaig, People’s Postcode Lottery, and the Woodland Trust.

Friday in Bird World

27 May 2022

I have been away most of the afternoon and have not been able to check on all the nests on my return. It was raining on the two osplets on the UFlorida-Gainesville nest and it looks like they have been at the hair salon, too!

It has been terrible weather at the ND-LEEF Bald Eagle nest. As I understand it the last big feed for ND17, Little Bit was last evening at 21:25. Little Bit was quite full. Eagles do not have to eat every day but 17 would benefit from having more regular food. I saw a discussion about the feathers on Little 17s head. Chicks show stress in their feature development if they have not had regular feedings or as much food as they should be having. In addition, siblings can during beaking pull out feathers. For 17 it could be a combination of both. He will be fine when food comes in later – except that the big siblings will also be hungry. Fingers crossed for lots of fish once the storm passes and the waters clear for fishing.

Sean and Lynn have posted the banding and Q & A session for Cal Falcons. There is some really interesting information in there and if you are interested, please do take the time to listen. Make sure to start it back at the beginning.

Mrs G and Aran now have two chicks as of 20:42 at the Glaslyn nest in Wales! This is the 51st chick for Mrs G and the third egg is cracking!!!!!! These three will be very close together. Fantastic. I continue to worry about the third hatches at both Loch of the Lowes and Llyn Clywedog.

Idris and Telyn have two of the cutest little osplets on the planet at their Dyfi nest, also in Wales.

Idris has two fish on the nest for Telyn and the kids. He is eating some of the second fish before departing for security duty.

There are three chicks on the Llyn Clywedog nest of Dylan and Seren. Yesterday, Dylan had been missing and the weather was terrible. A fish finally came to the nest. Everything seems to have been fine since then. Things have dried out. The third chick is quite small. A nice fish was delivered at 20:51.

The chicks at Manton Bay are so big compared to these wee hatchlings. They no longer fit well to be brooded by Maya.

Blue 33 was acting like there were intruders around. He kept looking around with his snake eyes.

I can hardly believe it. The rain and wind are gone. Dorcha has been able to dry out. We should be on hatch watch by the 31st for her and Louis’s chicks.

I am very concerned about the third hatch at Loch of the Lowes. Blue NC0 has a tendency not to feed them if they are not right in her face and beak. The two oldest at Llyn Clywedog are a bit of a handful, too. This was the early morning feeding at Loch of the Lowes. The wee one did not get any food and I haven’t seen it get fed today – I hope I missed it and please tell me if I did.

So the worries are Llyn Clywedog and Loch of the Lowes. A great nest to watch, if you are looking for one with little drama is going to be Idris and Telyn at the Dyfi. They are as steady as you go, just like Blue 33 and Maya at Rutland. Mrs G and Aran are the favourites of many and I personally like Foulshaw Moss with White YW and Blue 35 but I do not like their camera – no rewind!

Take care everyone. It was great to know that Annie was in the scrape with the two eyases – a daughter and a son – five minutes after the banders left! That is fantastic. Thank you so much for being with me today. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages: Cal Falcons, Friends of Loch of the Lowes and the Scottish Wildlife Trust, Dyfi Osprey Project, Brywd Gwyllt Glaslyn, Friends of Loch Arkaig and the People’s Post Code Lottery, UFlorida-Gainesville Ospreys, and LRWT.

Annie’s 4th ever female chick – and a loud little boy

27 May 2022

The banding at the University of California-Berkeley scrape is over! My goodness! The male chick is so loud you need noise cancelling head phones. Seriously.

Hatch 1 is a girl. This is Annie’s only 4th female in all the chicks she has hatched. You might remember that last year they were all male. Hatch 2 is a male.

Here are some images of the banding – which went very smoothly!

The female is being banded first. The female was quiet during the whole procedure. Her little brother was very vocal. Just look at him in the corner when his sister is moved.

Measurements.

Clamping of one of the bands.

The federal silver band has a different kind of rivet.

“I want my sister back!”

Taking a tiny piece of feather for DNA testing.

All done. Weighed, measured, health check and banding. The little male is vocalizing and in the protective mode.

This is my favourite image of both of them calling at once!

Measuring.

Banding.

Removing a feather from the back for DNA testing.

Checking and measuring the wing.

Both back in the scrape safe and sound.

Cal Falcons have posted the view from the north during the banding. You can see Annie and Alden flying around The Campanile while the chicks are being banded.

Thank you! There is a banding discussion and Q & A session at 12 noon Pacific Time.

Thanks Cal Falcons for your streaming cam and for the video of the banding!

Time Change for Annie, Grinnell, and Alden’s chicks to be ringed

24 May 2022

Thank you to ‘B’ who sent me a note saying that Cal Falcons had changed the time for the banding of the two chicks. Here is the notice on their Twitter Feed:

The time is Pacific.

If you visit the Berkeley Campus and do not have a pair of binoculars and would like to see if you can find the falcons, binoculars are now available to use thanks to the t-shirt sales! Isn’t that fantastic.

Here is an announcement from Cal Falcons about the last few days of fundraising this year:

I ordered the t-shirt on the right only long sleeved – because it is Annie and Grinnell. The cotton was lovely and soft not heavy and stiff like some t-shirts. I really liked it.

There are many places to donate or to purchase memorabilia. The joke is, like Julia Zarankin, author of Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder, I never anticipated wearing t-shirts with birds on them. I think Julia and I probably have the same size stack! I am going to put in a plug for Sean and Lynn- heavy organic material tote bags please and thank you.

If you haven’t read Zarankin’s book, it is hilarious. You will see yourself in the pages!!!!!

Thanks everyone. Be sure to change the time for the banding!

Late Sunday and early Monday in Bird World

22-23 May 20

I have been holding my breath and sitting on my hands. In an earlier blog I wrote and attached screen captures of Dale Hollow’s Middle – we call Warrior – going up the branch. Dale Hollow posted that Warrior had fludged – meaning he fell off that branch. Indeed, there was a video posted of that fall. Well, someone has now spent some time looking at that footage and has captured Warrior fledging from a lower branch. This is a relief. It is not nice worrying that they are grounded.

The parents continue to leave fish on the nest but so far neither DH14 or DH15 have returned and it is also reported that they have yet to be seen.

There is also news coming in of a Peregrine Falcon couple who are using the chimney of a thermal power plant in Japan for their scrape! I wish they would put a streaming cam up there for all of us that love falcons!!!!!!!

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20220520/p2a/00m/0li/032000c?fbclid=IwAR1fx8O4Dp_C_7w4jfIHPTatm7eIY5ma1UWZKD9QtYRpK_24gNLK9qRacII

I love Kakapo – even though they are not raptors. The news coming from the Kakapo Recovery is pretty good. Sadly, one of this years hatches has died in the Dunedin Veterinary Hospital since yesterday.

I want everyone to give a quiet applause for Little Bit 17 at the Notre Dame – LEEF nest. Look what that wee one did this morning!!!!!!!! It doesn’t get much better than this.

The adult arrives and leaves the fish on the nest. Little Bit has its head turned to the rim of the nest listening and turning around watching. The parent does not feed the bigger chicks – it flies up to a higher branch.

Between the arrival of the fish and 0702, Little Bit 17 pulls the fish over to ‘its area’. This is actually Little Bit’s stash or prey kitchen where he keeps things for later. Mum has found it but the older siblings do not root around there. Little Bit is busy eating on that fish and is already getting a bit of a crop. One of the elder siblings is nibbling and watching. No dominance tactics are noted.

Still eating. Other sibling is curious. Little Bit just keeps eating.

One of the older siblings is touching Little Bit’s beak wanting it to feed it! (or alternatively it is trying to get the fish out of Little Bit’s beak)

Little Bit has an enormous crop by now. You can see the fish piece over at the side of the nest.

When Little Bit was finished the older siblings pulled the leftover piece to the edge and started feeding.

One big sibling on the rim and the other down in the nest with Little Bit doing beak kisses again.

That is Little Bit 17. Look at those nice wings this morning. He has energy to spare. What a wonderful way to start the day!!!!!!!!!

The University of Florida Osprey nest at their Gainesville camera had issues with their streaming cam this morning and it was off line. The students of the Wildlife Conservancy course did post the winning names (by public vote). Big sibling is Breezy. Middle sibling is Windy. Mum is Stella while Dad is Talon. There was a tie for the name of the nest – Cheep Seats or Home Plate.

A lovely image of Blue 35 at the Foulshaw Moss nest in Cumbria feeding the eldest chick just after the second one hatched.

The four eyases in the Dolina Baryczy Peregrine Falcon nest in Poland near Lodz are really filling up the nest! Dad has just delivered a prey item for them.

The five Peregrine Falcons are not as big as those in Poland. They are losing the down around their eyes and the beautiful wing and tail feathers are coming in. Everyone had a good breakfast this morning in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Cal Falcons has posted that the banding of the chicks will take place on the 27th of May at 1400 Pacific Time.

All of the eggs have hatched at the Black Stork nest of Grafs and Grafiene in Jogdeva County, Estonia. There were six eggs and the moderator of the chat says there has been no elimination of any chicks this year so far. So this is a historic moment in the history of the Black Storks in the Balkans and in Estonia – six chicks! Fingers crossed that there is enough food for all of them.

We are waiting for the eggs to hatch for Karl II and Kaia at the Karula National Forest nest, also in Estonia. Their last egg was laid on 1 May.

We are also waiting for Bukacheck and Betty’s eggs to begin hatching in Mlade Buky, The Czech Republic.

If we blink they turn into hawks not little nestlings. Look at the feather growth and that gorgeous peach on the breast of Big Red and Arthur’s eyases on the Cornell RTH nest! Gracious. Fledge is what? 2 or 3 weeks away. I will have to do the calculations but they should have fledged by the middle of June. Hard to believe. L4 still has a lot of feather development needed and one rule of thumb is that it is better the more dark bars they have on their tails – 5 is the minimum, preferably 6 at fledge.

Thank you so very much for joining me today. I hope that each of you has a wonderful Monday. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams and/or FB pages where I took my screen captures: ND-LEEF, Kakapo Recovery, Cornell Bird Lab RTH, Mlade Buky White Storks, Eagle Club of Estonia, DHEC, Cal Falcons, Dolina Baryczy, Peregrine Netrworks, and the Cumbria Wildlife Trust.

The Little Eaglet that Could and a few other stories from Bird World

21 May 2022

It has been a very, very challenging breeding season. The weather has not cooperated causing diminished prey deliveries and deaths either by starvation or siblicide/starvation. Eaglets have fallen from their cliff nests – thankfully rescued by their guardian angel, Dr Sharpe. Adults have been killed or driven from the nest by intruders with many others dying of Avian Flu. Some have died of indeterminate causes while others were injured and taken into care. Some eggs never hatched having become breakfast for the Crows. We have favourite nestlings and then, things go sideways. We become afraid to watch their lives – it really does hurt that much when they are attacked by their older siblings or ignored by their parents.

Not all chicks who are attacked by their siblings survive. We know this. Sometimes we think that they will not last another day. Then, something happens. Yesterday when its mother would not feed it, ND17 ate an entire fish that was left on the nest and ignored by the older siblings —by itself. Today, its mother fed it a few bites. Later 17 found a piece of fish hidden in the nest and horked it. There he is on the far left. Note 17’s size in relation to the two older siblings who not only have their juvenile plumage but also have tails that are growing and growing.

At 17:01, something extraordinary happens. This is ‘why’ you keep watching, ‘why’ you keep hoping because in a single moment the nest that had gone sideways can right itself. It is the most exhilarating feeling — by far a greater sense of happiness than watching a nest where everything is perfect.

Mum arrives with a fish. At 17:01 and for the next sixteen minutes, Little 17’s life takes a turn. 17 is on the right side of Mum with big sibling on the left. The other is at the other side of the nest not paying much attention. What was it that suddenly changed 17 from a submissive little eaglet to an extremely brave one? Was it eating the entire fish itself yesterday? was it the finding and horking of the fish piece? was it Mum feeding it a few bites this morning? or was it hunger and a new found confidence that drove 17 to become the ‘king’ of the snatch and grab today? We will never know but this third hatch showed us just the kind of ‘stuff’ it is made of – this is going to be a formidable eaglet if he survives. Fingers crossed.

Still images do not do the actions of this this brave little eaglet justice. Watch carefully – about half way through 17 actually grabs the fish out of the older siblings beak! Yes, I am serious.

I wonder – having seen her youngest stand up and fight for its place at the table – will Mum feed her youngest chick? Will she position the fish so that the little one can eat and not have to contend with the peckings from the older siblings? We have to wait and see. One thing is for sure – 17 has a burning desire to survive. He is not afraid to root in the nest and find pieces of dry fish if eating them means he will stay alive. He is a survivor.

In the image below you can see the enormous crop that 17 has! Fantastic.

In other news, Dr Sharpe gave Chase and Cholyn’s only eaglet a thorough examination. The eaglet was measured, weighed, and banded. She is 11D, a sister to Thunder and an auntie to Thunder and Akecheta’s triplets.

The camera came on for just a second. Look at that nice red bling! And her silver federal band.

The two osplets at the UFlorida-Gainesville Osprey nest experienced something very different today– pelting rain and hail. I was just glad it wasn’t a tornado!

After the storm passed, Mum returned to the nest. There was some fish and, despite Big standing tall and trying to unhinge Middle, Middle stayed put and kept eating.

Middle is on the left and Big with her longer tail and long, long legs is on the right.

In the image below, Big tries to scare Middle away from the food. It doesn’t really work so well anymore.

It is a beautiful evening at the Dale Hollow nest. Looking at that big stick that Warrior pulled across the nest it is almost like River said “when you leave, shut the door and put the key under the mat!” The older sibling, DH14, fludged on the 19th of May. I hope that Warrior had a smooth flight! (or is he still sitting in the top of the nest tree?)

Lady and Dad have been spending more and more time at their nest in the Sydney Olympic Forest. Today they were rearranging twigs and building up the crib rails while. They were also busy placing fresh leaves down on the nest bowl. We are getting close!

This is the link to their camera:

Those were just a few of the numerous highlights at the nests today. New hatches are being fed and with the exception of several intruders, all of the other nests seem to be doing well. It was such a relief to see ND17 well fed two days in a row. I hope that Warrior’s first flight – if he did fledge – was a perfect take off and landing. Hopefully there will be some footage of the banding of 11D today at the Two Harbours nest. Cal Falcons should be banding Annie, Grinnell’s and Alden’s chicks soon. I did watch Alden feed the chicks again. He is getting quite good this!

Thank you so much for joining me. Take care all. See you soon.

Thank you to the following for their streaming cams where I took my screen captures: Explore.org and the Institute for Wildlife Studies, ND-LEEF, DHEC, and Sea Eagles@Birdlife Australia Discovery Centre.